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"our bodies attack pork as a virus"....where does this come from?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by bloodorchid View Post
    can do, pass me all that except the squid
    Squid is delicious...
    I'll have your extra portion please!
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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    • #47
      Pork makes me nauseaus, ever since I was a kid. A piece of bacon very occasionally is all I can do. Don't care ... Plenty of other choices.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
        The cannibal tribes of the South Pacific referred to human meat as "long pork". Seriously.
        LOL. That alone will probably put me off pork for a month. But I can't help myself, I love bacon. I have cut way back on pork chops and such like that since reading about pork being so similar biologically, but bacon is my weakness.
        High Weight: 225
        Weight at start of Primal: 189
        Current Weight: 174
        Goal Weight: 130

        Primal Start Date: 11/26/2012

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        • #49
          Originally posted by cori93437 View Post
          Squid is delicious...
          I'll have your extra portion please!
          squid and i have a terrible relationship with each other. i eat him, he bloats my face up like a balloon

          it was uuuuuuugly
          beautiful
          yeah you are

          Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
          lol

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          • #50
            Note to self: no squid in the bunker.
            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

            B*tch-lite

            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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            • #51
              but plenty of booze
              beautiful
              yeah you are

              Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
              lol

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              • #52
                I've basically heard the exact opposite that most of you think about pork. With pork, you WANT it to be cured. NOT UNCURED.

                CURED, UNCURED AND MARINATED PORK

                Pork meat is highly perishable, even when refrigerated. In the distant past, curing pork was very important to prevent the meat of the large butchered animal from rotting, so that most of the meat was treated in that way in order to preserve it. It is “cured” with the use of curing salts, which typically include table salt, sodium nitrite, and sometimes sodium or potassium nitrate (saltpeter) to make bacon and ham.

                Use of salts to pickle pork has also been shown to kill cysts of Taenia solium after twelve hours.1 Such salts also inhibit growth of harmful microbes to prevent rancidity of the meat and food poisoning. Ordinary table salt, sodium chloride, is the essential salt used in curing, but nitrates and nitrites are commonly used to add color, flavor and texture. It is not completely understood how all of these salts contribute to flavor, but numerous chemical changes in the composition of the meat occur. In addition to salts, sugar is typically added in curing pork to improve flavor, to counteract the harshness of the salts, and to provide food for desirable microorganisms to ferment and produce compounds that are flavorful, such as organic acids.

                Nitrate-reducing bacteria are facilitated in the curing process. They ferment the nitrate and nitrite to nitrous acid, which reacts with the muscle protein, myoglobin, to produce a stable, bright pink color characteristic of many hams and bacon. However, it is well known that nitrates and nitrites are weak mutagens and carcinogens. Moreover, consumption of such a nitrite- or nitrate-containing food may lead to the production of nitrosoamines, also carcinogenic, in our stomachs.

                Another way of curing pork is to use condensed celery juice instead of the nitrate or nitrate salts. Celery juice is high in natural nitrates and contains other nutrients of celery that may counteract the carcinogenicity of the nitrates. Thus, it seems a safer alternative, although some individuals report adverse reactions to meat cured with celery juice. Bacon treated with celery juice is typically labeled “no nitrates.”

                The safest preservation of pork without any use of nitrates and nitrite salts is simply the use of sodium chloride and a natural sweetener, such as maple sugar, to treat the meat, sometimes with a few spices for flavor. This is the old traditional method of preserving meat over the ages. It results in a preserved pork product, a bacon or ham that is known today as “uncured.” It does not have the pink color, nor does it have the long shelf life of the cured products, but it has more flavor and shelf life than raw unprocessed pork.
                But wait, there's more.

                LIVE BLOOD ANALYSIS

                The blood is the tissue most easily monitored to show rapid changes in response to nutrients....Three adults, including two females aged thirty-seven and sixty, and one male aged fifty-two, participated in the study. The average length of time they had consumed the WAPF diet was forty-five months. Subjects each came to the laboratory once weekly for five weeks at the same time of day by individual appointment...

                ...All of the meats used were of the highest quality from sustainable small farms raising pastured livestock. Five preparations of meat were used:

                1. Unmarinated pastured center-cut pork chop;
                2. Apple cider vinegar-marinated (twenty-four hours while refrigerated) pastured center-cut pork chop;
                3. Uncured pastured prosciutto;
                4. Uncured pastured bacon;
                5. Unmarinated pastured lamb chop.

                ...After consuming the pork, subjects were allowed to leave the laboratory, instructed to drink only water as needed, and to refrain from eating anything else. Five hours later, each subject returned to the laboratory for a post-meat blood test...The results show unequivocally that consuming unmarinated cooked pork shows a significant negative effect on the blood. Five hours after consumption, subjects showed extremely coagulated blood, with extensive red blood cell (RBC) rouleaux (cells in the formation of stacked coins), RBC aggregates, and the presence of clotting factors, especially fibrin, which is seen as white threads in dark-field microscopy...By contrast, all three subjects reported no fatigue or other symptoms after eating the marinated cooked pork chop...Figure 6 shows the blood of the female subject, age thirty-seven, fasted, prior to consuming four strips of uncured pastured bacon. Again, this subject’s blood is normal and healthy, without any RBC aggregates or fibrin. Figure 7 shows the blood of the same subject, five hours after consuming the bacon. The subject’s RBCs are not aggregated; there is only a minuscule amount of platelet aggregates and fibrin...As an additional control, we also looked for an effect from consuming an unmarinated, pastured lamb chop on the blood of the same three subjects. The blood of the female subject, age thirty-seven, prior to eating the lamb chop is shown in Figure 10. Her blood is seen as normal, healthy blood with a few platelet aggregates. About five hours after consuming the lamb chop, her blood appears as shown in Figure 11, which is about the same as the pre-lamb condition.
                Essentially, the vinegar marinating and/or curing process destroys the toxins in the pork. Eating uncured, untreated pork is where the problem begins. Essentially, bacon is healthier than pork chops, and if you're going to eat pork chops, marinate them in an acid first.

                I have my own reserves regarding pork. Its tissue is very, very similar to human tissue. It makes me wonder if the body confuses pork with human meat to a degree and its consumption in its unaltered, unprocessed form is almost like cannibalism. That's my own mind thinking though and it's completely unfounded. But take note of this study.

                How Does Pork Prepared in Various Ways Affect the Blood? - Weston A Price Foundation
                Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post

                  I have my own reserves regarding pork. Its tissue is very, very similar to human tissue. .
                  I've kept quiet on this thread, but that's the basis of my reservations about it too.
                  "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                  In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                  - Ray Peat

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by YogaBare View Post
                    I've kept quiet on this thread, but that's the basis of my reservations about it too.
                    I don't eat very much pork, but it is comforting to know that if I ever have to become a cannibal, at least it will be a tasty experience.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by YogaBare View Post
                      I've kept quiet on this thread, but that's the basis of my reservations about it too.
                      interesting

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Rasputina View Post
                        I don't eat very much pork, but it is comforting to know that if I ever have to become a cannibal, at least it will be a tasty experience.
                        Just make sure you go for the ones who haven't been corn fed!
                        "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                        In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                        - Ray Peat

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                          I have my own reserves regarding pork. Its tissue is very, very similar to human tissue. It makes me wonder if the body confuses pork with human meat to a degree and its consumption in its unaltered, unprocessed form is almost like cannibalism. That's my own mind thinking though and it's completely unfounded.
                          Originally posted by YogaBare View Post
                          I've kept quiet on this thread, but that's the basis of my reservations about it too.
                          Well, that's creepy! Is there evidence that cannibalism is actually unhealthy, as opposed to creepy?
                          50yo, 5'3"
                          SW-195
                          CW-125, part calorie counting, part transition to primal
                          GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by LauraSB View Post
                            Well, that's creepy! Is there evidence that cannibalism is actually unhealthy, as opposed to creepy?
                            Why You Should Eat Human Flesh! | healthkicker
                            "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                            In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                            - Ray Peat

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Lol - I typed "nutrition human flesh" into google. 1,180,000 hits! Clearly an important topic.
                              "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                              In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                              - Ray Peat

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Pork is toxic because of pathogens, in that many bacteria that is harmful to pigs is harmful to humans. Cannibalism is harmful to humans because all bacteria that is harmful to humans is harmful to humans.

                                Kuru is a prion disease that was caused by cannibalistic practices by a New Guinea tribe called Fore. In a similar way that mad cow disease started.

                                Kuru (disease) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                                There are huge species barriers in prion replication, which is confirmed by various tests done on prion transmission.
                                Make America Great Again

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