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  • Foods for long distance walk

    Hi Everyone,

    This is my first post and I am almost done reading through the PB. As part of my job during the summer months in the UK I lead a local long distance walk - its tough and is 28 miles. It normally takes with a group 13 hours.

    In the past I have fuelled this walk on wholegrain bread with a variety of fillings, flapjacks, energy bars, isotonic sports drinks.

    At this point I am not going to be going fully 'primal' I am using the 6 Pillars of Nutrition as my guide (which shares many similarities to primal eating apart from starch containing foods can be consumed in the morning to replenish glycogen from sleeping and after exercise).

    I am intrested to know what foods people would suggest whilst on the walk to keep energy levels going apart from lots of grains?

    Many thanks
    Wayne

  • #2
    I went on a week long backpacking trip this past summer and used alot of nut/dried fruit mix and dried meat... also had some packaged soups, Snickers, oatmeal and dried milk stuff (was in Mongolia, got this from some people who gave it too us along the way). To make this more "primal" I'd try to increase dried meat and maybe have some homemade soup mix type stuff to replace the oatmeal and snickers... also maybe some dried cheese but if in Mongolia i'd do the dried curds again too.

    Looking forward to others' thoughts!

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    • #3
      It's just a day hike? You can bring any food you want on a day hike and you can even fast the entire day if you want. No need for special food.

      If it's an overnight, I bring along dehydrated vegetables and meat (such as dehydrated canned chicken--I have a home dehydrator). I can either soak this in water in a plastic peanut butter jar for a few hours and eat it cold, perhaps add some olive oil, salt and pepper, or else I will heat it up on my backpacking stove and melt in some beef tallow or pemmican.

      Vegetables I've dehydrated include cooked, mashed sweet potatoes and celery root, cooked beets, raw beet greens, raw carrot slices, raw corn kernels, raw diced zucchini.
      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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      • #4
        +1 for trying it fasted, if you're fat adapted.

        otherwise, nuts, jerky and fruit are great for day hikes. not only do you want primal foods, but you want something easy to carry that is calorie dense.
        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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        • #5
          I used a larabar during my half marathons this summer. Was fine until I got home and had a more square meal, and then we would go out to a nice dinner later.
          --Trish (Bork)
          TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
          http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
          FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

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          • #6
            I understand you are a guide for a long walking tour, so i presume you are walking 28 miles several days a week during your summer job?

            In that case.. I totally understand you don't want to do that fasted everytime!!
            My personal choice would be: nuts & fruit; a thermos with soup; bite of beef jerky. Maybe it is more comfortable to do your walk fasted until lunch time then take a good filling primal snack like the suggestions given by shbikes and others? (like pemmican)

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            • #7
              Leading a long distance walk as part of your job actually sounds very nice! Are you in tourism or nature preservation?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by primalrob View Post
                +1 for trying it fasted, if you're fat adapted.
                Or you could try it almost fasted. I regularly walk 6 miles (two times around Green Lake in Seattle). That hardly compares to 28 miles but I accidently learned a trick you may want to try. Sometimes I get hungry on my second lap and feel like I can't keep going. Because of that I used to carry a snack just in case I got too hungry. One day though I hit the wall without a snack. I did have a piece of hard candy in my pocket though. After about a minute of sucking I was no longer hungry even though I had only ingested about 1 of the 10 calories in that piece of candy. So far that trick has worked for me every time.

                I don't know why it works. Others might have insight.

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                • #9
                  Berkoe1

                  I dont do walks that far anymore and not with the weight i used to carry in my pack. Advice i received when i was young from my Dad was to carry a few small onions, carrots and potatoes in the pack to cook up at the end of a day. This idea was for long walks over a few days to weeks.
                  I also used to carry a salami stick and cut a small piece off at the end of the day and chew it for as long as i could.
                  A trail mix, nuts and dried fruit are great and even better if you throw a few chocolate buttons in as well.
                  I would go the jerky option for sure as i think not only can you eat as you go but you can also add to a decent cook up, or boil in water with the above for a big filling soup.

                  The hardest thing is to carry what is in your current eating plan. Non perishable vegies for a soup at the end of the day would win for me.
                  Ana-Tane = (Cave Man)

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                  • #10
                    Berkoe1

                    I dont do walks that far anymore and not with the weight i used to carry in my pack. Advice i received when i was young from my Dad was to carry a few small onions, carrots and potatoes in the pack to cook up at the end of a day. This idea was for long walks over a few days to weeks.
                    I also used to carry a salami stick and cut a small piece off at the end of the day and chew it for as long as i could.
                    A trail mix, nuts and dried fruit are great and even better if you throw a few chocolate buttons in as well.
                    I would go the jerky option for sure as i think not only can you eat as you go but you can also add to a decent cook up, or boil in water with the above for a big filling soup.

                    The hardest thing is to carry what is in your current eating plan. Non perishable vegies for a soup at the end of the day would win for me.
                    Ana-Tane = (Cave Man)

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                    • #11
                      I'm actually quite amazed you can take a group out for a 28 mile hike and get it done in 13 hours. That's faster than 2 miles an hour. And you do it with a group? That's incredible. It's hard enough to do it solo or with just one other person.

                      Anyway, if you do 28 mile hikes daily you're going to have to eat a lot of food. Daily marathons will make you very hungry within a couple of weeks.
                      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                      • #12
                        Shbikes, I am not certain if it is an international or a Belgian-Dutch cultural thing, but there are a lot (like in every small town!) of '4daysies' or '5daysies' or '6daymarches' being organized in the Netherlands during spring and summer, mostly take place on 4 evenings in a row (not exceeding 10 miles per evening usually) but others in nature (along the coastline) or for longer distances (originally military and mass-events, not my preference but that is the only link i could find in English, sorry International Four Days Marches Nijmegen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). You also have long nightwalks (14 hours) or even 24hour walks.

                        I have truly no idea if this is also an American or English practice? Anyways, I suspect the topic opener is leading such kind of a local event, and the walking pace is over 3 to 4 miles per hour excluding rests, which would make an average of just over 2 miles per hour sound plausible. Usually, there is only one or two small (soup) breaks and a big meal at the end.

                        Sorry, I went a bit off topic, but i thought it to be a curious relict of military marches.
                        Vierdaagse van de IJzer Subject Organization Pagina 15

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                        • #13
                          You could take veggies just to eat raw, too. Most would be OK even sitting in your bag all day (right? I mean at least the ones that sit out of refrigeration all day at the store anyway?) A whole avocado could be good.

                          This sounds really cool. Also, the official '4daagse' site does have an English option if anyone else wants to look

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                          • #14
                            I frequently ski tour long days and go on long hikes as well in the summer time. I find that jerky, dried fruit and nuts are too dehydrating on my system and try to reserve them for times when I'm out for multiple days in a row or use them in small quantities. I often pack a baked yam with coconut oil/cinnamon, left over meat (chicken breast, steak), grilled sausage, apples with nut butter ect. I try to keep things fresh and easy.

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                            • #15
                              Hello Everyone,

                              Thank you to everyone for commenting on the post. A lot of very useful advice. Some people asked what sort of job this was part of. In the UK most Local Authorities have a Walking for Health Project (although many are under threat with the Government cut backs). The Walking for Health Projects are aimed at setting up and leading short walks in the community mainly aimed at people who are not exercising - this fits nicely with the PB exercise-

                              Many of the walks are tailored to specific groups such as adults with learning difficulties as well as adults with mental health problems.

                              As part of keeping my job in the future I now also have to make a bit of income hence the long distance walk aimed more at your 'walker types'
                              Thanks agan everyone,
                              Wayne

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