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Ketogenic Athlete Study

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  • #46
    Someone pointed out above that the athletes' food intake was self-reported, which makes the data extremely unreliable.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

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    • #47
      So, you would think that all the athletes participating in a study, focusing on food intake had a real crappy food recording skill, while an average Joe and Jane does so much better & that explains the discrepancy in the results, not the flawed calculations?

      My feeling is that we a) don't burn nearly as much as the calculators say and b) don't need as much food as the calculators say.

      or human beings are incapable of recording food and the whole comparisons are then completely pointless?
      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Leida View Post
        So, you would think that all the athletes participating in a study, focusing on food intake had a real crappy food recording skill, while an average Joe and Jane does so much better & that explains the discrepancy in the results, not the flawed calculations?

        My feeling is that we a) don't burn nearly as much as the calculators say and b) don't need as much food as the calculators say.

        or human beings are incapable of recording food and the whole comparisons are then completely pointless?
        Self-reporting is notoriously unreliable in any study of food intake. People tend to underreport and report eating more "healthy" choices when they know someone is going to look at their food log (and often the reporting is based on recall rather than meticulous tracking, which is even more unreliable). I doubt athletes are particularly better at this than other people on average.

        I think calculators tend to overestimate the impact of exercise on caloric needs, and there's good research that bears this out. Exercise isn't a good way to lose weight. It's a good way to shift body composition, but it doesn't do a lot to make people thinner on average.

        I also think calculators are bad at measuring an individual's BMR because there's a lot of variation from person to person. Someone who's lost a lot of weight, for example, may need to eat significantly less food to maintain their weight than a person who is that same weight and has never been much fatter. A person with a metabolic condition might need to eat more or less than another person the same size with a normal metabolism. The calculator is an approximation based on a formula and may or may not be accurate for a given person.

        But the fact that YOU cannot get to 15% body fat without severe restriction does not mean that the Average Jane with a healthy metabolism needs to severely restrict calories or become fat--she might not get as lean as you're trying to be, but she can sustain a healthy body weight without having to starve herself.
        “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

        Owly's Journal

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        • #49
          I was specifically talking about the 'last 10 lbs' group that seem to be a recipient of the "eat more because you exercise so much!" advice.

          For the record, I right now I would be happy just to stop gaining the f'ing weight, 15% be doomed.
          My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
          When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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          • #50
            I don't necessarily think the calculators are wrong, but that people are using the wrong multiplier for their activity level. Just like folks tend to underestimate calories, they probably overestimate their daily activity, thinking they do more than they actually do.

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            • #51
              And I also agree, getting BMR from using BMI is faulty. It would seem the only true way of accurately getting a BMI is from a DEXA scan, or from hydrostatic weighing, but really who is going to shell out the money to do that? So basically it's like anything else, you use BMI to get an "average" of what you should be consuming and from there you may have to tinker around to find the best macros and caloric intake to get the results that you want.

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              • #52
                I noticed that my lifting suffers while I am in ketosis. Probably because I don't have the glycogen reserves in my muscles.
                Fitness Wayne | Paleo Health, Exercise and Weight Loss Blog
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