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The Porcelain Doll Diet

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  • #16
    From the article, the opening premise:
    So then, is it really so far fetched to think that the stress of eating sugar, or easily oxidized polyunsaturated fats, or processed garbage (“toxins”), or over-eating, might be good for you sometimes? So long as you supplement it with the dietary version of rest – healthful, nutrient-rich foods with the occasional abstinence from food? Why would these forms of stress and rest be any different?
    I think that the dietary stresses we are supposed to indulge in that might be good for you sometimes include things like whiskey and wine, possibly sugar (or honey in large quantities or binges on sweet fruit even if that fruit has been cooked down to a sweet syrupy delight), vegetables that are toxic in large doses (very bitter things, for example), over-eating and under-eating for sure possibly a little smoking of one thing or another on an irregular basis and possibly also certain alkaloid, mind-altering substances on rare occasion.

    The author says his grandmother is 80 now. My grandmother was 80 in 1985. So this means the author of that blog post is not very old right now. He should theorize about the value of regular crap processed food consumption when he's well into his 40s or 50s and let us know if it really was so beneficial after all.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #17
      Ah, an apologetic for dietary relativism. There can't be a consequence for anyone's choices, right? It wd.n't be fair. Of course anyone who is scrupulous must be harboring self-hatred and beating themselves over a cookie while people are drinking oil and shoving Resistant Starch down their(uh-oh here it comes) pie-holes to lose that extra 5 lbs see no incongruity there.

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      • #18
        Good article for sure!

        I think for people who are not eating for illness it is a good approach. However his lead up to being able to do that was by training his mind and body HOW to eat properly. Eating habits are not called 'habits' for no reason. It is because we have behaved in a certain way for a while it becomes our 'eating behaviour'. To follow something strictly helps enforce and learn new habits so that we can stick with in the healthy realm when making decisions. Instead of grabbing that bag of chips when we leave the house we have some fruit of a baggy of mixed veggies. As well as learning how to eat and cook without turning to simple carbs as a filler or as a side.

        For me its about learning and enforcing proper habits. If i allow myself to"cheat" in the beginning stages of enforcement I(and probably others) will become too lax before things are properly enforced so that healthy choices become natural.

        Just a thought...

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        • #19
          Hi everyone, I'm the author of that article. I was really happy to see this spurred some discussion and I'd like to leave a few comments on a few comments that were made regarding my comments.

          Like someone here implied, I am a young (26) healthy male, and I'm surrounded daily by even younger, probably even healthier people. The article was framed by my own circumstances in life. I did not write that article for people who are legitimate celiacs, or people with other serious health concerns. We've already got Chris Kresser for that, and he does a much better job than I do! Nor did I intend to rub my healthiness in your face. I'm a researcher who studies Type 2 Diabetes, so I deal with an unhealthy population face-to-face - I would never do that to them, or anyone who is inflicted by a disease. I apologize if it came off that way, I really did not mean it like that.

          If people have any more direct questions I'd be glad to discuss them! I see some general concerns being voiced but I really don't want to go off rambling like a madman...

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          • #20
            Anytime I want to be covered in boils and limp for three days from hip pain, I know junk food will do that for me. I am free to poison myself anytime. That article is crap. Screw those lucky buggers who can go to taco bell and have twinkies for dessert and still look healthy the next day. More heart disease for them, I say!
            Crohn's, doing SCD

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            • #21
              Good article. Hormesis is defintely real. So are self inflicted food intolerances people give themselves by remaining on overly strict diets.
              You see it on many different diet forums. Foods people used to tolerate well now leave them in discomfort for 24 hours following. This is not a good thing.

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              • #22
                When I was young and healthy and strong I used to think and act the same. Now I am wiser, because I can see where this did lead me to: 110 kg and painful joints to a point that any movement was almost impossible. And we did not have any crap foods around when I was young.

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                • #23
                  I agree that acute stress to the body can make us stronger, but chronic stress does not. So, eating processed junk food in the short-term may be fine, but years down the line of eating junk won't be. I get not being so strict all the time that we eat the same things day in and day out, but there are healthier ways to add variability to the diet.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Forgotmylastusername View Post
                    Good article. Hormesis is defintely real. So are self inflicted food intolerances people give themselves by remaining on overly strict diets.
                    You see it on many different diet forums. Foods people used to tolerate well now leave them in discomfort for 24 hours following. This is not a good thing.
                    +1

                    This happened to my husband. After a lifetime of eating pasta and bread and cheese in Italy, where he's from, he started avoiding it when we got together because of my diet, and because he thought it would help with his autoimmune diseases. Not only did it not help him (his worst flares were while eating strict grain/dairy-free paleo), but he ended up developing a pretty annoying intolerance to all the foods he cut out. After re-introducing them slowly, once a week, he was able to eat them again without problem. I know this isn't the case for everyone, and one possible reason is that the quality of the foods he had been eating in Italy were quite high; everything was homecooked and local, he ate only during meal times, no junk food/candy/restaurants/fast food.

                    I don't think the author is advocating eating a bunch of shit all day every day, but he's saying that having a few 'bad' things periodically can end up being more beneficial than being super-strict and NEVER having anything bad. I agree with this. Unfortunately, for people with disorder eating issues, it's very difficult to have 'bad' things in moderation. That doesn't mean it shouldn't still be a goal, but for them the situation is more complex. Likewise for people with serious health problems.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
                      Unfortunately, for people with disorder eating issues, it's very difficult to have 'bad' things in moderation.
                      For sugar burner and grain eater its practically impossible. Or there would not be anything like "bing eating". Who would do it if could avoid?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by SeaHorse View Post
                        For sugar burner and grain eater its practically impossible. Or there would not be anything like "bing eating". Who would do it if could avoid?
                        Huh?

                        I don't really understand what a 'sugar burner' is. I eat a high carb/low fat diet and have recently incorporated some gluten-free grains back into my diet. (some days, like yesterday, it was 60C/20F/20P). I don't binge anymore, and I can easily skip meals whenever I want. When I ate a high fat/low carb diet, I was always trying to suppress my desire to binge. Now, that desire doesn't exist.

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                        • #27
                          I just think if you are going to induce hormesis, it's best done with "natural" "toxins" rather than MSG, trans-fats, food coloring, artificial flavors and whatever other additives. That's my only critique. Otherwise, I do agree that if you have a cookie or a plate of pasta once in a while there's no reason to panic. If I ever hike the Pacific Crest Trail again I will likely consume large quantities of oats and corn (in the form of Fritos, as well as potatoes in the form of chips and fries) to make the distance, so it's not like I'm a total hardliner when it comes to this stuff.
                          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                          • #28
                            Scenario 1) The world is writhing with poisonous fire, get used to the flames so your scars are thick enough to resist the toxicity and you can venture out into the toxic chaos.

                            Scenario 2) Stop living in a toxic world.

                            Hmm, really tricky choices, huh?


                            For the record, when I lived entirely on processed food, my face was dripping with pus, I'd get home from work and pass out on the floor or couch or bed, only to wake inside of a body that audibly creaked with every painful movement. I lived on pain-killers and candy and boxes of wheat in different forms. There was no hormesis, no adaptation to the toxicity, only obesity and intense pain all day, all over. These people advocating intake of modern, artificial poisons to which the body should NEVER have to adapt are outright lunatics, willful liars and brazen heretics worthy of suffering any pain they have inflicted. If I listen to these bozos and eat a few cookies every week, that means I'm inflamed and living in pain for HALF of my life, and what of potential damage to my arteries? If my face is dripping pus and I am infinitely hungry and cannot stop eating more and more fake food, how is this beneficial to my longevity? Should I visit you every morning and smack your forehead with a pointy hammer just to make sure you can take it in the real world? Is that hormetic enough for you, you sick puppies? I'd be more than happy to, just let me know!

                            EDIT: Yes, to this day, even after months of pure paleo, a few cookies with wheat and/or margarine will create joint pain and face/back boils for three or four days. There is no healing from things that kill you.
                            Last edited by Knifegill; 01-22-2013, 10:22 AM.
                            Crohn's, doing SCD

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                              I just think if you are going to induce hormesis, it's best done with "natural" "toxins" rather than MSG, trans-fats, food coloring, artificial flavors and whatever other additives. That's my only critique. Otherwise, I do agree that if you have a cookie or a plate of pasta once in a while there's no reason to panic. If I ever hike the Pacific Crest Trail again I will likely consume large quantities of oats and corn (in the form of Fritos, as well as potatoes in the form of chips and fries) to make the distance, so it's not like I'm a total hardliner when it comes to this stuff.
                              Right there with you.

                              Even as a person who eats for a medical condition I don't consider myself a "hardliner" I guess.
                              In that I do treat myself.

                              I just don't really understand the need to do so on highly processed junk foods.
                              I sometimes have carby days where I eat baked sweet plantains at home, or a premium frozen custard locally.
                              I go out for mexican food on occasion and don't stress about the oil they use... an even munch on a few of the in restaurant made chips with some salsa.

                              A burger and fries from a fast food chain. No.
                              I honestly thought that tasted like CRAP even before I was Primal and would only eat it in the worst sort of situations with zero other options... and then It was a Wendy's Chicken Sandwich because at least they used whole chicken breasts. That happened maybe once a year.
                              Not interested even if I could. (I have to be GF.)
                              “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                              ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                              And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by peril View Post
                                Sounds like a concept the author has plucked out of the air. No science behind it.
                                Ironic comment posted on a "Paleo diet" message board...
                                http://stackingplates.com/

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