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  • Originally posted by Paleophil View Post
    I see that mung bean starch does contain vitamin A, which is important for night vision.
    This is actually a myth - it was propagated by the British government during WWII to hide the fact that they had developed an advanced radar system that was helping them spot inbound German bombers.

    snopes.com: Carrots and Improved Vision
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________
    Eureka5280: M / 38 / 235lbs / Goal: 180lbs

    Diet: Currently experimenting with higher carb (Peat-esque) primal with emphasis on beef, dairy, seafood, sugar and a bit of starch on lifting days.

    Activities: Started Stronglifts 5x5 on 3/1/14. Adding sprints and hikes soon.
    End of Year Working Set Goals: Squats-250, Bench-200, DL-315

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    • Tatertot,
      What do you think of adding milk kefir back in? I know one of the 7 steps included avoiding dairy.
      Thx!
      K

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      • Originally Posted by Paleophil
        I see that mung bean starch does contain vitamin A, which is important for night vision.

        Originally posted by Eureka5280 View Post
        This is actually a myth - it was propagated by the British government during WWII to hide the fact that they had developed an advanced radar system that was helping them spot inbound German bombers.

        snopes.com: Carrots and Improved Vision
        That article doesn't say that the scientific link between vitamin A and night vision is a myth, just that eating carrots "won't improve vision" (I didn't even mention carrots, and I had read years ago that the story involved bilberries--here's an example of that story: Bilberry Extract for Vision: What the Research Says).

        Here is some research and info supporting the connection between vitamin A and night vision:

        Fundus white spots and acquired night blindne... [Doc Ophthalmol. 2009] - PubMed - NCBI

        Night vision in a case of vitamin A deficiency due to malabsorption.

        Zinc supplementation might potentiate the eff... [Am J Clin Nutr. 2001] - PubMed - NCBI

        Night Vision Problems: Halos, Blurred Vision, and Night Blindness

        Whatever the reason, I had another indicator today of not only improved night vision, but also improved myopia. While wearing the exact same prescription eyeglasses I was able to sit further away from the projector screen in a meeting at work and see better than in the past when I was sitting closer. I can't prove a link, but this change happened after I started taking mung bean starch, so I'm sticking with it for now.

        I also notice less-bad chapping of my lower lip from carby foods since taking mung bean starch. Interestingly, Danny Roddy attributed his own resolution of lip chapping to vitamin A:

        I thought about all the vexing reactions I had to many of the foods Peat recommends for increasing metabolism. Dandruff and chapped lips, both symptoms of vitamin A deficiency (and a lot of other things), were consistently the result of consuming a large amount of orange juice, honey, and dairy.

        Adding vitamin A rich foods (egg yolks, liver) remedied these problems literally overnight.
        Plenty of egg yolks, liver and carrots didn't do the trick for me, but mung bean starch does appear to have helped, whatever the reason.
        Originally posted by tatertot
        Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
        "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

        "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

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        • Originally posted by kmarie View Post
          Tatertot,
          What do you think of adding milk kefir back in? I know one of the 7 steps included avoiding dairy.
          Thx!
          K
          No idea, everybody reacts differently. Give it a try, stop if it's not helping. Milk kefir is good stuff! Mix your potato starch in with it.
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          • What is the difference between raw yams, sweet potatoes, and potatoes in rs percent?

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            • Originally posted by imp View Post
              What is the difference between raw yams, sweet potatoes, and potatoes in rs percent?

              Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
              If you weigh a raw potato (regular white potato), 15-20% of that weight is raw starch. Of that, 75% of it is RS. With me? So if you weighed out 100g of raw potato, it would contain 20g of starch, and about 15g of RS.

              A sweet potato has roughly the same amount of starch, but this starch is only about 5% RS, so 100g of raw sweet potato only yields 1g of RS. Sweet potato starch is more sugar-like than white potato starch, and is useful in the biofuel industry, the same as corn starch.

              Yams are a bit of a mystery. There are so many types and cultivars. True yams are nothing like sweet potatoes or white potatoes. My gut feeling is that they contain quite a bit of RS, but how much, I have no idea. The ones we buy around here in the supermarket may be bred for higher sugar content, but I am just speculating on that. The Hadza people of Africa still dig and eat the same yams that were eaten by our ancient ancestral forefathers. They lay them next to a fire to char and soften them and eat them with the insides still raw and hard, in that manner, I can see them being a great source of RS. I think a lot of times what we think of 'yams' are actually sweet potatoes.

              I know this is probably more than you were wanting to know, but hey, I wasn't so sure, either...

              I found this study on Yam starch which also shows highly variable RS content, I will paste the abstract below, so take from it what you will.

              Bottom line: Potato Starch = approx. 75% RS by weight. Sweet Potato Starch = 5% RS by weight. Yam Starch = 10-20% RS by weight. Hope that helps!

              ABSTRACT: Total starch (TS) and resistant starch (RS) contents in pasty edible product of mealy and hard cooking tubers of three yam varieties and four cassava varieties were determined to evaluate their contribution in their cooking quality. TS and RS contents appeared as the main components in determining yam cooking quality. Mealy cooking yam varieties were characterized by a significant higher TS content (75.2 ± 7.7 g/100 g d.m.) and lower RS content (13.8 ± 3.4 g/100 g d.m.) than hard cooking yam varieties, which, in contrast, contained less TS (61.7 ± 12.1 g/100 g d.m.) and particularly high RS (21.8 ± 9.9 g/100 g d.m.), possibly as a consequence of the prevalence of large granules (35-40 μm) observed by light microscope. Conversely, TS and RS contents appeared not determinant on the cooking quality of cassava. Moreover, higher amylose contents were associated with substantially elevated percentages of RS in yam and cassava, and high RS content in samples modulates their pasting properties by reducing the peak viscosity and the breakdown and requiring higher temperature and longer time to the peak.
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              • Thanks man...that was a lot of good info...in just thinking of making potato chips dehydrated method

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                • I heard lesser yam yields the most resistant starch?

                  Would soaking the potato in water remove the resistant starch?

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                  Last edited by imp; 02-11-2014, 11:05 AM.

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                  • Originally posted by imp View Post
                    I heard lesser yam yields the most resistant starch?

                    Would soaking the potato in water remove the resistant starch?

                    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
                    Soaking in water doesn't remove much starch, you'll see the starch at the bottom of the bowl. Pour the water off and lick it up!

                    Actually potato starch is very easy to make...just shred and pulse the shreds in a blender, then squeeze through cheese cloth (you'll have to add some water to the blender). Squeeze it all into a bowl, let it settle to the bottom. Pour off the water and scrape the wet starch onto a plastic paper plate. Leave the plate on the counter over night and in the morning you'll have a plate with a big chunk of nearly pure potato starch. Crumble this up and use it how you like. It will have a brownish color because you didn't add an antioxidant like they do at the starch factory. You should be easily able to get 4TBS from a pound of potatoes.
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                    • What about RS in soaked, cooked and cooked quinoa, buckwheat or rolled oats?
                      Also, there are a lot of snack foods (way better & food should taste good are 2 brands I've seen) that use sprouted lentils, chia, beans . Would those be a decent source of RS 3?

                      Thx!
                      K

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                      • Originally posted by kmarie View Post
                        What about RS in soaked, cooked and cooked quinoa, buckwheat or rolled oats?
                        Also, there are a lot of snack foods (way better & food should taste good are 2 brands I've seen) that use sprouted lentils, chia, beans . Would those be a decent source of RS 3?

                        Thx!
                        K
                        Sprouted, definitely very little RS.

                        The other things you mentioned all have some, but just a little bit. The RS is not really going to be a major reason to eat them, but it's a bonus if you like them and eat them anyway.

                        Probably the things I would say to eat 'just for' the RS would be:
                        - Green bananas
                        - Dried Plantains
                        - Cooked, cooled, reheated potatoes/rice/beans
                        - Mung Bean Noodles
                        - Raw Potato Starch
                        - Raw banana flour
                        - A slice or two of raw potato

                        I buy a bag of KIND gluten free granola mix and throw a handful in some yogurt and mix potato starch in for dessert a lot. I think the grains you mentioned are all really good to eat, but for reasons besides RS, and they shouldn't be eaten in mass quantities.
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                        • Thanks for your complete response lol...i know soaking removes starch from potato but just curious why it doesn't remove resistant ones much? Confused lol

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                          • Im planning to make potato chips however i needs soaking for 12 hours lol

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                            • Originally posted by imp View Post
                              Im planning to make potato chips however i needs soaking for 12 hours lol

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                              No prob.

                              Anytime you have a chunk of potato, no matter how small or thin, or how long it's been soaked, there is starch in it, and that starch is 75% RS.

                              smallpotato.jpg

                              A picture's worth a thousand words. A potato is basically starch granules held together by thin proteins and water. When you cut a slice off a potato, you'll undoubtedly cut through many of the pockets of starch and spill some out, but the rest are still held in place. In the pic, the big, round objects are starch granules and the green stuff is the plant proteins holding them in place. You can kind of see how the starch granules are in all diff sizes, probably the smallest 25% are the ones that aren't RS.
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                              • So I am i understanding this right?

                                from this DM Dear Mark: Sprints and Blood Sugar, Resistant Starch as Carbs, PUFA in Coconut Oil, Cycling as Chronic Cardio, and Morning Sickness | Mark's Daily Apple

                                about the RS I can baked a sweet potato or black plantain in the oven then let it cool completely, eat it, and not have it count toward my card intake for the day? what about baked and cooled apples or peaches.

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