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  • RE: SuperStarch; I read a couple reviews online a while back and the testers said it tasted gritty like Pepto Bismol and they didn't notice any changes to their workouts. You could say the exact same thing about taking 4TBS of potato starch in water--it's a bit gritty and you won't see miraculous gains overnight. I think the magic in RS lies with it's ability to tune up gut microbes and let your body start working the way it's supposed to. Most people will probably 'feel' no different after weeks or months of increasing RS in any form, but I also don't 'feel' my Vit D or Vit K. I think that marketing RS as an exercise enhancer or a fat-burner a sure way to go out of business fast. There was another product, ThermiCarb, that was an RS based supplement for bodybuilders, but it looks like they went out of business.

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    • Originally posted by Paleophil View Post
      Otzi, do you know anything about RS in the Kitavan diet?
      I try to stay out of the Kitivan--Inuit debate. However, I don't see any scenario where the Kitivans would not have been getting lots of RS. The RS of starchy foods increases when they are cooled, I'd bet if you look into it, you'd see they were eating a lot of their food in it's 'cooked and cooled' state.
      Last edited by otzi; 09-22-2013, 09:42 AM.

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      • Also, I think maybe the Inuit were getting a bit of RS, too! People like to think they were eating nothing but whale blubber and seal oil, but in reality, there was all kinds of plant food. From the University of Fairbanks, Alaska on Eskimo food:

        UGNARAT NEQAIT-MOUSE FOOD

        Fall is the season I start picking mouse foods. Most mouse food is found under the soft ground of the tundra. We have to step on the ground to try and find it. Three types of mouse food are: "UTNGUNGSAAT", "MARALLAT", AND "IITAT":
        UUTNGUNGSAATUUTNGUNGSAAT

        We boil "UTNGNUNGSAAT" for awhile until they're soft. We eat them with seal oil. Eating them with seal oil will satisfy your stomach. Besides eating "UTNGUNGSAAT" with seal oil, we also can add tomcod eggs or liver to them. It is very tasty this way.
        MARALLATMARALLAT-YUPIK POTATOES

        "MARALLAT" are Yupik potatoes that are also mouse food. We boil "MARALLAT" until they are soft just like we boil "UTNGUNGSAAT". After boiling them, we pour out the broth of the soup and eat the cooked "MARALLAT" in our bowls. We can eat them with dry fish or other Yupik food too. It tastes very good that way.
        By Josephine Smart

        Interviewed by E. Joe

        IITAT

        "IITAT" is another type of mouse food. They are long and dark in color. "IITAT" are eaten by mice but we also eat them because they are very nutritious. The Yupik people have eaten mouse food since long ago. First, we have to clean "IITAT" very good before cooking them, then we boil them. Then we cut them up and add them to salmon berries for akutaq. We also cook "IITAT" with tomcod livers and with other types of mouse food. We can also add them to seal meat. We start picking mouse food in the tundra in late September. And also in early October. Girls and women pick "IITAT". IITATThey dig them from the tundra and put them in their grass baskets. Only the women work with "IITAT". They boil them and other types of mouse food for lunch and supper. They make a delicious soup.

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        • Indeed, you're the only other primal dieter I've seen mention Eskimo potatoes. Those two words alone should give any ZCer pause.
          Originally posted by tatertot
          Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
          "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

          "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

          Comment


          • Eskimo Potato was definitely used by the Inuit, The Eskimo Potato plant grows in most of Alaska except for southeast and the Aleutian chain. Its habitat is usually rocky slopes and open forests.




            The word troth refers to the plant known in English as "Indian potato", "wild potato", or "wild carrot" (Hedysarum alpinum). The word yeddha' means "its ridge, its hill." Linguistically, it can be analyzed as the word yetth "ridge" plus the possessive suffix -a' (the change from tth to ddh in the possessed form is part of a regular phonological process). Thus the name Troth Yeddha' can be literally translated into English as "Wild Potato Ridge." The apostrophe at the end of the word yeddha' is a meaningful symbol that represents a glottal stop in the Tanana language.
            A description of troth harvesting by the Chena people, very likely in the lowlands south of Troth Yeddha’, was given by Laura Anderson, the last Chena speaker, in her classic woman’s narrative According to Mama (1956:14, reprinted in 2011 by St. Matthews Episcopal Church):

            Sometimes women went poking a long pole in the ground all over. When the ground felt just right there was a mice nest. This nest they dug up and there was a cache of Indian potato roots as big as a big basket sometimes. The women put this in a basket and ate it. The mice got nothing! This Indian potato root people dug, too, and buried it just in dirt. In the middle of winter it had turned just sweet and women peeled off the skin and cooked the white inside root. They would get bear grease boiling and then put the root in.
            The [troth] is good only during the winter, when the natives gather it, digging for it under the snow. It is then round and full, juicy and tender. After the thaw it loses its qualities, becomes hard, woody, and tasteless. It is also used as a substitute for tea or coffee. For this purpose, the root is sliced transversely in segments 1 to 2 inches long; these are divided longitudinally, by separating the fibers, and these are cut again across in small portions, which are afterwards dried and roasted in a frying pan. They are used as tea, in an infusion, and sometimes as a decoction. The beverage thus prepared is said to taste like chocolate.

            Comment


            • That is a good man in that vid, thanks.

              "The mice got nothing!"

              That's not nice! You're supposed to give something to the mice in return.

              Sticks were rare in some areas in the subArctic in winter, so antlers were apparently also used to dig up the tubers and roots:


              "Elder Rachel Riley digging for Eskimo potatoes"

              "The [troth] is good only during the winter, when the natives gather it, digging for it under the snow. It is then round and full, juicy and tender. After the thaw it loses its qualities, becomes hard, woody, and tasteless."

              Yes, This is why living in the same area for generations was so important--so the information about the local plants and animals could be passed on (and so the people could be with the ancestors). So much has been forgotten. For example, I've seen many moderners claim that potatoes are inedible or even poisonous raw and other nonsense, like that rowan berries are also inedible and poisonous. You have to know which foods to eat, when, how, and how much, that's all. Wild potato and rowan berries are not bad foods, they are very healthy foods. My grandfather ate slices of raw potato his whole life and lived into his eighties. Rowan trees were even considered sacred by the ancestors. It's quite sad that sacred foods became thought of as poisonous. The world has turned upside down. It's not noble savagery, it's not wanting to give up good sense for complex modern foolishness.
              Last edited by Paleophil; 09-23-2013, 06:16 PM.
              Originally posted by tatertot
              Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
              "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

              "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Paleophil View Post
                It's quite sad that sacred foods became thought of as poisonous. The world has turned upside down. It's not noble savagery, it's not wanting to give up good sense for complex modern foolishness.
                The Hindus call the current age where things seem all upside down "Kali Yuga". The good news according to them is that this is all a cycle and we will return to a much wiser age eventually

                Comment


                • Interesting. On the bright side, we can use the science on resistant starch and the technology of the Internet to relearn past lessons like apparently the health benefits of traditional RS-rich foods, though the science on this is still young and there is some disagreement.
                  Originally posted by tatertot
                  Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
                  "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

                  "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Paleophil View Post
                    Interesting. On the bright side, we can use the science on resistant starch and the technology of the Internet to relearn past lessons like apparently the health benefits of traditional RS-rich foods, though the science on this is still young and there is some disagreement.
                    A bit off-topic, and I don't want to babble about that but you can read this fascinating article:
                    Myths, Symbols and Mysteries: The end of the Kali Yuga in 2025: Unraveling the mysteries of the Yuga Cycle

                    Basically: descending phase of Kali Yuga = loss of moral and spiritual values but gain in physical and technical sciences. However, this comes with a near complete loss of ancient wisdom.
                    Ascending phase (which according to this guy will slowly unfold starting from now): elevation of moral and spiritual values, re-discovery of lost wisdom, shift in paradigms. The internet and other advanced technologies can actually been seen as catalysts for the coming ascending phase. They will probably be given up eventually as we ascend but being in the bottom of the Kali Yuga, that's the most advanced tools we have to re-ascend again.

                    Of course, I do not know if any of this is true but it is a really amazing way to look at things.

                    Comment


                    • Heh, I am afraid I have the opposite problem with my taste buds - they find absolutely everything tasty, lol. Liver - yum! Sarines - oh, yes! Green bananas - bring it on! etc. About the only things I do not like are dry figs, bitter melons and olive oil/black olives.

                      Of course, I do not know if any of this is true but it is a really amazing way to look at things.
                      New is well-forgotten old....
                      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                      • Great article for those interested: Animal Pharm Blog on RS.

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                        • Does homemade rice milk apply with the same starchy standards?
                          My chocolatey Primal journey

                          Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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                          • Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
                            Does homemade rice milk apply with the same starchy standards?
                            I'd never given it any thought, but I think it would be a really good source of RS. It's made by cooking, then puree'ing the rice and chilling it down. I'm certain that quite a bit of RS would form when it is chilled.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by otzi View Post
                              I'd never given it any thought, but I think it would be a really good source of RS. It's made by cooking, then puree'ing the rice and chilling it down. I'm certain that quite a bit of RS would form when it is chilled.
                              Oh but then, I would try cooled rice pudding!! with whipping cream, vanilla and xylitol Great idea!

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