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  • #46
    Is there a resource that grades the tap water in specific cities? Anyone know how the water is in Newark, NJ? Is there any point in using a filter? I've read that grocery store filters add more to the water than they take away.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Damiana View Post
      Well, for most of history, drinking water was unsafe. There were too many contaminants in drinking water (think London before 20th century) and people got truly horrible water-borne illnesses from drinking just water alone.
      Not to mention the drinking pits/rivers were usually occupied by larger animals.
      I don't think Grok drank that much.
      Everything is bad for something - How do you feel today?

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      • #48
        Drinking water is very important to our human body because it is very good for health and the person make perfect and fresh who drinking water more and more, i also used drinking water more and more and my health is very good and perfect i always sharp.
        I always sharp, too, my spammy friend.

        And let's not forget coffee. The myths are untrue. It is effective to hydrate with coffee, providing it's free of mycotoxins.
        Crohn's, doing SCD

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Zanna View Post
          Damiana is right - Beer was the primary drink -watered down - but that's what everyone drank because it was safe. Water was sketchy.
          Primarily because you had to boil the water to make the beer which sterilized the water but they didn't make the connection. The Chinese discovered tea to be safer than water for the same reason, but didn't make the connection for years.
          "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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          • #50
            Originally posted by dizzyorange View Post
            Is there a resource that grades the tap water in specific cities? Anyone know how the water is in Newark, NJ? Is there any point in using a filter? I've read that grocery store filters add more to the water than they take away.
            How Clean is City Water? View EWG's Big City Water Ratings | Environmental Working Group
            F 28/5'4/100 lbs

            "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
              Primarily because you had to boil the water to make the beer which sterilized the water but they didn't make the connection. The Chinese discovered tea to be safer than water for the same reason, but didn't make the connection for years.
              Actually, no. If that was correct then wine (which is not boiled during production) wouldn't be another of the safe-to-drink liquids of yore.

              Beer is a cultured food product, like yogurt or pickles. It is made by creating a liquid that is ideal for the growth of microorganisms - lots of available sugar for example - and then inoculating that liquid with microorganisms and letting them go to work. I say inoculate but one traditional way of doing that is putting the liquid in large flat (high surface area) containers in an attic and leaving the windows open. It is safe to drink for two reasons: 1) the pre-fermentation environment is better suited to benign microorganisms than to harmful ones, so the odds of a dangerous culture developing are low, and 2) microorganisms tend to change their environments to interfere with the growth of other microorganisms, so the growth of yeast makes the environment (the wort/unfinished beer) difficult for bacteria to live in etc.

              Beer isn't even boiled, necessarily. The wort is raised to temperatures which activate enzymes in grain, converting starch to sugar which is then leached out. Boiling is not really desirable as it is above the enzyme activation temperatures. Brewers centuries ago learned to watch how the water behaved and try to hold it at a pre-boil because they couldn't directly measure the temperature.

              Last edited by Him; 12-06-2012, 05:36 AM.

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