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Where did Paleolithic man get his calcium from?

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  • Where did Paleolithic man get his calcium from?

    I'm having a hard time understanding where Paleolithic man got his calcium from. The only regular source of calcium for people today is in dairy, and since for the majority of our evolution we didn't have dairy it doesn't really make sense. I have read that Calcium isn't actually that important for bone health and it's actually vitamin D which is the key component. It seems like a lot of the "Calcium Importance" awareness is funded by the dairy and cereal industry. All you ever see on food advertisements these days are "a good source of calcium" or "fortified with calcium" etc etc. It seems that it would be very hard to get anywhere near the supposed RDA of calcium without dairy or fortified foods. Any thoughts on if calcium is that important, and if so where did Paleolithic man get his from?

  • #2
    The calcium in vegetables is more bioavailable than the calcium from most dairy products. Primitive man would have eaten more of the animal than we eat today and more types of animals than we eat today. They would eat the bones of fish and possibly even small mammals, gnawing on the bones of larger ones. Even the meat has some calcium in it.

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    • #3
      One source of calcium that the prehistoric men enjoyed but we do not are various insects & mollusks in shells. Overall though the dosage of calcium required for health is vastly exaggerated according to Mark.
      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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      • #4
        If anything calcium seems to be the culprit of blocked arteries more than fat/cholesterol...



        AC

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        • #5
          In addition, early man moved around a lot and so their bone density was probably in better shape than modern (sedentary) man's is. Maybe they didn't require as much?
          "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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          • #6
            Originally posted by AlanC View Post
            If anything calcium seems to be the culprit of blocked arteries more than fat/cholesterol...



            AC
            Please reiterate on this?

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            • #7
              I know deer often nibble on old antlers as a source of calcium. So if early man scraped/ate all the meat off the bone they would get some that way.
              I wonder if the bone marrow in animals contains notifiable calcium ant that could be a source
              Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by AlanC View Post
                If anything calcium seems to be the culprit of blocked arteries more than fat/cholesterol...



                AC
                This is not because of excess dietary calcium, it is how you body uses calcium based on other factors.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zach View Post
                  This is not because of excess dietary calcium, it is how you body uses calcium based on other factors.
                  Can you say more about this please?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lukey View Post
                    Can you say more about this please?
                    Calcium and Disease: Hypertension, organ calcification, & shock, vs. respiratory energy (wfs)

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                    • #11
                      What is your take on it then? do you recommend a high or low calcium intake?

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                      • #12
                        Just pulled up a few lists on Google, here are some options:

                        Sardines contain 325 mg of calcium per 3 ounces.
                        Pink salmon offers 181 mg of calcium per three ounces.
                        A half cup of collard greens has 178 mg of calcium.
                        One tablespoon of blackstrap molasses offers 172 mg of calcium.
                        Other types of greens, nuts, okra show up as being calcium rich food sources.
                        Coming soon - get your own online primal journal!
                        http://journal.primalapp.com

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                        • #13
                          I get a lot of calcium from fish bones. Bone broth is another option. Also, vegetables have a lot of calcium. Dairy is actually a poor source of calcium.
                          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lukey View Post
                            ... It seems that it would be very hard to get anywhere near the supposed RDA of calcium without dairy or fortified foods. Any thoughts on if calcium is that important, and if so where did Paleolithic man get his from?
                            If you look at it like early man originated near the oceans, it's easy to see where he got his calcium. Fish, esp little bony fish, seaweed, bird eggs, shellfish, etc... But where did he get it when he moved inland? Like the North American Indians of the plains?

                            I was in a quandry over this as well, and also wondered about iodine. Any animal with bones needs calcium and any animal with a thyroid needs iodine...so that pretty much is every living animal.

                            If you raise horses, you need to supplement their food with 10mg of iodine and and 20g of calcium. The rda for humans is 150mcg iodine and 1g calcium. So where in the hell do wild horses get that much iodine and calcium?

                            Turns out, that in the wild, they get all of both from drinking water that standing on the earth (mud puddles) and also from eating the dirt clinging to plant roots they are eating. So, when I see all those wild critters around the world who seem to be doing just fine with the minerals they need to survive, I worry a little bit less.

                            I think what we really need to worry about is the RDA's we use. I think it seems to be built around the nutrition you get from eating a grain-based diet.

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                            • #15
                              The foods and vegetables you see available to you in the supermarket are literally 1/100th of what was available in the wild 20,000 years ago. Even some wild nuts today in the Australian bush contain even more calcium than dairy products. Insects are high in calcium too.

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