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Resistant Starches

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  • Read this blog entry today:
    For GI Readers | The HSD

    This blogger has been dealing with constipation her whole life and treating it with GAPS for about 20 months, but still completely dependent on magnesium citrate for motility. She tried supplementing butyrate (specifically magnesium-calcium butyrate) and does not need the magnesium citrate at all. I first read about butyrate by some of the pro-RS folks around here. I am now highly encouraged to try supplementing some resistant starch! Potato starch, here I come. I guess I'll start making yogurt again so I have something to mix it into.
    Depression Lies

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    • Do you do psyllium husk powder or whole?
      Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

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      • Originally posted by Muppet View Post
        Do you do psyllium husk powder or whole?
        I do Psyllium Husk Powder. Have you ever read any of this blog: Animal Pharm? You'd fit right in!
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        • Ok, I am rabbit holeing with psyllium seed versus husk. Mark says do the seed powder.... Is that what you are recommending or the husk powder?
          Gotta love nutrition!
          Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

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          • Originally posted by Muppet View Post
            Ok, I am rabbit holeing with psyllium seed versus husk. Mark says do the seed powder.... Is that what you are recommending or the husk powder?
            Gotta love nutrition!
            I have been under the impression that all 'psyllium' is actually psyllium husk--and it comes ground or whole.

            I found where Mark said this last year:
            Psyllium Fiber

            Psyllium fiber comes two different ways, with each having a different effect on your bowels and their movements. Psyllium husk, which is the popular type of pysllium fiber found in most supplements, comes from the exterior of the psyllium seed and is almost entirely insoluble fiber. It bulks up your poop and can help move things along, but it’s pretty much an inert polysaccharide. Your gut bacteria can’t do much with it, let alone your “own” digestive system. If you need to fill a toilet bowl, psyllium husk will do it.

            Psyllium seed powder, however, is mostly soluble fiber. That means it’s a prebiotic, fermentable fiber that can feed and support your gut flora and spur the creation of beneficial short chain fatty acids like butyrate. In fact, psyllium seed has been shown to increase butyrate production by 42%, an effect that lasted for two months after treatment.

            I’m not a fan of pounding out massive dump after massive dump just because you can. I mean, sure, you don’t want to be stopped up and unable to go when you want to, but there’s nothing inherently good or beneficial about padding your bowel stats and rending your bowel walls with insoluble fiber. Soluble, prebiotic fiber? Via the production of short chain fatty acids, that stuff can actually help reduce colonic inflammation, improve insulin sensitivity, protect against obesity, serve as an energy source for the colon, and possibly even protect against colon cancer. Thus, a case for psyllium seed fiber supplementation can certainly be made.

            Verdict: Cautiously Primal, so long as you’re using the seed powder. But I’d rather you get your fermentable fiber in whole food form. Psyllium husk? Not Primal.

            Read more: Is Psyllium Husk Primal or Paleo? | Mark's Daily Apple
            When I search for supplements I See psyllium seed husk, husk powder or whole seeds. I don't see 'seed powder'. Have you?

            I like the husk powder. It is nearly pure mucilage which has a proven gut health track record. Whole husks are fine, I just think powder is a better value.
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            • I haven't seen any, I have just read about the differences. Can I ask what brand you are using as it seems that most taste like a$$
              Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

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              • And thanks for the website! Love it! I do make my own ferments too of course. I have been primal about three years and about six months ago I did an elimination diet. That diet, along with probiotics, seemed to finally get my house in order. I am no longer on the elimination diet and last night I ate two artichokes without any bloating or gas afterwards (and it was my body reacting badly to artichokes in the first place that made me do the ED). And I am pretty much regular - a first ever in my 42 years!
                Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

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                • Originally posted by Muppet View Post
                  I haven't seen any, I have just read about the differences. Can I ask what brand you are using as it seems that most taste like a$$
                  I use NOW brand Psyllium Husk Fiber. $12/12oz from local store, maybe cheaper online. I use it a couple times a week. Can't say it tastes unlike @SS. Potato starch is tasteless at least, but the PHF isn't totally nasty, just kind of clumpy when mixed with stuff. It's better in a blended smoothy.

                  Originally posted by Muppet View Post
                  And I am pretty much regular - a first ever in my 42 years!
                  That's huge. Hope you keep it that way.
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                  • I am soooo stoked right now! Got my American Gut profile back, I have AMAZING guts! Then, today Chris Kresser did an interview with Jeff Leach, the head American Gut guy, and I got mentioned (indirectly) numerous times.

                    One of the big things that the low carb diets do is they really drop out the resistant starch in the diet. And what’s interesting about a lot of butyrate producers, Roseburia and these guys and Eubacterium, they’re cross-feeders. For example, you have certain species of bacteria, groups of bacteria that break down whatever, cellulose and hemicellulose, and produce acetate and propionate and all these things, but a lot of the butyrate producers are cross-feeders and they’re feeding off of other activities. So, when I see a very low carb person, I often see not only a huge drop in dietary fiber, but a drop in diversity of dietary fiber and a significant drop in resistant starch, which is a huge source of nutrients for the microbiome as well. Resistant starch is often called the third dietary fiber.
                    Richard Nikoley over at Free the Animal has been writing a lot about resistant starch, and a lot of people with blood sugar issues have seen drops of, like, 10 or 15 mg/dL of their fasting blood sugar just from taking 4 tablespoons a day of potato starch, which has, as you know, a lot of resistant starch in it. And in my patients, I’ve seen a similar response and also with people with long-term constipation and gut issues. Of course, it makes sense that resistant starch could play a significant role there. So, I would say at least tentatively now that if anyone is on a ketogenic or very low carb diet, that you might consider some prebiotic fibers or resistant starch just to make sure that you’re feeding your gut bugs what they need to survive.

                    And I think from a resistant starch standpoint, the resistant starch that I think makes the most sense to me is probably lentils. Lentils contain quite a bit of resistant starch as well. This is your area and your expertise, but it can’t hurt by increasing and ingesting those if you don’t have other issues. And again, the other note or the caveat to that, which you’re aware of, Chris, is that you can also cook the prebiotics right out of the onions, too.

                    But I saw a lot of issues with people who were staying with that really extreme early intro approach and started to recommend that people add some more starchy tubers and other starchy types of plants and resistant starch into their diet as they improved in function so that they could preserve their good gut bacteria without completely decimating it.
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                    • Wow awesome tatertot! I still haven't gotten my results back from the America Gut project (but I guess you aren't surprised I did it too!). But my test was pre-PS
                      So do you eat lentils?


                      Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
                      Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

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                      • Originally posted by Muppet View Post
                        Wow awesome tatertot! I still haven't gotten my results back from the America Gut project (but I guess you aren't surprised I did it too!). But my test was pre-PS
                        So do you eat lentils?


                        Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

                        Lots of beans but no lentils to speak of.
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                        • Any reason beans over lentils? I haven't eaten either in awhile but I prefer lentils...


                          Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
                          Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

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                          • Originally posted by Muppet View Post
                            Any reason beans over lentils? I haven't eaten either in awhile but I prefer lentils...


                            Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
                            No reason. I keep meaning to get some. I was off beans for years, just started up again. I have been trying all the different beans, black, white, great northern, pinto, kidney...one day soon I'll pick up some lentils.
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                            • Originally posted by tatertot View Post
                              No reason. I keep meaning to get some. I was off beans for years, just started up again. I have been trying all the different beans, black, white, great northern, pinto, kidney...one day soon I'll pick up some lentils.
                              I would really, really love to add lentils back to my diet. Would that be enough resistant starch without the potatoes?
                              Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                              http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                              • Two questions....

                                Anyone find the potato starch causing joint pain? I get achy if I eat potatoes but hoping the starch alone will be different. I'm achy today but have eaten both.

                                Also, what color should the inside of a green plantain be? I bought one to make chips out of, and the peel is green but the inside is very pale 'papaya' like color.

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