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  • Sugar replacement in recipes



    Hi all,


    Looking for ideas on replacing sugar in 'common' recipes. Also suggestions on flour replacement. I am thinking of coconut flour, but what would be your ratio?


    Thanks.


  • #2
    1



    we've used almond flour, raw honey would be an option, but it's got a high GI, some use agave nectar...most things don't need anything if you use coconut or some fruit as that provides it's own natural sugars...

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    • #3
      1



      Depending on what I'm making, for sweetener I either use liquid stevia, or Z-sweet (Erythritol) which is granular like sugar.

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      • #4
        1



        you really can't do a 1 to 1 change in recipes to much other than flour, depending on the recipe, of course. With regular flour, gluten happens, and the stickiness is vital to many recipes in various forms.


        A lot of people use almond meal, flax meal or coconut flour for various recipes in varying amounts. For example, without gluten, making a tortilla is quite difficult. But, a regular bread isn't so bad.


        For sweetener, honey also works pretty well.

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        • #5
          1



          vanilla extract works for me sometimes

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          • #6
            1



            I use stevia, xylitol and honey. Mostly stevia though. I dont bake so much anymore so I dont need to sub. Also, I would think that if you used coco flour you would need to check the ratios. Coco flour absorbs A LOT of liquid... way more than flour does.


            What are you making?

            Life on Earth may be punishing, but it includes an annual free trip around the sun!

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            • #7
              1



              Tara tootie...

              I am trying to make things like loafs, muffins, etc. with coconut flour.


              Sugar note...

              As for sugar substitute, I am more looking for a way to 'remove' the ingredient without 'destroying' the recipe! I will add a 'touch' of sweet, but it's more that if I just remove the sugar, will by recipe 'flop'?

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              • #8
                1



                Douran. . .take a look at the amount of sugar and see what the wet-to-dry ratio is. You might want to cut down bit on the liquids. I'd also suggest finding some recipes around the internet and see what their ratios are.

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                • #9
                  1



                  ...Beginner questions...


                  Catalina, is sugar wet or dry?


                  I'm guessing wet, because of the 'steps' to follow in most recipes, but not sure.


                  Thanks for the great info guys! I'm no GREAT cook and appreciate the help.

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                  • #10
                    1



                    Sugar would be a dry ingredient. . .think about an old-fashioned cake mix (yuck!), where all of the dry ingredients (flour, sugar, etc.) are in there, and you just add egg and oil.

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                    • #11
                      1



                      There is a great book that I bought on Amazon and it is loaded with making things with Xylitol. The author also incorporated substitutions like applesauce & coconut flour too.


                      There are also great books out there for baking with Coconut Flour (on Amazon). Also, the blogger "Elana's Pantry" has some interesting recipes with alternative sugars, coconut flour and Almond Flour.


                      It's best to use a recipe specifically using these alternative flours and sugars, since the recipe creator did significant experimentation.

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Nope, sugar is considered a "wet" ingredient.


                        I would say that for muffins and such you may be fine due to the leavenings. For the loaf thing, dont expect an airy loaf with coco flour. The gluten isnt there so you wont get nice bubbles... Maybe you could buy some wheat gluten... 1 oz only had 4 carbs and would DEF improve the consistency of your baked goods.


                        Also, in things where sugar plays a large part (cookies) I think it would be difficult to end up with a comparable product. Gluten AND sugar contribute to chewiness, and without both of those?


                        Good luck! Keep us updated.

                        Life on Earth may be punishing, but it includes an annual free trip around the sun!

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