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Glycogen is maintained and replenished during ketosis.

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  • #76
    Owly, I was not recommending any sort of dietary protocol or even, that you should try to be in ketosis. I was simply saying it could be done. If you've found something that works for you, great! Cheers to that.

    What I posted was merely some conjecture based on my current knowledge as to how ketosis for athletes might work.
    "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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    • #77
      A lot of the so-called low-carb athletes are not actually all that low carb if you look at their descriptions of their diets. They may be lower carb than the folks who load up at the pre-race pasta dinner, but they're still eating quite a bit of carbohydrate (look at some of the accounts of their race day fuelling).
      “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

      Owly's Journal

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      • #78
        Originally posted by Timthetaco View Post
        That's the exact opposite of what Peter Attia said happened to him. He said his problem was TOO MUCH protein. How does that reconcile with what you just said?
        Even an athlete can conceivably have too much gluconeogenesis going on to stop ketosis. Simply put, if you don't burn through the glycogen you create (regardless of the source), you won't be in ketosis. Athletes will undoubtedly need more protein than sedentary individuals will, but even for them there is a limit to their need and they can still go over it.
        "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by Owly View Post
          A lot of the so-called low-carb athletes are not actually all that low carb if you look at their descriptions of their diets. They may be lower carb than the folks who load up at the pre-race pasta dinner, but they're still eating quite a bit of carbohydrate (look at some of the accounts of their race day fuelling).
          Right on. But for those who wish to operate in a state of ketosis the carb levels are still low enough that they burn through it all very quickly and get into that ketogenic state regardless. This will be easier to do if you are a very high level athlete, of course.
          "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

          Comment


          • #80
            Low intensity steady state type of activities without any anaerob work, or low rep weight training depending on ATP will not be to different in ketosis. Perhaps some activities may be even better, like shooting, golf or pool etc.! But try some high volume weightraining next time you goes to the gym in ketosis, short breaks, high reps and high sets. That's really sucks...
            "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

            - Schopenhauer

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            • #81
              Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
              Right on. But for those who wish to operate in a state of ketosis the carb levels are still low enough that they burn through it all very quickly and get into that ketogenic state regardless. This will be easier to do if you are a very high level athlete, of course.
              But one of the things that's been noted about ketosis for people like endurance athletes is that it's useful to be able to run on fat as well as carbs during the race, but you don't have much sprint power once the glycogen burns out. That's fine if you just want to get through the race, but if you are competitive and want to be able to put on the jets at the end, you're going to need some carbs because you simply can't generate enough through gluconeogenesis rapidly enough to be able to fuel that burst at the end of the race.
              “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

              Owly's Journal

              Comment


              • #82
                Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                Low intensity steady state type of activities without any anaerob work, or low rep weight training depending on ATP will not be to different in ketosis. Perhaps some activities may be even better, like shooting, golf or pool etc.! But try some high volume weightraining next time you goes to the gym in ketosis, short breaks, high reps and high sets. That's really sucks...
                Even my heavy, low-rep lifting was not good on VLC.
                “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

                Owly's Journal

                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by Owly View Post
                  But one of the things that's been noted about ketosis for people like endurance athletes is that it's useful to be able to run on fat as well as carbs during the race, but you don't have much sprint power once the glycogen burns out. That's fine if you just want to get through the race, but if you are competitive and want to be able to put on the jets at the end, you're going to need some carbs because you simply can't generate enough through gluconeogenesis rapidly enough to be able to fuel that burst at the end of the race.
                  It may effect your results at the end of the race, yes, but consider this...

                  If you can sprint to the front of the pack at the beginning of the race and then have fat burning kick in to fuel you and provide the steady energy you need to maintain your lead, you may not NEED that extra sprint at the end. Again, this is just a hypothesis, and it may not work for everyone who tries it.

                  Experimentation, especially for athletes, will lead them to find which state is the most efficient for them to be in. It will be different for everybody.
                  "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                  Comment

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