Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Goitrogens

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    You can read some of Dr.Brownstein's material on the thyroid and iodine. I actually supplement with Iodine because of the lack of it even in an organic whole foods diet, and because of the presence of the other halogens.
    sigpic
    In Pursuit of Healthiness, Only to Achieve Happiness!: www.livingnotsurviving.com

    Comment


    • #17
      I don't worry too much about eating cooked cabbage, steamed broccoli and kale. And I even eat a little kimchee once in awhile;-)
      I don't do flax or flax oil, however. A friend with thyroid issues was doing Johanna Budwig's anticancer protocol where you mix flax oil w/ cottage cheese to sulphur-bind the biophotons (sounds very Star trek, LOL!) and her TSH went through the roof!
      http://www.prettyinprimal.blogspot.com

      Comment


      • #18
        They don't 'destroy' your thyroid. They can bind to the thyroid hormones in your system [in a healthy person], thus lessening your level of thyroid hormones and perhaps lowering your metabolism.

        I have Hashimoto's thyroiditis (7 0f 10 hypo women have this disease), and my endo told me to ignore all these things so long as I'm eating in moderation. It apparently takes massive portions of cabbage, etc. to affect the thyroid. I have my blood checked every 4 months to adjust my meds, and so far there aren't any indicators that vegetables are affecting my hormone levels.

        By the way, a TPO test will not always indicate Hashimoto's because the antibodies may not be attacking when the test is conducted. My Hashimoto's was diagnosed from a biopsy (of a nodule), and my endo commented at the time that he would never have made the diagnosis on my TPO numbers--they were too low. But a biopsy is conclusive.

        However, since the treatment is the same whether or not your hypothyroidism is due to Hashimoto's, it's not a critical issue.

        So far as supplementing with iodine, if I'm being treated by a doctor, I would ask about any supplements. So far as I know, if you're hypothyroid, all the iodine in the world isn't going to improve the situation. Thyroid deficiency caused by lack of iodine hasn't been seen in this country in this century, since the advent of iodized salt and other products.

        Comment


        • #19
          thanks emmie!
          Heather and the hounds - Make a Fast Friend, Adopt a Greyhound!

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by emmie View Post
            They don't 'destroy' your thyroid. They can bind to the thyroid hormones in your system [in a healthy person], thus lessening your level of thyroid hormones and perhaps lowering your metabolism.

            I have Hashimoto's thyroiditis (7 0f 10 hypo women have this disease), and my endo told me to ignore all these things so long as I'm eating in moderation. It apparently takes massive portions of cabbage, etc. to affect the thyroid. I have my blood checked every 4 months to adjust my meds, and so far there aren't any indicators that vegetables are affecting my hormone levels.

            By the way, a TPO test will not always indicate Hashimoto's because the antibodies may not be attacking when the test is conducted. My Hashimoto's was diagnosed from a biopsy (of a nodule), and my endo commented at the time that he would never have made the diagnosis on my TPO numbers--they were too low. But a biopsy is conclusive.

            However, since the treatment is the same whether or not your hypothyroidism is due to Hashimoto's, it's not a critical issue.

            So far as supplementing with iodine, if I'm being treated by a doctor, I would ask about any supplements. So far as I know, if you're hypothyroid, all the iodine in the world isn't going to improve the situation. Thyroid deficiency caused by lack of iodine hasn't been seen in this country in this century, since the advent of iodized salt and other products.
            I agree -- there's so much free talk about thyroid and iodine here, and it scares me. Hashimoto's is an autoimmune disease, in no way caused by lack of iodine (though it may be caused by the SAD!). Moreover, there is evidence to suggest that if you have Hashimoto's, symptoms can be exacerbated by taking supplemental iodine, and medical studies have been done to suggest excess iodine can actually trigger hypothyroidism. I suppose people can find counterarguments to that, but no way would I ever mess about with taking iodine -- even multivitamins have most or all of the RDA, it's very hard to avoid. So as someone who knows I have Hashimoto's, no way would I ever mess around with supplementation unless I was doing so under specific medical guidance. And I think more people should be getting tested and getting proper treatment if necessary, not dosing themselves with iodine willy nilly.

            Comment


            • #21
              I agree that people shouldn't just start on iodine (although I used to think otherwise). Knowing what I know about Hashmoto's being so common and how iodine can speed up the immune system's destruction of the thyroid, it's a bad idea to just take it!!

              I think Emmie misunderstood when I mentioned the thyroid being destroyed. I'm very familiar with Hashimoto's protocols and the fact that it's an autoimmune disease. THe immune system does destroy the gland and the treatment for Hashimoto's is not the same as regular thyroid treatment (and there are 7 different patterns of other types of hypothyroidsim and they each have a specific protocol.) Treating Hashi's with thyroid meds does nothing to address the underlying autoimmune issue.

              I am also familiar with the fact that tests may come back negative depending on when they were taken. Usually gluten provocation is used to get a positive. If someone is being treated for Hashi's with meds, they are most likely not being treated optimally. Optimal Hashi's treatment includes testing the TH-1 and TH-2 pathways (with a panel that includes TNFa, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-4) to find which part of the immune system is dominant and determining if any antigens are present.
              After the pathway is determined, the opposite pathway is stimulated to balance out the immune response and supplements are used to reduce inflammation.
              If this sounds unfamiliar, I highly suggest Datis Kharrazian's book. He is light years ahead in the field of functional endocrinology and treating the root cause of Hashimoto's:-)
              http://www.prettyinprimal.blogspot.com

              Comment


              • #22
                One thing about the iodized salt: I heard iodine is different from iodide. The former is naturally found in sea vegetables and seafood and is supposedly better at preventing goiters... does anyone know if the reduced or the oxidized form are used or absorbed differently?

                Comment

                Working...
                X