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Ordinary grain-fed beef -- a strategy

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  • Ordinary grain-fed beef -- a strategy

    If you must buy ordinary meats buy the leanest cuts: e.g. flank steak in place of fatty sirloin.

    If the grain-induced unfavorable omega 6:3 imbalance is concentrated in the fats, and markedly less so in the lean protein, then this may be a way to, in part, manage the omega 6 overload commonly encountered.

    Marinating these tougher cuts, as in a lemon/onion soup mixture tenderizes them and renders them succulent.

    The other deficiencies of feedlot beef are by no means entirely corrected but the omega 6 problem may well be greatly relieved.

    All comments and helpful rejoinders heartily welcomed.

  • #2
    I think the omega 6 "overload" is way overblown. Most of the fat in beef fat is saturated and monounsaturated fat. Only a small amount is polyunsaturated. I eat grainfed beef often (actually, it's simply unspecified and I assume it's grain finished). I can get ribeye that is pretty lean for $8/lb and fatty grassfed ribeye for $20-$25/lb. So if I want beef, what do you think I'm going to do most of the time? Get regular beef and eat a lot of salmon and sardines.
    Fat (1 Tbsp) Saturated (grams) Mono-unsaturated (grams) Poly-unsaturated (grams) Trans-fat (grams)
    Beef Tallow 6.4 5.4 0.5 0.0
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #3
      P.S. I don't know about where you live, but I do know that out here in the West cattle are grazed on public lands and sent to a feedlot for a few weeks at the end of life. So basically the CAFO beef out here is grass-fed, grain-finished.
      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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      • #4
        I buy grass-fed ground beef, chuck roast, ground lamb, and pasture-raised ground pork, pork chops, bacon, and pork shoulder roast because I can usually get those for under $8.00 an lb, usually more in the $7.00 range. But then, the steaks start getting up there in price, as do the more pricey roast cuts and lamb chops, ect.

        So for those cuts, I simply accept the prices and get the grain-fed stuff. And yes, fatty fish can help on weeks were I venture into a cut that I have to buy grain-fed.
        "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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        • #5
          I would be more worried about the hormones, antibiotics and water added to the meat than the grain. Once you grass fed though...no going back.
          Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
          PS
          Don't forget to play!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dirlot View Post
            I would be more worried about the hormones, antibiotics and water added to the meat than the grain. Once you grass fed though...no going back.
            This is mostly the reason I try to stick to grass-fed and pasture-raised as much as I can.

            Although I don't fuss about it on the off-chance that for some reason (eating out or cost), this isn't a possibility.
            "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

            Comment

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