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making raw butter

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  • making raw butter

    Anybody try to do it out of raw milk?

    Thanks

  • #2
    yes. It's a lot of work but that's the only butter I will eat. I don't trust any manufacturer to make my butter.

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    • #3
      I did this for the first time a few days ago. For some reason the milk I got last week had a TON of cream on top so I decided to make butter.

      I let it culture at room temperature for about 18 hours and then tried to churn it. It whipped up slightly, but never separated. So I chilled it in the freezer for a little while and tried again. It never did make whipped cream like I usually get. It increased in volume and went directly to the butter/buttermilk stage.

      I got maybe a 1/4 cup of butter from about 2 cups of cream. The milk was from Jersey cows. I've heard that different breeds have different size fat globules in their milk, so maybe that plays a role.

      All that being said, it is some of the most delicious butter I've ever had. Give it a go and let us know how it turns out!
      Last edited by yodiewan; 12-23-2012, 07:10 AM.

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      • #4
        Yep, it's important to have enough air in the jar, if churning that way, like a jar a little over half full is good. Let it sit on the counter and get a bit warms first.. doesn't have to be cultured, you can use it fresh or cultured.

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        • #5
          My wife and I bought raw milk once and tried the shake-in-a-jar thing. It was a massive pain in the ass. And we're not so big on butter or milk to justify the effort or expense of making our own as opposed to just buying Kerrygold, so. Just depends on how much you like milk and butter, I guess.

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          • #6
            Just a heads-up for UK readers, the bigger Waitrose supermarkets carry a very nice unpasteurised unsalted French Brittany butter.

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            • #7
              Put raw cream in a food processor. Turn it on and let it go until you have a big glob of yellow stuff surrounded by some watery stuff. Push the yellow stuff into a mold, pushing out as much liquid as possible. That's your butter. The other stuff it buttermilk. You can drink it, culture it, use it to marinate meat, whatever.

              I did it a few times. But a quart of raw cream costs me $13. As I only really use butter in things where it is going to heat up anyways, I'm fine buying OV pasture-butter.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SarahW View Post
                I did it a few times. But a quart of raw cream costs me $13. As I only really use butter in things where it is going to heat up anyways, I'm fine buying OV pasture-butter.
                WOW! I am spoiled rotten. I have been getting raw milk for $3/half gallon. The last half gallon I got seemed like almost half of it was cream. On average though I get at least a cup of cream out of each half gal.

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                • #9
                  Thanks everybody! It sounds like it a pain in the ass.

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                  • #10
                    "I increased in volume and went directly to the butter/buttermilk stage" does you mean you added more milk?


                    Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
                    I did this for the first time a few days ago. For some reason the milk I got last week had a TON of cream on top so I decided to make butter.

                    I let it culture at room temperature for about 18 hours and then tried to churn it. It whipped up slightly, but never separated. So I chilled it in the freezer for a little while and tried again. It never did make whipped cream like I usually get. I increased in volume and went directly to the butter/buttermilk stage.

                    I got maybe a 1/4 cup of butter from about 2 cups of cream. The milk was from Jersey cows. I've heard that different breeds have different size fat globules in their milk, so maybe that plays a role.

                    All that being said, it is some of the most delicious butter I've ever had. Give it a go and let us know how it turns out!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yodiewan - did you seperated the cream after the 18 hours? Thanks

                      Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
                      I did this for the first time a few days ago. For some reason the milk I got last week had a TON of cream on top so I decided to make butter.

                      I let it culture at room temperature for about 18 hours and then tried to churn it. It whipped up slightly, but never separated. So I chilled it in the freezer for a little while and tried again. It never did make whipped cream like I usually get. I increased in volume and went directly to the butter/buttermilk stage.

                      I got maybe a 1/4 cup of butter from about 2 cups of cream. The milk was from Jersey cows. I've heard that different breeds have different size fat globules in their milk, so maybe that plays a role.

                      All that being said, it is some of the most delicious butter I've ever had. Give it a go and let us know how it turns out!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I get raw milk from a mennonite family in PA, they have Jersey cows so there is a lot of cream in the milk. If you have a Kitchen Aid mixer, put the cream in the bowl, and use the paddle attachment. Mix on high (you will have to hold a towel around the top of the bowl in the beginning so you won't have heavy cream flying everywhere). The butter will collect in the center while the buttermilk will separate, just stop the mixer and pour it into a separate container.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jackson44 View Post
                          "I increased in volume and went directly to the butter/buttermilk stage" does you mean you added more milk?
                          Sorry, that was a typo. I meant to say "IT increased in volume". I mean the cream itself increased in volume. Like frothed milk, but it never made whipped cream.

                          Originally posted by jackson44 View Post
                          Yodiewan - did you seperated the cream after the 18 hours? Thanks
                          I should have been more specific. I skimmed the cream off the top of the milk after it had been in the fridge overnight. I let only the cream sit out. I put the milk back in the fridge.

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                          • #14
                            Yodiewan - so after you let it sit out for 18 hours, you skim the cream and then churn it. If it doesn't solidify, you put in back the freeze or fridge? What do you do with the extra cream? Do you readd it? Do you shake it or put the milk in a blender? If you shake it, does it matter if you use a glass jar?

                            Thanks againF!

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