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Insuline spike after carbs meal

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  • #46
    Same here. Fat alone has no impact, and how fatty the meat will influence its impact.

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    • #47
      True dat! Nothing like a pound of bacon and a large cup of bulletproof coffee for breakfast to keep this harmful insulin in check…
      "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

      - Schopenhauer

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Artbuc View Post
        A lb of lean chicken breast would send my BG soaring. Just 55 g of beef protein jacked it 24 points.
        Fat slows down insulin response an lowers the glycemic index of foods by slowing the absorption of glucose (whether it's from carbs or gluconeogenesis). Therefore, it seems logical to me that the leaner the meat/protein source, the greater the insulin response and resultant blood glucose.
        "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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        • #49
          Protein: metabolism and effect on bloo... [Diabetes Educ. 1997 Nov-Dec] - PubMed - NCBI

          Insulin is required for carbohydrate, fat, and protein to be metabolized. With respect to carbohydrate from a clinical standpoint, the major determinate of the glycemic response is the total amount of carbohydrate ingested rather than the source of the carbohydrate. This fact is the basic principle of carbohydrate counting for meal planning. Fat has little, if any, effect on blood glucose levels, although a high fat intake does appear to contribute to insulin resistance. Protein has a minimal effect on blood glucose levels with adequate insulin. However, with insulin deficiency, gluconeogenesis proceeds rapidly and contributes to an elevated blood glucose level. With adequate insulin, the blood glucose response in persons with diabetes would be expected to be similar to the blood glucose response in persons without diabetes. The reason why protein does not increase blood glucose levels is unclear. Several possibilities might explain the response: a slow conversion of protein to glucose, less protein being converted to glucose and released than previously thought, glucose from protein being incorporated into hepatic glycogen stores but not increasing the rate of hepatic glucose release, or because the process of gluconeogenesis from protein occurs over a period of hours and glucose can be disposed of if presented for utilization slowly and evenly over a long time period.

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          • #50
            Best explanation yet, with graphs! Low-Carb for You: Protein Intake and Blood Glucose Levels

            What happens when a person eats protein? Insulin is released in response to protein as well, enabling the amino acids to be removed from the blood and stored in the tissue. The cells don't know the insulin is there to remove amino acids from the blood, so they will take up glucose from the blood as well. To prevent hypoglycemia, the liver gradually releases glucose into the blood to replace the glucose that has been stored.

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            • #51
              Fat won't lower blood glucose because if you eat, say 23 grams of carbs alone or 23 grams of carbs and a tablespoon of oil, you still consume the same amount of glucose regardless, that will eventually get processed. It should be slowing the rate of absorption a bit however, which lowers the IMMEDIATE insulin response somewhat.

              It's been said that this can be useful because it eliminates a large, sudden spike which can contribute to insulin resistance if it happens often. This is also why we are encouraged to consume more "whole grains" which have fiber that serves a similar purpose, for whatever that's worth.

              This is also useful because a lack of such a sudden and large spike in blood sugar could potentially contribute to a more stable blood sugar throughout the day.
              "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                It's been said that this can be useful because it eliminates a large, sudden spike which can contribute to insulin resistance if it happens often.
                Prove it.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Timthetaco View Post
                  Prove it.
                  I never said I believed it for myself. It's something that I was told over and over again while I was still absorbed in the CW way of eating.

                  But here: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition - Abstract of article: The effects of fiber enrichment of pasta and fat content on gastric emptying, GLP-1, glucose, and insulin responses to a meal

                  "Conclusions: A dose of 1.7*g psyllium did not evoke measurable effects on gastric emptying, postprandial GLP-1, insulin or glucose metabolism. However the addition of 30*g of oil and 3*g of sodium propionate to the pasta did reduce gastric emptying, increase GLP-1 and reduce glucose and insulin concentrations. While this short-term study may have implications in terms of reducing the risk of diabetes and improving coronary risk factor profiles the long term effects of these nutrients need to be studied."

                  Also: Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract

                  "Addition of fat to either component of the meal reduced postprandial blood glucose (P < 0.05) and insulin responses, but when the fat was incorporated in the soup, peak glucose and insulin responses were delayed as well (P < 0.05)."

                  So... Fat slows and delays the absorption of carbs if these studies are to be believed. It also has the effect of lowering the overall insulin response. Whether this is good, bad, or neutral for the relationship to insulin resistance is not something I can answer, but while I was eating CW-style, I was constantly told that a giant, immediate spike in blood sugar was bad. Of course, primal eating has made me begin to question this.
                  "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                    True dat! Nothing like a pound of bacon and a large cup of bulletproof coffee for breakfast to keep this harmful insulin in checků
                    I'm speaking in terms of the spike in blood sugar....

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