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Frustrated... Lets eat seasonally then.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by sarasue624 View Post
    My farm folk grandparents stockpiled sweet potatoes and onions for winter. They lasted perfectly on the cool floor of a cellar all winter. There's probably a reason meat and potato stew is considered winter food.
    I'd like to know at what temp we're talking cause mine go south within a week or two in the house at about 65 degreed F.

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    • #17
      I don't know if it specifically aids weight loss, but I would think eating seasonally wouldn't hurt and it actually might help. Although nothing grows in winter where I live, so I tend to stick with the idea that it is ok to eat if it is in season somewhere in the country. I know the actual primal people of this area would have stuck to only potatoes and the like during the winter with lots of meat, but I'd have a hard time handling that! I try for cabbage, brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, kale, and leeks in particular in these months.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
        I can't say that I consciously eat seasonally, but I'm noticing that I haven't really been in the mood for much fruit since the cold weather started. Also, when it comes to produce, especially with the price of organic produce, I shop deals, so I think I might be eating what's abundant at any given time of the year. Major exception is tomato, which I eat in various forms all year 'round.
        Now that you mention it, I haven't been in a fruit mood since it got colder. That's very interesting! My protein cravings have sky-rocketed, though.
        January 14th-306.2
        January 21st, lost 2" off my waist.
        January 30th-300.2

        Come to the edge she said.
        No, I'll fall.
        Come to the edge.
        No, it's too high.
        Come to the edge.
        I came
        She pushed
        And I flew

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        • #19
          A good root cellar or even a modern cellar can have temperatures down between 40-50 degrees F. The temperatures very from floor to ceiling, and also vary cellar to cellar based on depth.

          Many modern houses are built on platforms, so the actual "ceiling" of the "basement/cellar" is higher than ground level. Other homes are build on the ground level, or even slightly below (with footings below ground level and sealed for moisture), with cellars having vents or other entry points outside of the house (which allows for ventilation).

          The deeper below ground the cellar goes, the cooler it can be. Many traditional root cellars are built into hillsides, as they tend to have more insulation from the earth above, keeping them more consistently cooler.

          One of the most impressive root cellars that I have seen was at an amish farm in PA. The main root cellar was large -- built into a hill -- and it had a second room that had a running spring. they kept the spring running, but bricked the little room.

          The spring room was easily 35-40 degrees F, and then the main root cellar -- which was massive -- was closer to 45-50 depending upon where you were in the room. The spring room was not only used for clean water, but it was also used as cold storage for dairy products like butter, milk, cream, etc, as well as meats that were processed but were to be cooked/eaten later that week, or further processed in other ways.

          Truly, it was a sight to behold!

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          • #20
            I'm gonna go against the stream and say that I don't think seasonal eating is really gonna help you cut the weight. It might, it might not, but at the end of the line all the carb-heavy fruits come into season during the autumn. That's the time when all the mammals begin to put on some fat to last them through the winter. This is true for carnivores and omnivores alike.

            Season eating might help, yes, but if you gorge down apples and veggies just because they are in season, you probably won't lose much weight at all. It comes down to common sense. Of course it also depend on where you live, since far from everywhere on Earth actually see harsh winters with temperatures below freezing point like we do over here.

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            • #21
              Now that I live in the south, I keep my potatoes in the veggie bins in the fridge, but I take them out of the plastic bags. When I lived in central WA state, I could keep them in the "mudroom" almost all year except June, July, and August. I could keep eggs in the mudroom from about Oct/Nov through early April. In central WA, we used to say we had three seasons: Fall, Winter, and August.

              If I am eating seasonally, I think the health benefits would be through variety.

              Asmodeuskraemer, I haven't noticed that I want to eat more meat, but potatoes seem to have replaced my yen for fruit.
              "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

              B*tch-lite

              Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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              • #22
                Thank y'all for your input. Brought up interesting points that something is always in season somewhere... lol
                Earthy Mama's Journal

                "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" ~ Hippocrates

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Reindeer View Post
                  I'm gonna go against the stream and say that I don't think seasonal eating is really gonna help you cut the weight. It might, it might not, but at the end of the line all the carb-heavy fruits come into season during the autumn. That's the time when all the mammals begin to put on some fat to last them through the winter. This is true for carnivores and omnivores alike.
                  And there's the key, especially to diabetes. Animals eat a bunch of fat-creating foods all fall, they actually become insulin resistant to help, and somewhat into the winter, then they get sleepy, slow, and very, very cold, with low light levels and little to no produce as the winter wears on. That's when the fat that they put on burns off as it sustains them and they go on to a lean, reproductive spring.

                  We do the same thing, at least in the fall. Our problem is we keep those high carb levels, higher temps, & higher light levels all year long (often with winter-like activity levels), and the mismatch between them all keeps us in fall (diabetic) mode all year long. At least, it does for a lot of us. Not everyone is predisposed for this to happen.

                  IDK, it's a theory that makes sense to me.


                  Doesn't Bernstein recommend you track your blood sugar after everything to see what you can eat? I would think that would tell you whether fall/winter produce is appropriate for you or not.
                  5'4" 39yo mother to five sweeties & married to their AMAZING DaddyGrok
                  Current Weight: 175lb__________________________________Goal: 135lb
                  Deadlift: 240lb________________________________________Back Squat: 165lb
                  Bench: 130lb__________________________________________Pre ss: 85lb
                  ***Winning a 20-year war against binge eating disorder***

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                  • #24
                    I think the main benefit to eating seasonally is that when you eat locally you are eating better quality foods and supporting local agriculture. With a closer, more personal relationship with your farmer, you can support his efforts to do things in a more environmentally sound manner or exert economic pressure on him if he isn't a good steward to the land and his animals. Eating less locally you don't even know if that's real olive oil or real honey. You can be cheated, the environment can be cheated, the animals can be abused.
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                    • #25
                      Doesn't Bernstein recommend you track your blood sugar after everything to see what you can eat? I would think that would tell you whether fall/winter produce is appropriate for you or not.
                      Yes, as does Dr. Davis. I had quit doing this but am starting again. I can't afford to play around
                      You know all those things you wanted to do: You should go do them.

                      Age 48
                      height 5'3
                      SW 215 lbs
                      CW 180 lbs (whole foods/primal eating)
                      LW 172 lbs
                      GW 125ish lbs

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                      • #26
                        this is for pattyloo: go to the main MDA page and click "start here" - dont try to start with this forum, it'll drive you nuts...

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