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Women IFers -- lets chat about protocols!

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  • I thought the whole point of IF is to keep calories lower than you normally would eat, because you skip one meal.
    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
    When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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    • No, the point of IF is to eat within a certain window, while eating the normal number of calories that you owuld eat spread across a day during that window.

      The fasting itself -- the duration of it -- is what has benefits to the cells and body, but our bodies still need the calories that they need, whether we are eating them all in one meal (warrior diet style) or in three meals in a 5 hr window, or three meals and two snacks in an 8 hr window, etc.

      What most people discover is that they adapt and eat fewer calories (in my case, it dropped from 1600-1800 to 1500-1700 -- so a 100 calorie change), but I didn't do any specific caloric restriction. Also, there are some days where I will have 2000 calories (or more) during my normal feeding window. No big deal. I don't restrict calories the next day, I just eat during the feeding window as hungry.
      Last edited by zoebird; 12-04-2012, 04:16 PM.

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      • Originally posted by Leida View Post
        I thought the whole point of IF is to keep calories lower than you normally would eat, because you skip one meal.
        Leida, the point of fasting (at least shorter intermittent fasts) is to give your body a chance to burn through the food it is eating. If you are constantly injecting calories into your body, even at a low level, your body says "great, I'll just use this food for energy."

        But now imagine, eat a day's worth of calories in one sitting. You aren't hungry at all anymore. Throughout the period of the fast, your body then dips into the stores of fat on your body to provide energy. You lean out on a fast, but hopefully, don't lose too much weight.

        As was said, calculate your BMR and eat at LEAST that much and the fasting will be easier.
        "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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        • My BMR is 1230-1300 calories depending on my exact weight on the day, so I don't dip below it. As for eating a day's calories in one sitting and then not being hungry at all during the day, heh, doesn't happen. I can eat huge amount of calories in one day and then still hungry the next day. After my overfeeding day when I take in excess of 2,500 calories (exceeding my maintenance of 1,600 calories), I am still hungry by 8 am next day 4 hours after waking. I think my hunger corresponds with time after waking rather than with time after last meal & the size of it.

          All IF protocols I have read about said the point was to reduce hunger and caloric intake by concentrating the feed. It just doesn't happen to me. Like yesterday, I did not eat breakfast, and ended up with more calories, like 1,750 &, of course, regained good 0.7 lbs (Sigh) now I am heavier than last week at the same time, so I doubt I will lose weight this week.

          Keeping fingers crossed I can skip supper tonight. I have X-mas lunch at work, then the dentist and then I will take myself to Zumba/pool. Hopefully i will be home after my folks had had supper...
          Last edited by Leida; 12-05-2012, 06:32 AM.
          My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
          When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

          Comment


          • I'm finding it much easier to IF right after my period. For about 2 weeks, (I guess that's pre-ovulation) my appetite is very much under control and I can do perfectly well with a cup of coffee in the morning and dinner (about 1200-1300 calories) sometime before 7.
            Over the next 2 weeks or so I'm hungrier and usually have to have 2 meals. Still I try to stay within 1500 - 600 calories, but I'm no stranger to overeating at least on a few occasions during pms
            What I'm finding rather curious is that on Primal I'm pretty much the same weight and body composition regardless of macros and calories. I've tried low-carb, even VLC, high-er as in over 100g daily, given it time to see how my body responds.....still I'm the same weight.
            That's okay I guess, since I'm kindof happy with my current weight, but I'd still like to lose a bit more fat. Mostly on my thighs...sigh

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            • I find it easier to work on one thing at a time. When I decided to try IF, I worked on lengthening the hours between meals, with less concern on the quantity of food (but still primal). I just ate till I feel satiated. Once I've adjusted to that (took a week or so?), i.e. stop craving food or feeling hunger or thinking about food between meals, I'm now working on tweaking what I'm consuming. If I don't eat enough, I binge in the next meal, and end up feeling very imbalanced. Tea only helps when not truly hungry.

              The interesting thing is, once I've gotten used to eating in a shorter window, it's much easier to be aware of real hunger and to stop eating when full. I think prior to this, I eat out of habit not out of hunger.

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              • Got a question for you... I have been fasting a couple days a week from dinner to dinner, about 20 hrs. I log all calories so I know what I am consuming (eat primal for weight loss and health reasons). I have had some friends that have had a lot of success with an alternate day diet where the low day is less than 500 cal. Yesterday I broke my fast with a 750 cal dinner. Have you seen any differences in weight/fat loss dependent on what you ate after your fast?

                I typically see at least a pound drop on the scale after my fast day. Yesterday was a little less but I am chalking that up to inflammation from sore muscles post strength training.. So far fasting seems to be the only way I can drop fat. But I don't want to negate the benefits by eating too much when I break my fast..

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                • Originally posted by AmyP View Post
                  Got a question for you... I have been fasting a couple days a week from dinner to dinner, about 20 hrs. I log all calories so I know what I am consuming (eat primal for weight loss and health reasons). I have had some friends that have had a lot of success with an alternate day diet where the low day is less than 500 cal. Yesterday I broke my fast with a 750 cal dinner. Have you seen any differences in weight/fat loss dependent on what you ate after your fast?

                  I typically see at least a pound drop on the scale after my fast day. Yesterday was a little less but I am chalking that up to inflammation from sore muscles post strength training.. So far fasting seems to be the only way I can drop fat. But I don't want to negate the benefits by eating too much when I break my fast..
                  Yes. Fasting has your body in ketosis. So if you eat ketogenic foods to break the fast and stay with them, you don't get the "rebound" weight gain. I broke my four day fast with a big steak with butter on top.

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                  • The main problem with IF is it does lower pulse.

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                    • Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                      Leida, the point of fasting (at least shorter intermittent fasts) is to give your body a chance to burn through the food it is eating. If you are constantly injecting calories into your body, even at a low level, your body says "great, I'll just use this food for energy."
                      Whether you eat once, twice, or five times a day, your body will still burn through the food it's eating, assuming calories are consistent. Regardless of meal frequency, the food still has to be digested. Either you consume smaller, more frequent meals and the energy is used immediately, or one big meal, and most of it goes into fat storage, then hopefully used as needed later in the day. Am I missing something?

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                      • I don't know, but I think I am going to pass on the IF. I am a hopeless grazer. At least right now. Maybe it will change.
                        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                        When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
                          Whether you eat once, twice, or five times a day, your body will still burn through the food it's eating, assuming calories are consistent. Regardless of meal frequency, the food still has to be digested. Either you consume smaller, more frequent meals and the energy is used immediately, or one big meal, and most of it goes into fat storage, then hopefully used as needed later in the day. Am I missing something?
                          Eating 5 times a day makes me think and crave food all the time. I couldn't get through the day without snacking. Some days I find myself grazing all day. I find myself less alert after meals.

                          Eating twice a day makes me forget about food until it's time next meal, and my mind is clearer. Even that irritability that I used to get when hungry has disappeared. I assume this difference is related to insulin production after meals? I.e. constantly producing insulin in response to eating vs producing insulin twice a day?

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                          • There are lots of ways of fasting, that's why I titled it "protocols."

                            Personally, ADF doesn't work well for me, but having a 14-16 hr fast daily works really well. It's comfortable, and gives me the desired benefits.

                            BestBetter: go and research the science for yourself, then decide what you think of it.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                              There are lots of ways of fasting, that's why I titled it "protocols."

                              Personally, ADF doesn't work well for me, but having a 14-16 hr fast daily works really well. It's comfortable, and gives me the desired benefits.

                              BestBetter: go and research the science for yourself, then decide what you think of it.
                              Actually, I've researched IF ad nauseum...between reading all those articles and trying it for myself, I think it's generally a waste of time to do purposefully. Which doesn't mean people shouldn't do it if they want to, or it makes them feel good, I just never experienced any of the so-called benefits myself.

                              Comment


                              • BestBetter,

                                I get what you are saying. I agree with you. If it doesn't work for you -- or you don't see/feel/experience any benefits, I agree that there's no reason to bother.

                                For me, it's the unseen benefits that I'm banking on. The research that I've read demonstrates that ADF and 14/10 or 16/8 IFing greatly reduces various markers of aging/disease (according to that Horizon show and then the research I looked up afterwards).

                                At this point, the blood work that I want (which you can get at the Crossfit Box in San Fran that Mobility WOD is attached to) isn't available in NZ. If it were, we'd be able to see all kinds of biomarkers for health, longevity, etc. We will be getting some basic bloodwork in the coming weeks (immigration), but otherwise, I am simply banking on the "unseen" benefits.

                                Unlike my husband, who never did fasted workouts before, I haven't really "seen" any benefits per se -- though I have felt some overall. So, it's worth doing to me.

                                But I'm not fussed about anyone else doing it or not doing it.

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