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2nd day off the insane caffeine addiction!!!

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  • 2nd day off the insane caffeine addiction!!!

    I'll admit folks, I had an extreme caffeine addiction. I think its when I'm working a lot I end up taking too much to keep me going. I was working 72 hours per week for a while.

    But on top of that, I got into going for the sugar free energy drinks instead of the coffee, because they are cold and have a lot less calories in them as opposed to the cream in the coffee.

    But then it gets worse. Some drinks have way more caffeine in them. Now days in my area, they sell them in larger bottles and give 2 for a cheaper price deals. And yes, if you're dumb enough to fall for such marketing strategies, you end up getting hooked big time, and sick as I'll explain.

    Yesterday I did an all day fast and went cold turkey on the caffeine as well. I ended up with a headache so bad that I couldn't do anything, and I threw up.

    Today I went most of the day without caffeine until I got a headache again. Then I broke and had 2 diet sodas, which is still A LOT less than what I'm normally used to having.

    So I guess going 100% cold turkey was almost too hard. But I think I'm doing ok. Tomorrow I'll go without if I can without getting a headache. If not, I'll just have a small cup of coffee or tea or what ever.

    One thing I can tell you is why I wanted to quit. It made me mad all the time, wired up all the time, and to the point where I felt like I couldn't relax, was anxious, couldn't sleep, would worry about the stupidest things, and so on. And that's saying a lot for a guy who's naturally happy go lucky!!! I felt like crap. I tried exercising more often, but that only helped so much.

    But now after my first day off, I feel A LOT better, even though I had the headache. Mentally I felt much better, much more relaxed, excited about life, happy go lucky (normal) again.

    So anyways, here's the thing. I hear a lot that caffeine is good for you. But that depends on how much you drink. In some countries they drink a lot of tea, and that's probably a healthy amount. In the old days, in the USA, a few cups of coffee seemed normal, and it probably was.

    But as I see it, in highly industrialized societies where people are pressured to keep on going, too much caffein consumption seems normal. Also, the marketing for such products is top notch.

    So to sum up my post, I am very happy with the decision I made. I feel A LOT better. A little bit of caffeine is ok and possibly even good for you. But don't let what happened to me happen to you. It's not a good experience.

    And if you do happen to drink a lot of caffeinated drinks or what ever, I'd highly recommend having a good thought about it and thinking about cutting down greatly. You'll feel a lot better.

    Pretty much what I'm trying to do now is to cut down to zero for a while, then just have a little bit of tea or coffee in the morning or before my workouts, but thats it. Obviously I'm ending up going gradual, but so far I think I'm doing good.

  • #2
    I was in the same boat, drinking 2 Red Bulls and 4 cups of coffee a day. I had chronic insomnia and generally felt like crap. I quit cold turkey on a Friday and felt hungover all weekend. It took about 4 or 5 days to feel well, but it's been worth it. I do miss the first cup in the morning though.

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    • #3
      Now days in my area, they sell them in larger bottles and give 2 for a cheaper price deals. And yes, if you're dumb enough to fall for such marketing strategies, you end up getting hooked big time, and sick as I'll explain.
      Yes, this is something I always remember from a book about saving money: a reduced price doesn't save you money. It makes you buy things you wouldn't have bought otherwise. Unless it is something you have to buy, and most of the time it isn't.

      But as I see it, in highly industrialized societies where people are pressured to keep on going, too much caffein consumption seems normal. Also, the marketing for such products is top notch.
      Actually we work less than when people lived on a farm and worked seven days a week, from sunrise to sunset. No tractors, just you and a rusty plow, and a donkey to help you pull if you were lucky. Backs broken, bad food, no sick days or vacation days or pension. We romanticize that time, but it was not fun to live like that.

      If people didn't need coffee then, we certainly don't need it now. Coffee only makes you feel more awake for what, half an hour? If you get a good night's sleep you don't need coffee. And thanks to the large amount of free time we have every day now, unlike when you worked the fields until it was time to crash, everyone has time to get a good night's sleep. I work hard and never need coffee. I have some once in a while anyway, though. Nobody is perfect.

      What helps me keep coffee consumption down is to remember that it gives you wrinkles. Do I want permanent wrinkles just because of some cups of coffee that won't be permanent? No. Same reasoning helped me give up sugary stuff, which also helps give you wrinkles, although I don't remember why right now. It is also a good reason to mention to your girlfriend when you want her to quit! Know your target audience.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Erik W View Post
        Actually we work less than when people lived on a farm and worked seven days a week, from sunrise to sunset. No tractors, just you and a rusty plow, and a donkey to help you pull if you were lucky. Backs broken, bad food, no sick days or vacation days or pension. We romanticize that time, but it was not fun to live like that.
        I used to work a construction job, and now I work an office job, so I know the difference. Physical work sucks, especially when you work your but off physically with little pay to show for it. That part sucks the most.

        But compare to an office job. It's different. Some office jobs can have A LOT more mental stress because of high expectations and pressures. They also provide zero stress relief (physical activity) as with a construction job. And yes, some office jobs expect you to work serious hours such as 60-72 hours per week; yep, I've done it. Good luck working like that and having enough time for exercise!!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Erik W View Post
          Actually we work less than when people lived on a farm and worked seven days a week, from sunrise to sunset. No tractors, just you and a rusty plow, and a donkey to help you pull if you were lucky. Backs broken, bad food, no sick days or vacation days or pension. We romanticize that time, but it was not fun to live like that.
          Yeah, but that's still a post-agriculture bullshit lifestyle, same situation as with now but with poorer technology. Going back much further in time, HG's are reported to have had relatively leisurely lifestyles.

          Modern first-worlders are the most overworked and overstressed people on the planet, and yet we're also told that we're the most cozy and privileged. It makes for a lot of unfortunate cognitive dissonance.
          “The whole concept of a macronutrient, like that of a calorie, is determining our language game in such a way that the conversation is not making sense." - Dr. Kurt Harris

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          • #6
            Congrats to the OP for kicking a self destructive habit to the curb.

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            • #7
              Caffeine is a vasoconstrictor, so caffeine withdrawal headaches are actually caused by the blood vessels dilating back to normal. I also couldn't bear the headaches; were I to try to kick caffeine, I would probably wean myself off with smaller and smaller portions of caffeine pills. Otherwise, those headaches are absolutely horrible. I don't get migraines, but those are the worst headaches I've ever had.
              29/F
              5'4.5
              Highest weight: 220
              Starting weight: 195
              Current weight: 179
              Goal weight: 127

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              • #8
                The headaches - lasting for a few days or more - are absolutely evil and have thwarted my attempts again and again to kick caffeine for good.
                Meat is Prized, Wheat is Despised.

                Real Food - The REAL staff of life

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                • #9
                  I'm on day 6, with a bad headache, and HAVE had a cup here and there when my head just gets too foggy, but less than one cup a day. Gotta make more tea, I guess!
                  Crohn's, doing SCD

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                  • #10
                    I'm having enough to take care of all you quitting . I've quit before, but I'm inching my way back to 3-4 cups a day. May be time to dial it back again.

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                    • #11
                      I think caffeine is an individual thing. There are those that say that caffeine is evil for everyone and should immediately be cut, but I've come to believe that it's all about how you respond to it. If it gives you insomnia or bad jitters, or you can't concentrate on your work as a result, then yeah, you should probably cut it. Not a bad idea!

                      On the other hand, if you sleep well, don't seem to get overly jittery, feel energized from it rather than agitated, then you can probably keep it without issue. Sometimes, all it takes to solve the issue is cutting back. Four cups of coffee or tea doing you in? Try one or two cups for a while and see if you don't feel better.

                      Some people do horrible on caffeine, other people do extremely well. It all depends. It's one of those things that can actually be extremely GOOD for some people, and can also be the worst thing EVER for others. Also, the key is to respect that it IS a drug and not abuse it.
                      "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cantat View Post
                        Caffeine is a vasoconstrictor, so caffeine withdrawal headaches are actually caused by the blood vessels dilating back to normal. I also couldn't bear the headaches; were I to try to kick caffeine, I would probably wean myself off with smaller and smaller portions of caffeine pills. Otherwise, those headaches are absolutely horrible. I don't get migraines, but those are the worst headaches I've ever had.
                        Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

                        Caffeine is metabolized into more than 25 metabolites in humans, mainly Paraxanthine, Theobromine, and Theophylline [12] Caffeine metabolism yields paraxanthine as a final product, which represents 72 to 80% of caffeine metabolism. There are five main metabolic pathways which contribute to caffeine metabolism in adults [13, 14]. The first three consist of demethylization of N-3 to form Paraxanthine, N-1 to form Theophylline (vasodilator, increased cerebral and muscular blood flow), and N-7 to form Theophylline (vascular, bronchiole, muscular, and respiratory relaxant). The hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isoenzyme metabolizes most of the caffeine (95%) by three demethylizations which on average give an in vivo metabolism percentage of 85% paraxanthine, 10% theobromine, and 5% theophylline [15]. The fourth pathway results in the formation of uracil metabolites, and the fifth consists of renal elimination of the remaining percentage of caffeine that was not able to be degraded in the process. The large interindividual differences observed in plasmatic concentration of caffeine following the administration of an equal dose are mainly due to variations in metabolism. These variations depend on four factors: genetic polymorphisms, metabolic induction and inhibition of cytochrome P-450, individual (weight, sex), and the presence of hepatic diseases [14] Caffeine is absorbed rapidly and completely from the intestinal tract, making it 100% bioavailable. The time in which maximum plasmatic concentration is obtained (Tmax) is 30–45 minutes [11, 14, 16, 17] fasting and is delayed with food ingestion; it has an average metabolic half life in humans of 2.5 to 4.5 hours [18]

                        Caffeine, by acting on the VSMC, generates a minimal initial contraction and then a significant vasodilator effect. There are various mechanisms that explain these effects.

                        Caffeine, by competitively blocking the adenosine receptors, increases its plasmatic concentration [64] which increases its systemic effects. At a systemic level, adenosine stimulates the chemoreceptor distributed throughout the circulation, causing a generalized increase in sympathetic tone, with an increase in circulating catecholamines, peripheral vascular resistance, and renin secretion [44, 65]. Several studies have documented an increase in systolic arterial pressure of 6 to 7.5 mmHg and 2.6 to 4 mmHg in diastolic pressure 60 minutes after the administration of 300 mg of caffeine (equivalent to drinking a triple espresso) [18, 43]. In spite of this “indirect” vasoconstrictor effect produced by caffeine, it is important to point out that the chronic consumption of caffeine creates a tolerance to its adenosine receptor-dependent effects. Chronic blocking of the adenosine receptors, inducing “upregulation” (an increase in the number and sensitivity) of the receptors has been described with a low-moderate caffeine consumption (approximately two cups of coffee for more than 5 days) [66].
                        Caffeine is a vasodilator

                        There is no clear conclusion that migraines can be caused by caffeine. Adenosine has opposite effects depending on its site of action; centrally, in the brain and spinal cord, adenosine acts as an analgesic, but peripherally it can cause pain. Adenosine dilates blood vessels in the head and neck. The concentration of adenosine in the head and neck increases approximately 68% above normal concentrations during migraine episodes, causing vasodilation and pain [73].The nervous system compensates the interference of caffeine by releasing more adenosine, increasing the number of adenosine receptors in the neuron surface, increasing the affinity of these receptors and decreasing the rate at which adenosine molecules are removed. All these changes tend to increase the activation of adenosine receptors, to compensate the receptors occupied by caffeine.Caffeine is also a common ingredient in many medications used for treating migraines, due to the fact that it makes analgesics work more efficiently, causes a faster absorption, and allows for a reduced dosage which decreases possible side effects of certain analgesics.
                        Also, as caffeine inhibits serotonin(which aggravates migraines) it's particularly effective at protecting against them.

                        Caffeine: A vitamin-like nutrient, or adaptogen. Questions about tea and coffee, cancer and other degenerative diseases, and the hormones.

                        Sick of this wrongful mainstream sensationalist smear campaign against one of the best health substances around.
                        Make America Great Again

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                        • #13
                          Derp, I read an interesting study once that I might have to see if I can find again that gave conflicting evidence for caffeine's effect on the vascular system.

                          On the one hand, they said it was a vasoconstrictor in the brain as scans of the brain after subjects had injected coffee or tea showed extreme restriction of the veins and arteries there. Yet, at the same time, in areas lower (everywhere else), the veins got wider and seemed to dilate as a result of the caffeine intake. They post outlasted that the headaches that some people feel from intake of caffeine could be related to the fact that once the caffeine wears off, the vessels and arteries in the brain dialogue and combined with the extra dilation of the rest of the body's vascular system caused a massive rush of blood to the brain for a short period that causes a slight increase in cranial pressure for a short period.

                          I'm not totally straight on the science of that but it makes sense if it's true.
                          "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It's in there. It's an indirect cerebral vasoconstriction by antagonizing adenosine receptors. There was something of note further down there too.

                            In spite of this “indirect” vasoconstrictor effect produced by caffeine, it is important to point out that the chronic consumption of caffeine creates a tolerance to its adenosine receptor-dependent effects. Chronic blocking of the adenosine receptors, inducing “upregulation” (an increase in the number and sensitivity) of the receptors has been described with a low-moderate caffeine consumption (approximately two cups of coffee for more than 5 days)
                            JCI - Chronic caffeine ingestion sensitizes the A1 adenosine receptor-adenylate cyclase system in rat cerebral cortex.
                            Make America Great Again

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Derpamix View Post

                              Sick of this wrongful mainstream sensationalist smear campaign against one of the best health substances around.
                              Good lord, chill out. I wasn't waging a smear campaign; I don't even have strong feelings about caffeine one way or the other - except that, when I temporarily cut it out, I get the worst headaches I've ever had, without fail. It's not a coincidence. Health benefits or no, headaches are hella lame!
                              29/F
                              5'4.5
                              Highest weight: 220
                              Starting weight: 195
                              Current weight: 179
                              Goal weight: 127

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