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Just a.......spoon full of sugar!

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  • #16
    Xylitol is my own preference.

    I should add that I get through 4-6 cups of French-pressed freshly-ground coffee per day. I use about a 1/4 of a teaspoon per cup (and this is someone who once took 3 teaspoons of sugar in their coffee!)

    I'm not sure I agree with Shalimar about 1/2 the sweetening? I was using about 1/4 of a spoon of sugar, switched to xylitol, seemed the same? I certainly don't feel I'm depriving myself with xylitol.

    And yes, stevia has an aftertaste. Same as saccharin, which led me to wonder if the company was really giving me stevia or not? Then I tried some dried and ground up green stevia powder... same off-putting aftertaste.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
      The problem with "not as sweet" is when adding it as a "sweetener" you usually need more than you would of other sweeteners and therefore you end up consuming more calories overall.

      "Not as sweet" does not correlate with fewer calories or less of a blood sugar/insulin spike overall. In fact, if you need to use more because of its weaker flavors, expect more of both.
      What I like about glucose is that I know what it is and that ever cell in the body uses it for energy. I've read from different sources is that fructose should be kept to no more than 15g per day. Either way a spoon of sugar or dextrose, calorie wise, isn't very much to worry about.
      Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Scott F View Post
        What I like about glucose is that I know what it is and that ever cell in the body uses it for energy. I've read from different sources is that fructose should be kept to no more than 15g per day. Either way a spoon of sugar or dextrose, calorie wise, isn't very much to worry about.
        If he would use a "spoonful of sugar" which is already sweeter than dextrose, would he not need MORE than a spoonful of dextrose? That's my primary (if not my only) point here.

        You are assuming a spoonful of one is an equal substitute for the other. Not if they taste different they are not!
        "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
          If he would use a "spoonful of sugar" which is already sweeter than dextrose, would he not need MORE than a spoonful of dextrose? That's my primary (if not my only) point here.

          You are assuming a spoonful of one is an equal substitute for the other. Not if they taste different they are not!
          No I'm not assuming that and yes I know, dextrose is not as sweet as sugar but we aren't talking about that many calories either way. A tablespoon of sugar is 12 grams of carbs, 6 from glucose and 6 from fructose. If an adult should keep fructose consumption to no more than 15 grams per day, two tablespoons alone puts an adult male at 12 grams and near the 15 gram recommended limit. Honey and syrup will gives the same amount of fructose.

          Diets High in Fructose May Harm Liver in Some, Scientists Warn
          Liver ATP and uric acid levels also were measured in more than 100 patients who participated in a second study. Researchers measured the difference in liver ATP content between patients with low fructose consumption (less than 15 grams per day) and those with high fructose consumption (greater than 15 grams per day).

          The study revealed that participants with high dietary fructose consumption had lower liver ATP levels when the study began and a more significant change in ATP after the fructose test. The researchers also noted that those with high uric acid levels had lower ATP stores following high fructose intake.

          http://experiencelife.com/newsflashe...avorite-sugar/
          Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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          • #20
            I agree with all of your points. However, I am also a big proponent of "if he wants a little sugar" let him have it. This is why I suggested the "healthier" sugar alternatives. Each of us has to decide for themselves which risks they are or are not willing to take, and if he wants to eat a little sugar, why bother him about it?

            I do my best to cut the majority of sugar from my diet, but if others want to consume their sugar, let them.

            Just look at all of the folks here who swear by eating fruit by the truckload and seem to have perfectly fine weight and liver function. And they're CERTAINLY getting over their "15 grams" of daily fructose that is "safe" for us.
            "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

            Comment


            • #21
              I always wondered, if fructose was really so bad, wouldn't we see frutarians dropping like flies? I'm not saying they're healthy people, but they don't seem to have trouble losing weight on the diet and of all the health issues if seen with the diet, liver problems weren't one of them.
              Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own experience.

              In the mind of the beginner, there are many possibilities; in the mind of the expert, there are few.


              I've shaken hands with a raccoon and lived to tell the tale

              SW: 220- 225 pounds at the beginning of January
              CW: 180 pounds

              Goals for 2012: Lose a bit more fat and start a serious muscle and strength routine

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              • #22
                Thanks guys n gals, to be honest i don't desperately need that sugar in my coffee, and drink black herbal teas all the time, but when it comes to a good old cup of british tea, then i'm having milk in it lol so may try the RAW full fat milk or buy some cream for those special occasions

                I'm so intrigued about this butter in coffee thing!

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                • #23
                  It doesn't HAVE to be butter in the coffee if you go that route. Some people use coconut oil and others, an official MCT oil.

                  I suggest you experiment with both the coconut oil and the butter to see which one you prefer, just for taste's sake.
                  "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                    I agree with all of your points. However, I am also a big proponent of "if he wants a little sugar" let him have it. This is why I suggested the "healthier" sugar alternatives. Each of us has to decide for themselves which risks they are or are not willing to take, and if he wants to eat a little sugar, why bother him about it?

                    I do my best to cut the majority of sugar from my diet, but if others want to consume their sugar, let them.

                    Just look at all of the folks here who swear by eating fruit by the truckload and seem to have perfectly fine weight and liver function. And they're CERTAINLY getting over their "15 grams" of daily fructose that is "safe" for us.

                    I'm not bothering him, I'm simply giving a suggestion that nobody else made and a reason for that suggestion.
                    Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by @lex View Post
                      I always wondered, if fructose was really so bad, wouldn't we see frutarians dropping like flies? I'm not saying they're healthy people, but they don't seem to have trouble losing weight on the diet and of all the health issues if seen with the diet, liver problems weren't one of them.
                      You have to eat a lot of fruit to that much fructose. Plus the fruit comes with fiber which slows absorption. Some of it you won't even absorb. A percentage of people don't have the enzyme Fructokinase - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia in their intestines so they won't even absorb fructose. It makes them feel bad. But the more fructose you eat over time the better the body gets at making this enzyme. Fructose is the main culprit in metabolic syndrome and obesity Opposing effects of fructokinase C and A isoforms on fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in mice

                      Losing weight still comes down to calories in to calories out. A person can loose weight on a diet of Twinkies. But fructose increases the appetite and cause a person to crave more food Fructose Metabolism By The Brain Increases Food Intake And Obesity, Review Suggests
                      not to mention its hard on the kidneys Fructose, but not dextrose, accelerates the progression of chronic kidney disease
                      Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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