Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Absorbing Protein

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Dr. Bork Bork View Post
    Just wanted to reach out to the diabetic poster here. I'm T1.5 (also on insulin pump, but only for pregnancy). I haven't had the protein spiking problem, but I usually don't have more than 50g in a sitting. It's usually in the form of a morning protein shake with at least 1/2c of heavy cream. Have you been having fat with your protein? Fat helps slow down the spiking process.
    Thanks for your reply!

    I usually don't eat that much protein in that time frame unless I'm just craving it and that happens about once every 2 weeks or so. The main source of protein that I had that night was chicken but I also had goat cheese, a couple of eggs and coconut butter.

    Comment


    • #17
      I've heard not to exceed 50g in a meal, but that might just be CW bunk.
      --Trish (Bork)
      TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
      http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
      FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by drnemer View Post
        So does anyone know how much protein can one take per meal? Is there really a limit? Now I just wonder if I go over the threshold that the protein might not be utilized
        Check out the link that otzi posted on this thread. I think it will answer your question

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by drnemer View Post
          Nice blog. I added it to my bookmarks. So from what I understand glucagon from the protein I eat is benefiting my burning of fat and building of muscle? It won't raise my insulin.

          Is some of the protein going to waste because I had a large intake in one time?
          The way this works is that you need to raise insulin in order to assimilate nutrients, so insulin is the storage hormone. No insulin, no storage, and you quickly die. This is why the development of artificial insulin was such a momentous event in medical history. Of course, part of storage involves adipose tissue, so you may add to fat mass, albeit very temporarily.

          Glucagon works opposite to insulin, it is the signal to the body to release stored nutrients. Release of nutrients generally involves the liver and adipose fat. Of course, you cannot release that which you did not store.

          So, effectively eating a meal consists of storage (insulin) and release (glucagon) of nutrients. To focus only on the insulin stimulating effects of protein is to literally miss half the picture, but this happens in the majority of discussions relating to insulinogenic effects of various foods. The net result of this is that people get terrified of insulin, when insulin is a critical life promoting hormone.

          With regards to wasting of excess protein, barring pathology, the body doesn't ever waste anything, it is highly conservative. So, if you eat a large amount of protein at one sitting, a number of things happen, including changes in the rate of digestion to ensure that you can assimilate all of the valuable nutrients you have ingested. There is, of course, a limit to how much protein you can metabolize, but you would need to be ingesting ridiculous amounts for you to approach that limit. If you are in the range of .75g to 1g per kg of body mass, you should be fine, and I would say even if you were to eat all of it at one sitting.

          -PK

          (Thanks for visiting my blog. I've been neglecting it of late due to some potato fast madness ... )
          My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

          Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Timthetaco View Post
            I was reading a review paper about protein the other day. If you're into the whole science thing: From 2006
            Great paper.

            Thanks!

            -PK
            My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

            Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

            Comment


            • #21
              I just quickly checked out your blog. It looks great!

              Comment


              • #22
                I really like the diary article. So milk can raise insulin, but not glucose level? How does milk stiumlate glucagon?

                Thanks again and great job on your blog!

                Comment

                Working...
                X