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How can a vegetarian follow the Primal Blue Print?

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  • How can a vegetarian follow the Primal Blue Print?

    Hello Everyone

    Need your help on this. I have been following MDA for the past 12 months. The following has been nagging me all along.

    I am a vegetarian (Hindu, from India). No meat/sea food/eggs. Due to family reasons don't see this changing (maybe would be able to introduce eggs). My diet is heavily focussed on carbs (Rice, vegetables, legumes, dairy etc..)

    Any suggestions or support on how I can sustain a primal blue print?

    Let me know if you need any additional information to help you with your response.

    Regards

  • #2
    I am primarily vegetarian, I do eat a crap ton of eggs, though, and a lot of Greek yogurt; that's how I get most of my protein. I'm not vegetarian officially, it's just that my tastes in food runs in cycles and lately I haven't been craving much meat.
    F 28/5'4/100 lbs

    "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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    • #3
      A carb focus is kind of tough on primal. It'd mean a lot of starchy tubers and fruit but then you might have issues getting adequate protein. Beans aren't really the worst thing you could be eating, but they aren't recommended on the diet as a first choice for protein. Your protein, unless you could get some eggs into the diet would have to be almost ALL dairy with maybe some nuts, seeds, and the occasional dose of beans. Full fat Greek yoghurt would become a close friend to you in this style of eating, just avoid brands with added sugars. Kefir would be good too, as would small amounts of cheese on occasion. Pumpkin seeds and hemp seeds could be taken for some extra protein, like a handful every day or two.

      Meat, even for those who eat tons of veggies and fruits, is really the focal point of the diet for the quality and digestibility of their proteins. Plant sources, while maybe necessary for some, just can't hold up to the bioavailability found from animal proteins. You could do sort of a modified primal diet, easy to cut out grains and bad oils and still be vegetarian, coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil, and FULL fat dairy (raw if possible) for healthy fats, use butter, ghee, ect. Tubers and fruits for carbs, though primal, even for those who consume the most carbs around here, is likely WAY less than you've been consuming up to now.

      Protein is, as stated above, the real kicker. See if you can incorporate eggs into the diet (they'll become a staple if you can) and I suppose you'll almost be forced to consume dairy to get some good animal proteins so it'll be hard to experiment with dropping it any point. Oh well, make the best of things, right? Good luck!
      Last edited by Drumroll; 01-03-2013, 03:25 AM.
      "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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      • #4
        I feel like you can still embrace primal living as a vegetarian. I was a junk food vegetarian for years.....
        However, I think you need to experiment and find diverse sources of protein for yourself. Diverse is the key- what can you pull from? Yogurt, paneer, maybe eggs, can you have fish? Then what can you throw in on occasion- maybe some beans?

        What can you cut out? Sugar, maybe eat less rice, skip grainy breads, eat more vegetables. More fruits. Really keep out the processed stuff.

        And make sure you look at the sleep and exercise.

        I think it is important to keep in mind that Primal is NOT ABOUT RESTRICTING CARBS. It's about avoiding toxic foods a lot of which are high in carbs. A giant plate of veggie curry with paneer served over sweet potatoes may be higher in carb than a steak and spinach but it is no less primal.

        http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
        Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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        • #5
          Another thing I think too many people overlook(including myself) is getting enough natural light, and avoiding artificial light at night. Primal is about more than food choices.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by magnolia1973 View Post
            can you have fish?
            If I read the post right, seafood is out of the question. AND no eggs (at least for now) which ONLY leaves dairy for animal protein. Not impossible to work with, but it'll make things tough.
            "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

            Comment


            • #7
              A lot of good advice here so far.

              As a reference:

              1 cup whole milk has 8 grams of protein
              1 cup whole milk yogurt has 8.5 grams of protein

              If you can add in eggs (because nothing is killed?), each large chicken egg has about 6.3 grams of protein.

              Do the best you can. Avoid chemical additives and added sugar and you're most of the way there as far as eating.

              Good luck to you!
              "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

              B*tch-lite

              Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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              • #8
                I too am/was a vegetarian. For over 30 years. I still have a big problem with eating meat, mostly having to do with the way it is produced in this country (US). Beyond the political and environmental reasons, I just no longer have a taste for it. I can't imagine eating a steak. That said, I have become, as someone else put it, a "junk food vegetarian." The bulk of my daily calories seems to come from bread and cheese. And beer.

                By chance I had a conversation with a guy who pointed me to Mark and his books. I had already read "Why We Get Fat" by Gary Taubes and it seemed to make a lot of sense. I had already experimented with some high protein and fat eating (with the addition of fish and turkey), and I not only lost weight but I had more energy and my ever-present joint aches subsided.

                I am by no means an evangelist for Primal, as I haven't followed it for any length of time. I am still quite conflicted about eating meat, and have limited it to turkey and fish. I eat eggs and always have. I eat full fat yogurt and even add some protein powder to it. I would like to give it a try and lose weight and feel better, but then go back to vegetarianism, without the junk.

                You did not mention your reasons for trying Primal. Perhaps more detail will help others help you. I would also be interested in their responses.

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                • #9
                  If meat, seafood, and eggs are precluded, that sounds like vegan + dairy pretty much? You can still apply the Primal way of eating by eliminating or greatly reducing industrial oils, sugar, and grains.

                  Rice and white potatoes are something of a grey zone for many Primals, with some avoiding, and some embracing. Other diets similar to Primal (e.g. the Perfect Health Diet) actually endorse these as "safe starches."

                  Problem areas might include protein and sources of B-12. You can Google vegan sources of protein, but use of nut butters and hemp seed seem to be good adds. You should definitely supplement B-12, and I would suggest supplementing K-2 as well.

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                  • #10
                    Perhaps the better question to ask is: "If the dietary restrictions that my superstitions impose on me are preventing me from being as healthy as possible, is it time to ignore the superstitions and do what is best for myself"?

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                    • #11
                      Sounds like you are a lacto-vegetarian.

                      It all comes down to your ability to get quality protein and fats. Which I don't think would be too hard, as long as you are getting lots of butter/cream/milk/yoghurt.

                      Traditional indian foods are awesome and tasty ways to eat these.
                      Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                      Griff's cholesterol primer
                      5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                      Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                      TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                      bloodorchid is always right

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Scientist View Post
                        Perhaps the better question to ask is: "If the dietary restrictions that my superstitions impose on me are preventing me from being as healthy as possible, is it time to ignore the superstitions and do what is best for myself"?
                        I don't think there's any reason to denigrate someone's religion. The OP is asking for nutritional help here, not a religious debate.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The Scientist View Post
                          Perhaps the better question to ask is: "If the dietary restrictions that my superstitions impose on me are preventing me from being as healthy as possible, is it time to ignore the superstitions and do what is best for myself"?
                          It's uncalled for to call someone's religion "superstitions." Extremely rude.

                          FYI: Fage Greek yogurt contains 23g of protein per serving.
                          F 28/5'4/100 lbs

                          "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by cherylg28 View Post
                            I don't think there's any reason to denigrate someone's religion. The OP is asking for nutritional help here, not a religious debate.
                            I'll use an extreme example (same principle, though) to illustrate how silly your statement is. What if a 14-year old girl from a hard line Muslim family came to you and said "I have to be married to this middle aged psychopathic rapist because my family insisted on it, and my religion says I can't divorce him. Do you have any ideas for how to not die from the trauma without breaking my religious beliefs?"

                            Would you be polite and suggest some aspirin?

                            People are way to polite about religion. If she was avoiding healthy foods for political reasons, nobody would hesitate to confront it, but religion gets a free pass because it requires "faith". What an entirely overrated concept.

                            I wasn't trying to debate religion, just raising an important question that needed to be put out there.
                            Last edited by The Scientist; 01-03-2013, 01:47 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Damiana View Post
                              It's uncalled for to call someone's religion "superstitions." Extremely rude.
                              Supersition: Noun. A widely held but unjustified belief in supernatural causation leading to certain consequences of an action or event, or a practice based on such a belief.

                              How does that not fit?

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