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trigycerides went up, can this or something else explain it?

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  • trigycerides went up, can this or something else explain it?

    I recently got my blood work done and my Triglycerides went up from 70 to 96.
    I am trying to figure out why. Anybody have any ideas?
    I saw this below, it could be an explanation. Body fat loss and liver fat loss due to increased choline can dump triglycerides into the blood temporarily.
    Has anybody heard of this, is it legit?

    The Paleo Premise: Troubleshooting High Cholesterol on the Paleo Diet

    Fatty liver is a progressive disease, it affects 20-30% of the population as a disease state (even more people would have some degree of fatty liver) and is strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome. It can be caused by excessive alcohol, fructose, PUFAs and choline deficiency (and hepatitis). Choline is used to clear fats from the liver by exporting them in lipoproteins. Most people are somewhat choline deficient because of our high requirement for the nutrient and low consumption of choline rich foods (eggs and organ meats especially as well as other animal foods). So when they switch to a Paleo type diet and eat more of those foods their choline elevates, the liver now has the necessary nutrients to clear its fat deposits. The result is reversing fatty liver at the expense of a temporary increase in triglycerides and sometimes cholesterol.

    Losing body fat means that fat has to be mobilized and mobilizing the fat results in an increase of triglycerides. This can make your total cholesterol go up, your HDL go down (therefore lower HDL: triglyceride ratio) and the influx of triglycerides are packaged in VLDL which degrades into small, dense LDL as the triglycerides are used up. Once again this is a temporary increase in blood lipids resulting from a healthy metabolic context.
    An optimist is someone who falls off the Empire State Building, and after 50 floors says, 'So far so good!'
    -Somebody funny

  • #2
    If they were 70 before, it seems unlikely that you have a fatty liver. What do you weigh, and how much weight did you lose between the two tests?

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    • #3
      I weigh 150 now and lost about 25 pounds over the last 8 months.

      Originally posted by Timthetaco View Post
      If they were 70 before, it seems unlikely that you have a fatty liver. What do you weigh, and how much weight did you lose between the two tests?
      An optimist is someone who falls off the Empire State Building, and after 50 floors says, 'So far so good!'
      -Somebody funny

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Ouaouaron View Post
        I weigh 150 now and lost about 25 pounds over the last 8 months.
        This...from the article you link can account for it also "Two standard deviations for total cholesterol is 0.92 mmol/l (35mg/dl), for HDL-C is 0.25 mmol/l (9.5 mg/dl), for LDL-C is 0.79 mmol/l (30 mg/dl), for triglycerides is 0.36 mmol/l (40 mg/dl) and for the HDL-C: LDL-C ratio is 0.8. Therefore your blood lipids could increase or decrease by those ranges simply due to normal variation. "

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        • #5
          The tests were eight months apart? I'm really not sure why your triglycerides increased. It could be perfectly normal deviation, doesn't seem like much to worry about. However, I'd test again in a few months to see if the number continues to increase.

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          • #6
            The formula for blood cholesterol levels is: Total cholesterol = LDL + HDL + VLDL/5

            Few people know that we can only measure total cholesterol and HDL with the standard blood test. Yes – 1 equation, 4 unknowns, 2 measurable = not very scientific.

            After measuring (albeit inaccurately and inconsistently) total cholesterol and HDL, VLDL and LDL together are assumed to account for the difference. The estimation is refined with the Friedewald equation, using the estimate that VLDL is 22% cholesterol to establish the final equation:

            Total cholesterol = LDL + HDL + VLDL/5

            If you really want to know your true lipid status, you should have your doctor order an NMR Lipoprofile. It is the only test that directly measures all lipid components!

            Comment


            • #7
              The formula for blood cholesterol levels is: Total cholesterol = LDL + HDL + VLDL/5

              Few people know that we can only measure total cholesterol and HDL with the standard blood test. Yes – 1 equation, 4 unknowns, 2 measurable = not very scientific.

              After measuring (albeit inaccurately and inconsistently) total cholesterol and HDL, VLDL and LDL together are assumed to account for the difference. The estimation is refined with the Friedewald equation, using the estimate that VLDL is 22% cholesterol to establish the final equation:

              Total cholesterol = LDL + HDL + VLDL/5

              VLDL is a stand-in for triglycerides.

              If you really want to know your true lipid status, you should have your doctor order an NMR Lipoprofile. It is the only test that directly measures all lipid components!

              Comment


              • #8
                What does this formula tell us?

                using VLDL-C I have a total of 230.6



                Originally posted by drfmd View Post
                The formula for blood cholesterol levels is: Total cholesterol = LDL + HDL + VLDL/5

                Few people know that we can only measure total cholesterol and HDL with the standard blood test. Yes – 1 equation, 4 unknowns, 2 measurable = not very scientific.

                After measuring (albeit inaccurately and inconsistently) total cholesterol and HDL, VLDL and LDL together are assumed to account for the difference. The estimation is refined with the Friedewald equation, using the estimate that VLDL is 22% cholesterol to establish the final equation:

                Total cholesterol = LDL + HDL + VLDL/5

                VLDL is a stand-in for triglycerides.

                If you really want to know your true lipid status, you should have your doctor order an NMR Lipoprofile. It is the only test that directly measures all lipid components!
                An optimist is someone who falls off the Empire State Building, and after 50 floors says, 'So far so good!'
                -Somebody funny

                Comment


                • #9
                  It goes to show that the traditional lipid profile is not very reliable. What were your total cholesterol and HDL-C?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by drfmd View Post
                    It goes to show that the traditional lipid profile is not very reliable. What were your total cholesterol and HDL-C?
                    It is exciting to see an MD get involved in the paleo/primal world! I have been blessed enough to find a functional med practitioner in my area and wish there were more in the medical field involved in preventative medicine. Welcome!
                    You know all those things you wanted to do: You should go do them.

                    Age 48
                    height 5'3
                    SW 215 lbs
                    CW 180 lbs (whole foods/primal eating)
                    LW 172 lbs
                    GW 125ish lbs

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