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  • Camping menu suggestions

    Hi, this may sound idiotic considering the premise of our diet, but I was wondering if anyone has primal ideas for camping (no hunting or fishing involved, unfortunately)

    I do just fine in the kitchen, burgers with no buns are fine on a plate but in the woods? I am wondering what can i do for 'hand food' while camping as this will be our first camping trip sans bread. Also, any creative ideas for snacks? I am obviously skipping the 10 bags of chips, however I worry that nuts and seeds wont satisfy the cravings of 'some' (insert not-fully-commited-to-primal boyfriend's name here)

    Thanks!
    Loving my primal life

  • #2
    If you're just going out for a night or two, some frozen steaks in a cooler of ice hold up well. Thin sliced, thaw before cooking kabob style over the fire. You could even just pre-cook and keep it in the cooler, heat up on the fire before eating? Fresh fruits. Nuts. If you have the cooler, some cheese and hard boiled eggs travel well. And a good nugget of dark chocolate in your pack
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    • #3
      Pre-make some foil packs. Fold foil into pouches (maybe 2 layers, to be safer) and fill up with seriously ANY combination of meat, veggies, and spices (and butter!). Stick them in the edge of the fire, wait til you hear them hissing/bubbling for a few minutes, then pull them off and eat 'em. It's really hard to screw up, and FANTASTIC when you get a good batch.

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      • #4
        How about meats that are easy to hold/eat without a plate like chicken legs/thighs/wings or ribs. Chicken legs are good for snacking if pre-cooked and kept cool.
        I just made some fudge babies which would be easy to transport and pop into hungry mouths. Fudge Babies

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        • #5
          Campfire?
          Big stove or one of the little hiking/single burner deals?

          I haven't been camping since getting interested in this whole "primal" deal, but here are some of my favorites that seem compatible (correct me if wrong)...

          Dutch oven frittata is good. Can be made with just about anything so long as you have eggs (which keep surprisingly well).

          Foil and stick cooking have been mentioned.

          Beyond the obvious jerkey and dried sausages, the drier styles of smoked salmon (fish in general) is wonderful for snacking on if you can afford it, and will keep fine for a camping trip. Maybe not the best thing to have in your pocket in bear country though.

          Hard boiled eggs keep surprisingly well too, even without a cooler.

          Apples and the like, of course.

          Olives are great for snacking and adding flavor to other foods.

          Pickles (not just cucumber), sauerkraut, tsukemono, etc have worked well for me.

          I could go on (I love camping)....

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          • #6
            Ah! those are great ideas. and I am totally going to try to make fudge babies, seems easy enough!
            Loving my primal life

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            • #7
              Another which I haven't personally tried but have thought of is Pemmican. Seems like it should be high on the primal index despite the dried fruit. Pemmican Recipes

              There is also stuff like this "Coconut Crack Bar" recipe:

              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread72052.html ... looks very sweet to me but it looks like prime camp food for short hikes and the like.

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              • #8
                Pork kebabs = crack. Buy some pork shoulder, cut into 1" cubes, then marinate with the juice of one lemon, salt, pepper, and onion for about 30 minutes.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
                  Pre-make some foil packs. Fold foil into pouches (maybe 2 layers, to be safer) and fill up with seriously ANY combination of meat, veggies, and spices (and butter!). Stick them in the edge of the fire, wait til you hear them hissing/bubbling for a few minutes, then pull them off and eat 'em. It's really hard to screw up, and FANTASTIC when you get a good batch.
                  I remember these from my Girl Scout days. We called them Turtles. Honestly, it's the only thing I remember about that trip, they were that good.


                  Another good traveling food is salami or any hard sausage. Just peel the paper as you go and it'll last a really long time, even with no refrigeration.

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                  • #10
                    I second the suggestion of eggs, they really don't need to be refrigerated unless it's super hot outside. Same with hard cheeses. Tuna pouches are great for snacks/quick lunches. Any sort of meat you can grill, you can cook over a fire. Foil pouches are great for veggies. We lived in our travel trailer at state parks for 9 months and even though I had a kitchen in the camper, I've cooked everything from bratwurst to spaghetti squash over a campfire/grill. One of my fave day hike picnic lunches was tuna, turkey, cucumber slices, cheese, baby carrots, olives, and mini-Larabars.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by polos26 View Post
                      I was wondering if anyone has primal ideas for camping
                      You don't say whether you are going lightweight and moving or are static. When static I take a frying pan and have omelettes for breakfasts, usually mushroom or spinach. When on the hill, I will take water, a flask of black coffee and roast chicken thighs plus hard boiled eggs for lunch. I also carry emergency rations of nuts and boil in the bag meaty food. Back at camp I'll BBQ meat, peppers, mushrooms & more and maybe have some salad too.

                      Backpacking & camping out, I'll take more nuts, dried fruit & etc and cook less. Where I go there is always water available (I use a pump up purifier) so I carry dried food that I can just add boiling water to. It's bit more difficult to find primal type bags but I am not a fussy eater and can have the same dish for several days on the trot. Days 1 & 2 at least, I can still have my chicken thighs and hardboiled eggs for lunch. Another idea, in the right countryside, is to take dried meats and cook it up with plants found en route for the evening meal. I have a plastic egg carrier to keep fresh ones safe for a day or three.
                      Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

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                      • #12
                        If you have time to read sbhikes journal, she has some good camping meals, although she leans more toward backpacking-camping, than campground-camping. Not sure which kind you will be doing.

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                        • #13
                          Are you backpacking or car camping? If you are car camping, bring plates and bowls. If you are backpacking, make one-pot meals. Here's my menu from my latest backpack trip (last weekend). Note that this took a lot of effort in advance to make the pemmican, dried veggies and dried chicken.

                          Breakfast
                          Homemade pemmican (dried beef pulverized in blender and mixed with melted grass-fed beef tallow and dried cherries)
                          Cowboy coffee

                          Lunch
                          Home dehydrated veggies that I soaked in water in a peanut butter jar as I hiked.
                          One pemmican puck (either homemade beef pemmican without cherries or coconut pemmican which is made of coconut and melted beef tallow)
                          Home dehydrated chicken went with the meals that had coconut pemmican
                          Melted the pemmican puck into the re-hydrated veggies on my stove.

                          Dinner
                          Same as lunch

                          Dessert
                          A date/almond butter, coconut, dried banana bar I made
                          Hot toddies (burbon, true lemon, cinnamon and honey from my friend who is a bee keeper.)

                          My stove: Caldera Cone System | Trail Designs
                          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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