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  • Potato question - sweet vs white

    I'm in the middle (day 4) of the Primal Potato Diet. It's going very well and I'm losing weight. (I lost 8.2 lbs in 7 days last Oct., the first time I tried this diet) I've been reading that sweet potatoes can be interchanged with white potatoes without any problems. Looking up the nutrition of the two kinds of potatoes, I noticed that the sweet potato has less carbs than the white but more sugar. I'm almost at my goal weight, about 5 more lbs to lose and I don't want to mess up the success I'm enjoying by eating a sweet potato now and again instead of a white. After all, I plan to do this for just 7 days, like last time, and I'm not so overwhelmed with boredom or hunger that I would need to eat another kind of potato.
    Last edited by Rosemary 231; 02-10-2013, 11:59 AM.

  • #2
    On PB, no white potato, sweet is OK. There are other kinds I didn't know existed, purple potatoes are expecially recommended. They taste good but they're dry, so I add a good bit of liquid and butter to the mash.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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    • #3
      Some info I found , copy and paste:

      Sweet potatoes are actually a completely different vegetable than regular potatoes. They are not even in the same botanical family. While each is an important vegetable, deserving of a place in a healthy diet, these two foods feature different tastes and unique nutritional benefits. Sweet potatoes offer a host of nutrients and an impressive array of antioxidants. They taste delicious, are easy to prepare and can be used in a variety of dishes, even in some that call for white potatoes.

      Sweet potatoes are not "potatoes"

      While there are over 100 varieties of edible potatoes that range in size, shape, color, starch content and flavor, the sweet potato is not one of them. These two root vegetables are in fact from two completely different families. The potato's scientific name, Solanum tuberosum reflects that it belongs to the Solanaceae family whose other members include tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and tomatillos.

      The sweet potato, on the other hand, belongs to the Convolvulaceae plant family and is known by the scientific name of Ipomoea batatas. The well-known flower called "Morning Glory" belongs to the same botanical family as the sweet potato.
      Some of you may die, but that is a risk I'm willing to take.

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      • #4
        Never heard of the primal potato diet before. Sounds like a hack unrelated to the Primal Blueprint.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Rosemary 231 View Post
          I'm in the middle (day 4) of the Primal Potato Diet. It's going very well and I'm losing weight. (I lost 8.2 lbs in 7 days last Oct., the first time I tried this diet) I've been reading that sweet potatoes can be interchanged with white potatoes without any problems. Looking up the nutrition of the two kinds of potatoes, I noticed that the sweet potato has less carbs than the white but more sugar. I'm almost at my goal weight, about 5 more lbs to lose and I don't want to mess up the success I''m enjoying by eating a sweet potato now and again instead of a white. After all, I plan to do this for just 7 days, like last time, and I'm not so overwhelmed with boredom or hunger that I would need to eat another kind of potato.
          Almost everyone who tried the Potato Diet with things other than plain, white potatoes did not do well. Lost your weight with white potatoes, but afterwards, add sweet potatoes as well as plantains, rice, and more white potatoes to your menu.

          So, white potatoes, as plain as possible for max weight loss. Salt, pepper, vinegar, and maybe a bit of ketchup--but that's it!

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          • #6
            The best way to find out what is primal and why, is usually to go to the blog and "food you're searching primal". You can do it from the forum search bar also, but I find I get blog results more often if I start at the blog (might be my imagination).

            Asking in the forums will get you answers, but unless someone quotes the blog, they won't be Mark's answers.
            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

            B*tch-lite

            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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            • #7
              On the Paleo diet, Loren Cordain recommends not eating white potatoes because they are members of a family of plants (nightshades) that contain saponins. He believes these saponins can exacerbate any leaky gut problems. You might go look at Loren Cordain's blog to see if he has more information about that if you are interested.

              Since sweet potatoes are not nightshades and don't have saponins, they're considered safer to eat. The Primal Blueprint gets a lot of its ideas from paleo but also from elsewhere. The Primal Blueprint is also less strict about what should be avoided. I think Mark still recommends not eating white potatoes. He loves purple sweet potatoes.

              Many people around here do eat white potatoes. There's a silly crash diet that eats only white potatoes and nothing else. Then there are people like me who just eat them now and then. I think sweet potatoes are better, but now and then white potatoes hit the spot.
              Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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              • #8
                Rosemary 231 is doing the crazy hack diet. Crazy, but very effective for a quick drop of 5-10 pounds. Mark likes white potatoes anyway: Are Potatoes Healthy? | Mark's Daily Apple

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                • #9
                  An excerpt from Mark S:

                  If you’re stalling on weight loss as you near your goal, try carb refeeds with potatoes to restore leptin and jumpstart the leaning out process.

                  If potatoes give you fits, don’t eat them. You’re not missing much beyond a cheap source of calories that converts to glucose almost instantly. If lots of people you trust on other matters are reporting problems with potatoes, be mindful, be wary, and always pay close attention to how they affect you.

                  Read more: Are Potatoes Healthy? | Mark's Daily Apple

                  There is a difference betw. a diet w/potatoes and a diet of potatoes.
                  Last edited by Terry H; 02-10-2013, 07:03 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I view them as interchangeable, but subtle differences make white potatoes preferable for weight gain (fat OR muscle) and sweet potatoes better if you limit your carbs (as they have more micro-nutrients, so you get more micro-bang for your macro-buck, if you get what I mean).

                    I use sweet-taters when not very hungry and white ones when starving.
                    --
                    Perfection is entirely individual. Any philosophy or pursuit that encourages individuality has merit in that it frees people. Any that encourages shackles only has merit in that it shows you how wrong and desperate the human mind can get in its pursuit of truth.

                    --
                    I get blunter and more narcissistic by the day.
                    I'd apologize, but...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kochin View Post
                      I view them as interchangeable, but subtle differences make white potatoes preferable for weight gain (fat OR muscle) and sweet potatoes better if you limit your carbs (as they have more micro-nutrients, so you get more micro-bang for your macro-buck, if you get what I mean).

                      I use sweet-taters when not very hungry and white ones when starving.
                      How do you cook sweet potatoes? I have been wrapping them whole in tin foil and baking, but they come out really mushy. They are edible, but no where near the fluffy texture of a white potato.

                      Also, do they have plantains where you are? Those are excellent! I just started eating them this year and wish I knew about them years ago.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by otzi View Post
                        How do you cook sweet potatoes? I have been wrapping them whole in tin foil and baking, but they come out really mushy. They are edible, but no where near the fluffy texture of a white potato.

                        Also, do they have plantains where you are? Those are excellent! I just started eating them this year and wish I knew about them years ago.
                        Like plantains, check out mofongo. Huge Hispanic population around here, so lots of restaurants around here serve it. I usually get it with chiccarones. Drool....

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by otzi View Post
                          How do you cook sweet potatoes? I have been wrapping them whole in tin foil and baking, but they come out really mushy. They are edible, but no where near the fluffy texture of a white potato.

                          Also, do they have plantains where you are? Those are excellent! I just started eating them this year and wish I knew about them years ago.
                          Fried:
                          Slice VERY thinly and fry in lard or tallow.

                          Boiled in stews:
                          Use to replace carrots or other sweet root veg/tubers.

                          Baked:
                          Bake in their skin, no foil. That way the skin is firm and the flesh is nicer. Take them out when ALMOST done, cut open and mush up. If you want them fluffy it's best to microwave-finish after that. Add butter and either sardines of fried bacon bits.

                          Mashed:
                          With butter and seasoning.

                          Grilled:
                          Slice thinly (not as thin as for fried) and grill, maybe with some salt.

                          Frittata:
                          Grate raw sweet tater and mix with egg, ground meat and seasoning. Make a patty and fry.

                          Oven chips:
                          Slice to chip size (along with other veg, usually). Soak in water for about an hour, maybe more. Place in a pan with lard and roast. Be sure to turn them over, to coat them in lard!

                          They have plantains at the local Asian stores, but I've not yet bought any. They're a bit pricey so far. Not quite the season for them, it seems, but they will apparently be cheaper in Summer. I've had taro and yam from them, though. Those are damn nice starches.
                          Sweet taters, bananas and taro probably account for every "high carb" day I've had.
                          --
                          Perfection is entirely individual. Any philosophy or pursuit that encourages individuality has merit in that it frees people. Any that encourages shackles only has merit in that it shows you how wrong and desperate the human mind can get in its pursuit of truth.

                          --
                          I get blunter and more narcissistic by the day.
                          I'd apologize, but...

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                          • #14
                            if you have a crockpot, that seems like the best way to cook both whites and sweets. By the way, I MUCH prefer the japanese sweet potatoes that are purplish on the outside and white on the inside. Anyhow, I put a bunch of regular and sweets together in the crockpot with about an inch of water in the bottom and let them cook on high for 4 hours. They do not shrivel up like they do in the oven or get grainy like they do when you boil them. I think they are steaming in the crockpot, so they are moist and plump. Really great way to cook taters.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Black Timber View Post
                              Some info I found , copy and paste:

                              Sweet potatoes are actually a completely different vegetable than regular potatoes. They are not even in the same botanical family. While each is an important vegetable, deserving of a place in a healthy diet, these two foods feature different tastes and unique nutritional benefits. Sweet potatoes offer a host of nutrients and an impressive array of antioxidants. They taste delicious, are easy to prepare and can be used in a variety of dishes, even in some that call for white potatoes.

                              Sweet potatoes are not "potatoes"

                              While there are over 100 varieties of edible potatoes that range in size, shape, color, starch content and flavor, the sweet potato is not one of them. These two root vegetables are in fact from two completely different families. The potato's scientific name, Solanum tuberosum reflects that it belongs to the Solanaceae family whose other members include tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and tomatillos.

                              The sweet potato, on the other hand, belongs to the Convolvulaceae plant family and is known by the scientific name of Ipomoea batatas. The well-known flower called "Morning Glory" belongs to the same botanical family as the sweet potato.
                              Thanks, I find it interesting that it isn't a potato at all.

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