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Resistant Starch - A Solution In Search of a Problem

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  • So is there any other possible benefit besides insulin sensitivity? I am still not understanding why anyone (Otzi) cares?

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    • Originally posted by Zach View Post
      So is there any other possible benefit besides insulin sensitivity? I am still not understanding why anyone (Otzi) cares?
      I care because Matt Stone cares...Resistant Starch – 180 Degree Health

      Resistant starch, the ultimate “prebiotic” also likely plays a role in the microbial environment of the GI tract as well, changing the microbial environment towards one that fosters colonization by the very type of bacteria associated with leanness, heightened immunity, protection from colon cancer, and so on.

      If I had to choose between taking probiotics or consuming more resistant starch for improving gut flora, I’d go all in on resistant starch as being a more effective route. - matt stone

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      • Originally posted by Zach View Post
        So is there any other possible benefit besides insulin sensitivity? I am still not understanding why anyone (Otzi) cares?
        There are many benefits for why resistant starch contributes to health. It is low glycemic and has a low glycemic and insulin response, it mildly promotes regularity, it reduces ammonia and phenols within the large intestine and helps to eliminate Nitrogen (relief for the kidneys), it triggers the production of satiety hormones so you're less hungry (some studies show 2-3 hours later, but 2 studies show 10-14 hours later), it helps your body to store fat properly in the adipose tissue and it helps the pancreas to produce insulin in insulin resistant people. It does not lower cholesterol (doesn't thicken the intestinal contents at all, which is the mechanism for cholesterol reduction).

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        • Originally posted by RSQueen View Post
          There are many benefits for why resistant starch contributes to health. It is low glycemic and has a low glycemic and insulin response, it mildly promotes regularity, it reduces ammonia and phenols within the large intestine and helps to eliminate Nitrogen (relief for the kidneys), it triggers the production of satiety hormones so you're less hungry (some studies show 2-3 hours later, but 2 studies show 10-14 hours later), it helps your body to store fat properly in the adipose tissue and it helps the pancreas to produce insulin in insulin resistant people. It does not lower cholesterol (doesn't thicken the intestinal contents at all, which is the mechanism for cholesterol reduction).
          Well that was a bunch of half assed benefits. This thread is officially pointless.

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          • Originally posted by Zach View Post
            Well that was a bunch of half assed benefits. This thread is officially pointless.
            The resident genius expert has spoken...let it be done.

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            • Originally posted by Artbuc View Post
              The resident genius expert has spoken...let it be done.
              Indeed.

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              • Originally posted by Artbuc View Post
                The resident genius expert has spoken...let it be done.
                I'm pretty sure that Zach is working off the belief, promoted by Ray Peat and others, that a sterile gut is a happy gut.

                These guys think there should be no yucky bacteria in the intestines. They recommend eating things with anti-bacterial properties, thinking that will kill off all those nasty invaders.

                When you realize just how important the trillions of bacteria that live in our guts are, you tend to take steps that will make a healthy environment for them.

                Read more: Intestinal Bacteria and Obesity – 180 Degree Health

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                • Just the large intestine.

                  my N-1 is without a doubt the lower the starch/meat/fat and higher the sugar, the less inflammation and better i feel.

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                  • Originally posted by otzi View Post
                    Good post, PKlopp, but it begs the question...do you think that the typical PB/Paleo diet contains enough dietary SCFA to reap the benefits you describe?
                    If I knew what "the typical PB/Paleo diet" consisted of, I might be able to answer this question, but I do not. I can, however make some general comments:

                    I assume that the benefits you are referring to relate principally to insulin sensitivity, in which case, assuming your "average" paleoite was eating large amounts of butter, coconut oil, or vinegar, they would be getting quite a bit of dietary medium and short chain fatty acids which would go a long way towards improving insulin sensitivity.

                    My concern here is in chasing some arbitrary result on a test without regard to the larger context: insulin sensitivity vs. overall health. This situation very closely mirrors what happened with respect to lowering cholesterol values with statins. Statins are great at crushing serum cholesterol numbers because they impeded the enzymatic pathways in the liver that are responsible for synthesizing it. It turns out, however, that as cholesterol levels drop beyond a certain level, mortality from causes other than cardiovascular disease increases. The true goal for a reasonable person who is not selling statins should have been to lower all cause mortality rates.

                    When it comes to improving insulin sensitivity, the sure way to do that is by crushing stored glucose and glycogen levels, because the body then becomes desperate to restock, so it will absorb glucose like a sponge in the Sahara absorbs any water available. One way to achieve this end is to suppress beta oxidation, that is, make it impossible for the body to utilize fat at the mitochondrial level, forcing it to rely solely on glucose. Realize that this means that you are running at about 10% energy generation efficiency in this case, which means that any glucose that hits your system will disappear almost as quickly as it appears. You will have the insulin sensitivity of a champion ... but you may die due to hypoglycemia while they test you. Luckily, you would probably be in some health clinic or another where they should recognize what's going on and administer large and ongoing infusion of glucose while they try to figure out what you did to suppress beta oxidation to that extent ( like maybe you were eating unripe ackee tree fruit or something like that ... )

                    If you are an individual who derives a large proportion of their energy from fats rather than carbohydrates, I would expect a degree of physiological insulin insensitivity, and I would not be particularly concerned about it, especially if my glycation levels were normal.

                    Originally posted by otzi View Post
                    You realize your critiques are probably being studied by Starch Moguls so they can stave off further critiques by users which would cut into their multi-billion dollar upstart industrial RS businesses.
                    Nah, they will probably attempt to bury us beneath an avalanche of dubious research. They will then use that as a base for talking heads to point to while proclaiming "the overwhelming weight of the evidence suggests that blah blah blahther blather blah."

                    -PK
                    My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

                    Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

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                    • Originally posted by otzi View Post
                      I care because Matt Stone cares...Resistant Starch 180 Degree Health
                      The thing I like about Matt Stone is how all of his claims are meticulously documented with references ... or perhaps one would need to pay him for access to that?

                      -PK
                      My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

                      Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

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                      • Hi, sorry haven't been following this thread all the way through, there is a lot of talk about potato/green banana starch, is there any inform on how RS1 (RS1 – Physically resists digestion because of a protective matrix or coating surrounding the granules found in whole grains, legumes and seeds.) differs? I tried before cold boiled potatoes, beans and legumes, but didn't get much results on the weight loss front, but recently am trying nuts and seeds, and finding its helping me stay satisfied and noticed some shrinkage / clothes becoming loser.

                        Can someone tell me the difference, I am aware that seeds and nuts are also high in fat and have some protein, but other RS are very low or no fat, could that make a difference?

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                        • Hi Hotmail, This is an old thread. There is another that is currently active where you should ask your question.

                          www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread73514.html
                          Primal since 9/24/2010
                          "Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within." Miguel de Cervantes

                          Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools
                          MFP username: MDAPebbles67

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