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Fat burning vs carb use

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  • #16
    way to listen to your body! seriously. i think rippetoe's stuff is great for explaining proper technique and mechanics. but i jump ship when it comes to the progression & timing aspects.

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    • #17
      Thanks for all the info, I certainly get the basics now that fat takes longer to break down therefore low intensity activity is considered more likely to use fat reserves, and the higher the intensity, the more of the glucose in your blood and liver you will use. I can see that whilst it looks likely that the body can 'learn' to burn more fat this is probably merely through getting fitter at lower intensity activity and there comes a point where glucose/glycogen has to be used up faster if you begin to sprint or lift. I've noticed that whilst I may be out for the count after a long walk, the next morning I'm ok, presumably because my body had the time to break down more fat to replace energy.

      Interesting that its mentioned that the body will use protein from muscle tissue as an energy source, does it do this BEFORE accessing fat cells?

      Also, and I'm just taking a pot shot here, but is it the case that one of the functions the body performs during sleep is to mine the fat reserves for energy so you wake up with good blood sugar levels, especially if you haven't eaten a lot of carbs the previous day? This would make sense in that it seems it probably takes time for the body to do this, ie a period of hours.
      Last edited by Owen; 12-27-2012, 10:06 AM.
      Healthy is the new wealthy.

      http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Owen View Post
        Thanks for all the info, I certainly get the basics now that fat takes longer to break down therefore low intensity activity is considered more likely to use fat reserves, and the higher the intensity, the more of the glucose in your blood and liver you will use. I can see that whilst it looks likely that the body can 'learn' to burn more fat this is probably merely through getting fitter at lower intensity activity and there comes a point where glucose/glycogen has to be used up faster if you begin to sprint or lift. I've noticed that whilst I may be out for the count after a long walk, the next morning I'm ok, presumably because my body had the time to break down more fat to replace energy.

        Interesting that its mentioned that the body will use protein from muscle tissue as an energy source, does it do this BEFORE accessing fat cells?

        Also, and I'm just taking a pot shot here, but is it the case that one of the functions the body performs during sleep is to mine the fat reserves for energy so you wake up with good blood sugar levels, especially if you haven't eaten a lot of carbs the previous day? This would make sense in that it seems it probably takes time for the body to do this, ie a period of hours.

        Well, to be perfectly frank....even when we break it down to hormones and speak "tech talk" we are doing the body a disservice. It is so much more complicated than we can articulate that its not even funny. The people who are on the cutting edge of this stuff and make it their living have more questions than they do answers.

        So it is far easier to speak in relatively general terms. Yes at low intensity levels you preferentially run on fat oxidation. At higher levels the percentage of energy coming from glucose increases. As jakey pointed out....shifting your diet toward one or the other may increase how much of that one you use. Also, if you eat a ton of carbs (think frutarian) then you will need to convert some of that to fat. If you eat only protein and fat you will have to convert some of that to glucose.....you, however do not convert anything to amino acids! So eat some protein!

        Your blood glucose is regulated primarily with liver glycogen. This is your brains glucose supply. Muscle glycogen is essentially locked up in the muscles and not available for the brain. When you rest you will refill both via gluconeogenesis if you don't get them from your diet. The protein for gluconeogenisis can come from your diet or your lean mass. So if you are low carb be sure to get the 1g/lb of lean mass like Mark recommends. Or eat enough starch to feed your activity level. The ketosis method reduces your need for glucose in half....so you now meet half of your need with ketones.

        I think that is about it for the 101 course. Beyond that your gonna have to read some books. The "fat burner" thing as Mark puts it is a healthy flexible metabolism in which you have access to and burn fat when you should. So we are talking about a prescriptive plan to combat and reverse metabolic syndrome for the most part. I think sbhikes links are pretty good. I don't know about his theory on the predominance of certain fiber types, but I certainly agree with his theory on the frequency and type of exercise determining where you should be getting your fuel from.
        Last edited by Neckhammer; 12-27-2012, 10:42 AM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
          The "fat burner" thing as Mark puts it is a healthy flexible metabolism in which you have access to and burn fat when you should. So we are talking about a prescriptive plan to combat and reverse metabolic syndrome for the most part.
          This just about sums up what I was hoping for - I have already seen fantastic results in just 4 weeks in terms of weight loss and general energy for daily life - but found that I'd actually lost stamina. Whilst I don't mourn it, given the other benefits, it prompted me to ask the question about becoming a fat burner over time, because I do often enjoy going for a long bike ride, and sometimes go on day-long hikes, which have been curtailed whilst my body (hopefully) changes over.

          Its clear that there is a lot of knowledge here and the enquiries and discussions here are amazingly erudite presumably something that comes from a shared goal that everyone is aiming for - whatever questions I ask on here are really peripheral to the fact that I feel awesome as of 4 weeks ago.
          Healthy is the new wealthy.

          http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

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          • #20
            I can tell you from personal experience that when I first went primal, running became impossibly hard for me. Well, not impossibly, not really because I kept at it. It was just very unpleasant. What used to be a comfortable pace became very challenging. Anyway, suddenly one day I realized that my morning run was easy even though I was in ketosis at the time. Wheee! I think the thing that really helped me get there was switching my workout schedule from night to morning, i.e., working out in a fasted state (13- to 14-hour fasts, in my case because I usually stop eating around 5 or 6 pm and get to the gym around 7 am).

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