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  • Tatertot, how are you preparing your beans? I'm thinking of taking in some cooled bean/rice combo for lunch, and keeping breakfast/dinner protein centered.

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    • Update on RS potatoes. My gut has treated it... meh. I'm only a little bloated, though the IBS is acting up again. Hopefully it will pass soon. I should have done a normal potato meal for comparison, but I think I'll give it a little more time and try with the potato starch when it arrives.

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      • Originally posted by WeldingHank View Post
        Tatertot, how are you preparing your beans? I'm thinking of taking in some cooled bean/rice combo for lunch, and keeping breakfast/dinner protein centered.
        Buy dry beans, soak for 24-36 hours, don't change water. Rinse when ready to cook. Cook by covering with water and boiling hard for about 15 minutes, then simmer 1-2 hours until tender. Maybe better ways, but that works and is easy for me.

        I make a whole bag at a time, freeze in serving sizes, thaw when ready to use.
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        • Tatertot, thanks for the RS cookie recipe. I tried it and found that I felt even better (with a sense of well being and relaxation washing over me) after eating my version of it (which was near-raw and used raw fermented honey for the sweetener) than I did plain potato starch. I narrowed it down to the almond butter (and perhaps there's also a synergistic effect going on here), and so far it only happens with one particular brand - Vermont stone ground raw almond nut butter. I notice that this brand also has a stronger taste of almond essence that I also notice in high quality raw organic almonds.

          I'm guessing that there's a beneficial nutrient in almonds I'm low on that is high in the nut butter. Almonds are high in Mg and I do know that I benefit from Mg supplementation. Maybe I'll learn to make my own almond nut butter.

          The plentiful warnings about the high omega 6 content of almonds had me eating less of them in recent years. I'm no longer overly concerned about the high omega-6 content, as my pyroluria-type medical history (yes, I know the term is controversial, but I haven't found a better term to describe the profile of symptoms and nutritional deficiencies) and my lack of any noticeable benefits from omega-3-rich foods suggests too low omega 6 over 3 ratio, rather than too high, and I would likely only use almond butter as a supplemental food, rather than a staple.

          I think you may have helped me identify another beneficial food for me. Thanks for that.

          Using peanut butter, on the other hand, was a fail. I felt like crap soon after, with stomach ache, throat mucus and flu-like malaise, even though I selected what appears to be the highest quality peanut butter available in my area. This fits with my past experience with peanuts and other legumes, which still appear to be an issue for me even after months of higher RS intake and years of Paleo/Primal eating. I agree with you that legumes were part of the Paleolithic diet (with the consumption of African groundnuts going back at least to Australopithecus anamensis, 4.2 to 3.9 million years ago - http://news.discovery.com/human/huma...diet-nuts.html), but the only legume food I haven't noticed problems from is garbanzo bean flour, which is presumably low in lectins. I had hoped that maybe RS might have helped calm my immune system down enough to tolerate PB, but apparently not.
          Last edited by Paleophil; 11-23-2013, 01:24 PM.
          Originally posted by tatertot
          Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
          "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

          "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

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          • I don't do beans atm but the standard WAP method is "3x3" where you put them in a jar, tie cheesecloth around the top, then empty and replace the water 3 times a day for 3 days or until the sprouts are 1/8" (not more than 1/4"). Not laborious, just planning I guess.
            37//6'3"/185

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            • Did you guys read Guyenet yesterday on beans? But pretty good article on beans.

              Thorough soaking prior to cooking can greatly increase the digestibility of the "musical fruit" by activating the sprouting program and leaching out tannins and indigestible saccharides. I soak all beans and lentils for 12-24 hours.
              Last edited by tatertot; 11-25-2013, 11:23 AM.
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              • I've just cooked a batch of rice , about 175g , cup&1/2.
                It's cooled to room temp , then I put in fridge , what's the best way to get optimum RS, reheat gently back in rice cooker on warm setting or just have it cold with my curry?
                What's also the RS if white rice?
                Thanks


                From London England UK

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                • Originally posted by Ryancarter1986 View Post
                  I've just cooked a batch of rice , about 175g , cup&1/2.
                  It's cooled to room temp , then I put in fridge , what's the best way to get optimum RS, reheat gently back in rice cooker on warm setting or just have it cold with my curry?
                  What's also the RS if white rice?
                  Thanks


                  From London England UK
                  To maximize RS, do as you did, then reheat by stir-frying in a bit of very hot oil. Also, the best rice for RS is Uncle Ben's Converted Rice.

                  Using Uncle Ben's and doing as I described will get you roughly 20-30g RS per cup of cooked rice. A cup of freshly cooked 'regular' rice has about 10-15g, sticky rice has about 1g.

                  I got that info here.


                  Abstract

                  This study aimed to understand effects of different cooking methods, including steamed, pilaf, and traditional stir-fried, on starch hydrolysis rates of rice. Rice grains of 3 varieties, japonica, indica, and waxy, were used for the study. Rice starch was isolated from the grain and characterized. Amylose contents of starches from japonica, indica, and waxy rice were 13.5%, 18.0%, and 0.9%, respectively. The onset gelatinization temperature of indica starch (71.6 °C) was higher than that of the japonica and waxy starch (56.0 and 56.8 °C, respectively). The difference was attributed to longer amylopectin branch chains of the indica starch. Starch hydrolysis rates and resistant starch (RS) contents of the rice varieties differed after they were cooked using different methods. Stir-fried rice displayed the least starch hydrolysis rate followed by pilaf rice and steamed rice for each rice variety. RS contents of freshly steamed japonica, indica, and waxy rice were 0.7%, 6.6%, and 1.3%, respectively; those of rice pilaf were 12.1%, 13.2%, and 3.4%, respectively; and the stir-fried rice displayed the largest RS contents of 15.8%, 16.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. Mechanisms of the large RS contents of the stir-fried rice were studied. With the least starch hydrolysis rate and the largest RS content, stir-fried rice would be a desirable way of preparing rice for food to reduce postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses and to improve colon health of humans.


                  Practical Application

                  After rice was cooked using different methods, including steamed, pilaf, and stir-fried, the stir-fried indica rice displayed the least starch hydrolysis rate and the largest resistant starch (RS) content. These results showed that cold storage of steamed normal rice at 4 °C for 24 h followed by stir-frying with corn oil (10%) reduced the rate of starch hydrolysis and increased the RS content. Ingesting stir-fried rice therefore can reduce the postprandial blood–glucose concentration and insulin response, which benefits the health of diabetics and prediabetics. The large RS content of the stir-fried normal rice could also provide health benefits to the colon.
                  I may be a bit off on exact RS count, the study used 100g of cooked rice--I think 1 cup of cooked rice is very close to 200g.

                  Hope that all makes sense.

                  In other words, to maximize RS, cook, cool, eat cold. Next best method: cook, cool, fry in oil. Next best: cook, cool, reheat with moist heat (pilaf style). Worst way: Cook, eat hot
                  .
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                  • Originally posted by tatertot View Post
                    To maximize RS, do as you did, then reheat by stir-frying in a bit of very hot oil. Also, the best rice for RS is Uncle Ben's Converted Rice.

                    Using Uncle Ben's and doing as I described will get you roughly 20-30g RS per cup of cooked rice. A cup of freshly cooked 'regular' rice has about 10-15g, sticky rice has about 1g.

                    I got that info here.




                    I may be a bit off on exact RS count, the study used 100g of cooked rice--I think 1 cup of cooked rice is very close to 200g.

                    Hope that all makes sense.

                    In other words, to maximize RS, cook, cool, eat cold. Next best method: cook, cool, fry in oil. Next best: cook, cool, reheat with moist heat (pilaf style). Worst way: Cook, eat hot
                    .
                    Thank u


                    From London England UK

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                    • Originally posted by picklepete View Post
                      I don't do beans atm but the standard WAP method is "3x3" where you put them in a jar, tie cheesecloth around the top, then empty and replace the water 3 times a day for 3 days or until the sprouts are 1/8" (not more than 1/4"). Not laborious, just planning I guess.
                      That's how I used to do them, but then I read to leave them in the same water for 24 / 36 hours and leave them until they are visibly fermenting (foam and bubbles!) before rinsing and cooking. And they certainly are much more digestible to me - I was also able to make hummus which tasted like the hummus I've had in Lebanese restaurants for the first time ever!

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                      • a question….

                        i simply don't have the time right now to read all 45 pages of this thread and wondering a couple things.

                        is it ok to eat cooked potatoes that been cooled and then when eating then reheat them? or MUST they be eaten cold to get maximized benefit?

                        powdered 'potato starch'….bob's red mill (i think it that brand, may be hodgsen mills) makes powdered potato starch. would one get the same benefits of eating cooked, cold potatoes by adding this to say a protein shake as as RS source?

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                        • My potato starch has arrived.

                          Will start tomorrow maybe with 1/2 tbsp .
                          Any directions / recommendations tatertot?



                          From London England UK

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                          • Originally posted by dazygyrl View Post
                            a question….

                            i simply don't have the time right now to read all 45 pages of this thread and wondering a couple things.

                            is it ok to eat cooked potatoes that been cooled and then when eating then reheat them? or MUST they be eaten cold to get maximized benefit?

                            powdered 'potato starch'….bob's red mill (i think it that brand, may be hodgsen mills) makes powdered potato starch. would one get the same benefits of eating cooked, cold potatoes by adding this to say a protein shake as as RS source?
                            Originally posted by Ryancarter1986 View Post
                            My potato starch has arrived.

                            Will start tomorrow maybe with 1/2 tbsp .
                            Any directions / recommendations tatertot?



                            From London England UK

                            Here is the Cliff Notes Version on Resistant Starch. Eat potatoes, rice, greenish bananas, beans, and plantains in your normal daily routine. ALSO eat 1-4TBS of unmodified potato starch, such as this from Bob's, but any brand is fine. It needs to be eaten in uncooked state--straight from bag to mouth. Put it in a smoothy, pudding, yogurt, kefir, milk, or water. If you mix it with a fermented milk product like yogurt or kefir, you will get extra benefits, but it is not mandatory to do so.

                            Start with 1TBS/day for a week or two. Eventually get up to 4TBS a day for a couple weeks if you can, then you can back off to just using it on a frequent basis like a couple TBS a day or every other day, but keep using it.

                            If you get really bad gas in the first couple weeks, back off the dose, but don't let that disuade you fom continuting--it's just gut microbes rebalancing themselves...it can take a month or so. Some people have zero issues, some have mega.

                            Good luck!
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                            • thank you!!

                              what about eating warmed up cooked potatoes? do cooked potatoes need to be eaten cold or can they be reheated before eating?

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                              • Originally posted by dazygyrl View Post
                                thank you!!

                                what about eating warmed up cooked potatoes? do cooked potatoes need to be eaten cold or can they be reheated before eating?
                                Just eat potatoes, beans and rice however you like them The amount of RS increase in the different prep methods is not worth worrying about if you are eating potato starch, too. But to answer your question, cooked potatoes can be reheated, don't have to be eaten cold, although eating cold will boost RS by a little bit.

                                It's important to get RS from food and starch, they behave differently and can support different gut microbes, but the real bang for your buck is the raw starch in the 1-4TBS per day range.
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