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How Much Protein is REALLY Necessary

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  • #16
    Well people goes astray on this issue; "gluconeogenesis" is a metabolic patway that produces glucose from aminoacids(proteins) that either comes from what you eat or from breakdown of protein in lean tissue. A very little part of the glucose made from gluconeogenesis also comes from glycerol(from fat). That's pretty much everything that you need to know on gluconeogenesis...
    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

    - Schopenhauer

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Balance View Post
      So are you saying that Gluconeogenesis is not the process in which the body will break down fat or protein to create glucose for the body and brain? That is the way I have always read about it in my physiology books as well as the Paleo Solution and Primal Blueprint? Robb Wolf has said many times on his podcast that the body prefers fat for gluconeogenesis.
      That's not really how you phrased it, and I was also disagreeing with "this is actually the bodies preferred source of glucose for the brain".

      Gluconeogenesis works in unison with lipolysis using your two main stress hormones.
      Make America Great Again

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      • #18
        Ahh I see. I just thought I remember Robb Wolf mentioning it being preferred on a podcast.
        "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

        People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

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        • #19
          You don't "need" very much protein at all to survive.

          20 Potatoes a Day for 60 Days

          As clearly demonstrated in this experiment, you don't need much at all. A potato contains very little protein (<2g/potato), but it is high quality complete protein. This is a very low protein diet, but not only did the man survive, he thrived - his health markers greatly improved on his low protein, mega high carbohydrate, near zero fat diet.

          You don't "need" any carbohydrate at all to survive. Your body can just break down muscle tissue for the glucose it needs.

          You don't "need" any saturated or monounsaturated fat to survive, and very little polyunsaturated fat. 1-2 grams of omega 3 and 2-4 grams of omega 6 is probably all you need a day. Maybe even less. Your body can manufacture SFA and MUFA from excess triglyceride from carbohydrate and protein.

          But living based on "needs" is silly. You should be living trying to optimize your health. Chances are, if you describe your diet using the word "high" or "low," it probably isn't optimal. I recommend doing what I did - start at 33% calories from fat, 33% calories from protein and 33% calories from carbohydrate. Choose all healthy sources (meat, eggs, fruits, starches, vegetables) and adjust accordingly until you feel best. I would up around 30% fat, 30% protein, 40% carbs and I'm fairly sedentary.
          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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          • #20
            Well, I guess my hope is to lose weight but keep lean muscle mass. I have 100+ pounds to lose to get to a healthy weight. I don't tend to exercise, as I have very painful joints right now, but do walk about 3 miles throughout the day (pedometer tracking). It says I generally burn around 3000-3500 calories a day just doing what I'm doing.

            My hope is to be eating better, healthier meats but the expense is high. I can manage organic produce but the organic forms of protein is tougher to afford much of. If I only need a small amount, and perhaps not even every day, I might be able to afford that little bit. I also don't have a large fridge/freezer, so buying in bulk isn't an option. I just don't want to do any damage to my system or derail my weight loss because of a lack of protein (from meat). I can always supplement with nuts, etc, if the amount is quite small, but do not want to make any changes until I have a better idea of how much the body needs.

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            • #21
              Dairy and eggs would be a much better and cheaper source of protein then nuts and grassfed meats.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by bellajgw View Post
                Well, I guess my hope is to lose weight but keep lean muscle mass. I have 100+ pounds to lose to get to a healthy weight. I don't tend to exercise, as I have very painful joints right now, but do walk about 3 miles throughout the day (pedometer tracking). It says I generally burn around 3000-3500 calories a day just doing what I'm doing.

                My hope is to be eating better, healthier meats but the expense is high. I can manage organic produce but the organic forms of protein is tougher to afford much of. If I only need a small amount, and perhaps not even every day, I might be able to afford that little bit. I also don't have a large fridge/freezer, so buying in bulk isn't an option. I just don't want to do any damage to my system or derail my weight loss because of a lack of protein (from meat). I can always supplement with nuts, etc, if the amount is quite small, but do not want to make any changes until I have a better idea of how much the body needs.
                Eat lotsa eggs. They are good for you in many manners other than the cheap protein. For losing weight and keeping lean muscle Marks 7-1g/lb of lean mass is a fine starting point.

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