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Resistant Starches

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  • ARRRGH! By the time I got home and checked Amazon, the Barry Farm plantain flour was GONE! It's not even listed as unavailable, it's just not there at all! *headdesk*

    It is possible to get it direct from Barry Farm here, but shipping is pricy. Shipping to Canada will set you back $20.
    My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
    On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

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    • Ouch. Plantains are typically $1/lb here, I wonder if a dehydrator is the better investment.
      37//6'3"/185

      My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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      • Originally posted by picklepete View Post
        Ouch. Plantains are typically $1/lb here, I wonder if a dehydrator is the better investment.
        That's what I was thinking since I buy fresh plantains all the time. No way I'm paying $20+ to ship a small bag of flour.

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        • Dehydrating plantains and grinding them into flour is very easy. I grind them in a coffee grinder that I use just for grinding spices and nuts.
          Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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          • No need for an electric dehydrator, they dehydrate fine on an airy rack in my fridge. I just have to wait 3-4 days or more. Generally after 3-4 days I stick them in paper bags for storage and further drying. I find that the more they air-dry, the tastier and more easily digestible they become to me. Only problem is, I find it hard to stop eating them and can end up going overboard. As the saying goes, I can't eat just one!
            Originally posted by tatertot
            Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
            "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

            "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

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            • I confess I originally bought PS for making steamed meatballs but this thread coaxed me into experimenting.

              PS + 1/4c coconut milk + canned pumpkin and spices = super thick cake icing thing
              37//6'3"/185

              My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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              • ...I could've missed it in this huge thread, but is anyone re-using their potato water -- ie; the water left-over from boiling taters??

                It's great for soups, sauces, gravies, breads (if you do that), etc...

                I've been drinking cold potato water with 2 TBSP of PS and psylium daily. I would assume that it has to be slightly higher in RS content than just drinking plain old tap water. Well, tastier if nothing else!...hebs

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                • Guys, I just put a pot of rice on to cook, for the first time since going paleo four years ago! Feels weird!
                  My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
                  On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

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                  • Funny, I just bought a box of Uncle Bens Parboiled rice today, it's been two years since I've eaten rice. I sometimes make it for the family but I figured I add it back tonight. Good luck.

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                    • Tater, I only briefly looked at this study http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/vi...20content%2522, but the sense I get from it is that pollens were not being reported as intentionally gathered and consumed as foods, as Richard N. has hinted at here Resistant Starch: Now We and elsewhere, but as things that got onto their foods in minute quantities or remained from plants that were eaten, and which enabled the scientists to determine what time of year they were eating their foods.

                      Scientists use pollens from coprolites and dig-sites in their analyses because they are the best preserved (and least digested) part of plants, rather than because they were a staple food:
                      Pollen grains are generally the best preserved part of a plant, but most of those found in
                      archaeological sites are present through natural causes: they may indicate which species
                      were available, but they tell us nothing of the uses to which they were put. Only where there
                      is a substantial mass of pollen present in an area occupied bv man is it plausible that its
                      presence is not accidental. Thus there is a certain amount of evidence suggesting that plants
                      were used as a form of bedding at Tautavel (France, Lower Palaeolithic), at Franchthi
                      (Greece, Upper Palaeolithic), and the Mas d'Azil (France, Azilian) (see Hansen and
                      Renfrew, 1978: Boone and Renault-Miskovsky, 1976). USE OF PLANTS IN THE EUROPEAN PALAEOLITHIC:
                      A REVIEW OF THE EVIDENCE, http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop.....ding%202-2.pdf
                      Pollens also would require a holding container, such as a sewn animal skin, to gather in quantity, and had more limited seasons than roots and tubers.

                      While Pollens don't strike me as being staple foods, there are some sources that do report pollens being used as supplemental, medicinal or survival foods by traditional societies, such as these:

                      Hidden Dimensions: The Cultural Significance of Wetland Archaeology - Kathryn Bernick - Google Books

                      Pollen as Food and Medicine--a Review
                      http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.230...21103359587363


                      ---------

                      It's interesting that hominy corn grits have the highest listed RS of the corn products http://freetheanimal.com/wp-content/...h-in-Foods.pdf. Hominy corn is akin to the nixtamalized traditional native American corn that hominy gets its name from Hominy: An Original Native American Dish - Yahoo Voices - voices.yahoo.com. It seems that the traditional methods of processing starchy foods often (though not always) produce the highest RS content and every traditional society seems to have had at least one traditional food high in RS (assuming that animal stomach contents contain significant RS). Hominy corn is also reportedly lower in antinutrients than non-nixtamalized corn.

                      I'll bet that modern "instant grits" are much lower in RS than standard grits, as with "quick oats," "instant oatmeal," "instant noodles," "instant potatoes" and "minute rice." These "instant foods" became popular over just the last half century or so. This could help explain the obesity and diabetes epidemics, which became bad just within the same recent rough time period, rather than when grains were first introduced (there were problems then too, such as reduced stature and increased caries, but it doesn't look like obesity and diabetes were nearly as pronounced over the last 10 thousand years as they have been within the last 50+ years).

                      Hominy grits are a traditional breakfast food. I'll speculate that in most societies, high-RS foods were traditionally eaten both at "supper" and as cold leftovers (either raw or cooled overnight and eaten cold or reheated) the next morning for "breakfast."
                      Last edited by Paleophil; 01-19-2014, 11:17 AM.
                      Originally posted by tatertot
                      Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
                      "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

                      "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

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                      • Hey, PaleoPhil - The 'pollen as food' idea came from here: Pollen as Food and here: Medicinal/food Use of Pollen


                        I don't think pollen was important for RS per se, just another example of an ancient prebiotic that was used at one point or another.

                        Pollen is a powerhouse of amino acids, vitamins, and minerals, but it’s poorly digested by mammals. Pollen is more the food of choice of insects and birds, who can digest it well. Why then would early humans choose to collect and eat this poorly digested food? The answer lies in it’s flavonoids.

                        Flavanoids, once called Vitamin P because of the effect they had on the permeability of vascular capillaries, are plant-based micronutrients with powerful actions on:
                        Inflammation
                        Cancer
                        Diabetes
                        Celiac Disease
                        Cardiovascular Disease
                        inhibit coagulation, thrombus formation or platelet aggregation
                        reduce risk of atherosclerosis
                        reduce arterial blood pressure and risk of hypertension
                        reduce oxidative stress and related signaling pathways in blood vessel cells
                        modify vascular inflammatory mechanisms
                        improve endothelial and capillary function
                        modify blood lipid levels
                        regulate carbohydrate and glucose metabolism
                        modify mechanisms of aging

                        Flavonoids have been shown to have (a) direct antibacterial activity, (b) synergistic activity with antibiotics, and (c) the ability to suppress bacterial virulence factors.

                        Well represented in the pollens eaten by hunter-gatherers were the flavonoids luteolin, myricetin, quercetin and tricertin. These flavonoids, quercetin in particular, have recently been proven to have great influence on our good gut bugs! One particular microbe, the probiotic known as Bifidobacterium adolescentis—well-known for it’s anti-inflammatory capabilities—is influenced strongly to greater growth and more powerful anti-inflammatory actions by the flavanols found in pollen.
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                        • Yeah, that's what I meant by a medicinal food. It seems like Richard has been using pollen as a go-to RS-rich ancestral food example in response to critics. For more staple-type ancestral foods that contain RS, I think we need to look elsewhere.

                          The Americas are almost a no-brainer: potatoes, beans, nixtamalized corn, etc. There's tons of info on the RS in these foods, though not everyone accepts the foods of the Americas as "healthy" or "Paleo" (ignoring for now the debate over that).

                          While there's not much info on the RS in African foods, there are lots of tubers and false bananas there, so it's not much of a stretch to guess that there was lots of RS in African foods in the ancient past and I haven't seen anyone deny this. Have you found any info on the RS content of indigenous African foods, especially in the Rift Valley area?

                          RS-rich foods of Eurasia before the introduction of grains and American potatoes seem to be the least-cited and least-understood in Paleo circles (aside from pollens), yet of special interest and relevance to people of Eurasian descent, and I wonder if this is why Richard has been citing pollens so much. My guess is that other foods like perhaps lily corms (ex: sarana http://www.sgr.fi/susa/91/stahlbergsvanberg.pdf), chestnuts, water chestnuts, water caltrops, and legumes would have been bigger sources of RS in pre-agrarian Eurasia (with regional variations) than pollens and thus would be better examples to cite. Have you found anything on this?
                          Originally posted by tatertot
                          Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
                          "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

                          "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Paleophil View Post
                            My guess is that other foods like perhaps lily corms (ex: sarana http://www.sgr.fi/susa/91/stahlbergsvanberg.pdf), chestnuts, water chestnuts, water caltrops, and legumes would have been bigger sources of RS in pre-agrarian Eurasia (with regional variations) than pollens and thus would be better examples to cite. Have you found anything on this?
                            There is just nothing written on this subject. I suspect wild yams, which grew to hundreds of pounds, sago palm pith, cattail roots, and the plethora of tubers, nuts, and seeds provided lots of RS millions of years ago.

                            At any rate, good article on RS today at Precision Nutrition.

                            Makin' RS Sexy! Why didn't I think of that??????

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                            • Originally posted by tatertot View Post
                              There is just nothing written on this subject. I suspect wild yams, which grew to hundreds of pounds, sago palm pith, cattail roots, and the plethora of tubers, nuts, and seeds provided lots of RS millions of years ago.
                              I have seen sago palm reported as containing RS and I confirmed from my notes that African yams also do. Lesser yam was found to contain the most RS among African roots and tubers (CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS AND RESISTANT STARCH CONTENT IN STARCHY FOODS by A Moongngarm - 2013 CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS AND RESISTANT STARCH CONTENT IN STARCHY FOODS &middot Science Publications).

                              African yams are widely regarded as one of H. sapiens sapiens most important early foods, so it's a little strange that I hadn't seen the RS aspect of them mentioned before I started looking into it some months ago. Given that they aren't commonly sold in the USA, there's not much profit motive, but I wonder why it didn't find it in at least some of my science readings either? Even Richard Wrangham, whose cooking hypothesis hinges on African tubers, gave RS short shrift in his book. Yes, profit also drives science, but it seems too crucial a thing to ignore.


                              It was a nice summary article, but that image seems confusing--isn't sticky rice low in RS usually used with sushi?
                              Originally posted by tatertot
                              Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
                              "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

                              "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

                              Comment


                              • Oh, wow. just noticed the rice...
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