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Resistant Starches

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  • There was an interesting podcast from Chris Kresser on resistant starches.

    You Are What Your Bacteria Eat: The Importance of Feeding Your Microbiome – With Jeff Leach

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    • thank you, tatertot!! appreciate the info!

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      • Originally posted by tatertot View Post

        Check back here next week. I did a guest post for Free The Animal that will change everybody's mind on potato starch. Should be up on Monday, i will put link here when it is.
        Can't wait to see this! I keep checking!!
        Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

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        • Originally posted by Muppet View Post
          Can't wait to see this! I keep checking!!
          I'm waiting for it too. I wonder how it will compare to Brent Pottenger's.

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          • Originally posted by Chupo View Post
            I'm waiting for it too. I wonder how it will compare to Brent Pottenger's.
            We have different report formats. but here they are.

            Me:
            Am Gut 1 Tim.jpg

            Am Gut 2 Tim.jpg


            Brent's Results from his website:


            Attached Files
            Last edited by tatertot; 11-26-2013, 12:58 PM.
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            • Tim, let me do an instant analysis of your gut flora. I'll use the gut flora sample among rheumatoid arthritis patients and Healthy Controls recently published. By Healthy Controls (HLT), the study identified healthy volunteers not dxed with RA or any other autoimmune disease.

              Jose U Scher, Dan Littman et al, "Expansion of intestinal Prevotella copri correlates with enhanced susceptibility to arthritis
              with enhanced susceptibility to arthritis," eLife, November 5, 2013.


              Your Bacteroides portion is a whopping 42%, while your paraprovotellae (which I believe is Provotellae/Proteobacteria) is a miniscule 0.1%. Your Bacteroides % is very similar to healthy control's (45%). But here's the kicker: your Provotellae % is out of this world! Provotellae is the inflammatory bacterial strain implicated in inflammatory effects of RA. Even among healthy controls, the Provotellae % is 10-15%! You barely have any!

              Meanwhile, Brent's Bacteroides % is only 16.2% while his Provotellae is 13%. This doesn't seem that bad until you realize that his Bacteroides are significantly lower than Healthy Control's (vs. 45%), while his Provotellae doesn't seem to be too out of line (vs. 12%). But Provotellae becomes a risk factor as they increase their % above 10%. If you look at Graph B, you'll know what I mean.

              Conclusion: Brent's flora is less healthy than your and those of Healthy Controls. His Bacteroides portion is dwindling, although it doesn't seem to be at the expense of Provotellae; his 75 %ile ranking confirms this. If he continues his ways and carves out a higher proportion of Provotellae (say 40%) at the expense of Bacteroides (currently 16%), then his flora will exactly resemble what's called "Newly-Onset Untreated Rheumatoid Arthritis (NORA)." Welcome autoimmunity!

              Why do I get the sneaky feeling that Brent is a hardcore VLCer who doesn't consume any RS or fermentable fiber of any kind? Check out the graphs yourselves

              F1_medium ㅠ b.jpgF2_medium b.gif

              Originally posted by tatertot View Post
              We have different report formats. but here they are.
              Last edited by choppedliver; 11-26-2013, 07:59 PM.

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              • Thank Tatertot-zi and thank you Choppedliver for the analysis!

                Why do I get the sneaky feeling that Brent is a hardcore VLCer who doesn't consume any RS or fermentable fiber of any kind? Check out the graphs yourselves
                Here, Dr. BG described Brent's diet as "near carnivory, fermented full fat Greek + some veggies both raw/cook (per Pottenger's cats). The microbiota sequencing reveals a beautiful display of healthy guts."

                She also described his guts as healthy but perhaps it's relative.
                Last edited by Chupo; 11-26-2013, 08:10 PM.

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                • Would I notice the same effects with gas / wind by upping my RS from the RS3 process ? Or is the gas/ wind with only the rs1 with potato starch?




                  From London England UK

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                  • Originally posted by tatertot View Post
                    Here is the Cliff Notes Version on Resistant Starch. Eat potatoes, rice, greenish bananas, beans, and plantains in your normal daily routine. ALSO eat 1-4TBS of unmodified potato starch, such as this from Bob's, but any brand is fine. It needs to be eaten in uncooked state--straight from bag to mouth. Put it in a smoothy, pudding, yogurt, kefir, milk, or water. If you mix it with a fermented milk product like yogurt or kefir, you will get extra benefits, but it is not mandatory to do so.

                    Start with 1TBS/day for a week or two. Eventually get up to 4TBS a day for a couple weeks if you can, then you can back off to just using it on a frequent basis like a couple TBS a day or every other day, but keep using it.

                    If you get really bad gas in the first couple weeks, back off the dose, but don't let that disuade you fom continuting--it's just gut microbes rebalancing themselves...it can take a month or so. Some people have zero issues, some have mega.

                    Good luck!
                    This is extremely helpful - thanks for posting this! Will pick up potato starch today and add 1 T to my Greek yogurt tonight. (And if I get bad gas tonight during my tae kwon do sparring class, well, maybe that will be an advantage when I spar!)
                    F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

                    **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

                    **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

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                    • Choppedliver - Who are you and why am I just now finding out you are a 'gut whisperer'? That was an amazing analysis--I couldn't have come up with anything close to that. Thanks!

                      What do you make of these: My Bifido is 12% of total gut microbe population. That is like what's in a baby who breastfeeds! Adults generally have 1-3%, the 3% being in people who eat yogurt every day.

                      As probiotic agents, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy in the prevention and treatment of a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gastrointestinal disorders, such as colonic transit disorders, intestinal infections, and colonic adenomas and cancer. The aim of this review is to focus on the gastrointestinal effects of bifidobacteria as probiotic agents in animal models and man. The traditional use of bifidobacteria in fermented dairy products and the GRAS ('Generally Recognised As Safe') status of certain strains attest to their safety. Some strains, especially Bifidobacterium animalis strain DN-173 010 which has long been used in fermented dairy products, show high gastrointestinal survival capacity and exhibit probiotic properties in the colon. Bifidobacteria are able to prevent or alleviate infectious diarrhoea through their effects on the immune system and resistance to colonization by pathogens. There is some experimental evidence that certain bifidobacteria may actually protect the host from carcinogenic activity of intestinal flora. Bifidobacteria may exert protective intestinal actions through various mechanisms, and represent promising advances in the fields of prophylaxis and therapy.
                      Also, one of my 'rare species' is called Slackia, which fits me very well. Slackia produces a chemical called equol.

                      Equol does this stuff:

                      Equol (4',7-isoflavandiol) is an isoflavandiol[1] metabolized from daidzein, a type of isoflavone, by bacterial flora in the intestines.[2] While endogenous estrogenic hormones such as estradiol are steroids, equol is a nonsteroidal estrogen. However, only about 30-50% of people have intestinal bacteria that make equol.[3] Equol may have beneficial effects on the incidence of prostate cancer,[4] bone health [5][6] skin health and physiological changes during menopause,[7] including reducing severity and frequency of hot flashes and stiffness in the neck and shoulder.[8] Other benefits may be realized in treating male pattern baldness, acne, and other problems because it functions as a DHT blocker
                      Last edited by tatertot; 11-27-2013, 10:52 AM.
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                      • Added 1 T of potato starch to about 2/3 C plain Greek yogurt with 1 greenish banana mixed in. Chasing it now with black coffee. Waiting for the health to kick in.
                        F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

                        **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

                        **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

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                        • Originally posted by JackieKessler View Post
                          Added 1 T of potato starch to about 2/3 C plain Greek yogurt with 1 greenish banana mixed in. Chasing it now with black coffee. Waiting for the health to kick in.
                          So how do you know when the health is kicking in? It's not exactly like you wake up feeling like your colonocytes are friskier. I am only being a little tongue in cheek here. Really wondering what the benefits are that we would expect to experience in the near to mid term. Something closer on the horizon than reduced likelihood of rhuematoid arthritis. Thoughts?

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                          • Originally posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
                            So how do you know when the health is kicking in? It's not exactly like you wake up feeling like your colonocytes are friskier. I am only being a little tongue in cheek here. Really wondering what the benefits are that we would expect to experience in the near to mid term. Something closer on the horizon than reduced likelihood of rhuematoid arthritis. Thoughts?
                            Good question! I'm not sure what the benefits will be/what will be experienced short term; looking forward to the answers.
                            F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

                            **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

                            **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
                              So how do you know when the health is kicking in? It's not exactly like you wake up feeling like your colonocytes are friskier. I am only being a little tongue in cheek here. Really wondering what the benefits are that we would expect to experience in the near to mid term. Something closer on the horizon than reduced likelihood of rhuematoid arthritis. Thoughts?
                              I'm going to answer this hesitantly, because I hate to put ideas in people's heads which can sometimes be more powerful than the actual physical changes.

                              'Many people' have reported that almost immediately they are sleeping better and having more vivid dreams. This has some good support in science in that many brain neurotransmitters (serotonin and dopamine) are produced in the gut by the same microbes that produce and eat butyrate. Read more here and here.

                              Another short-term phenomenon is the second-meal effect. But you can't 'feel' it. You can see it if you are tracking BG as diabetics do. Also a lowering of FBG and A1C is seen pretty quickly.

                              Another shorter term, 3-6 weeks, effect is that people who are lactose intolerant find they can tolerate dairy again. YMMV

                              People have reported that long-standing skin problems and allergies have cleared up after a few weeks--another well-supported phenomenon.

                              But, more than likely, the first thing you will notice is changes in gas and bowel movements. When this happens, rest-assured that good things are happening!

                              I always tell people to expect nothing, and see what happens. If you are waiting anxiously, you may be disappointed. I liken supplementing RS with taking my daily K2 and D3 pills. I never notice anything, but I know it's good for me.
                              Find me on Facebook!

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                              • Well, I am having wilder dreams and my slepp is marginally better (meaning still pretty poor). Gas has increased, but not disastrously so. I jumped in with 3-4 T per day in yogurt, thou had been added more taters recently so the flora may have been there and probably just shifted populations around some. I will keep at it on the D3 theory that it is likely to have wide spectrum of benefits. (and put up with a certain amount of spousal eye-rolling, but I have gotten pretty used to that!)

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