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Canned tuna fish?

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  • Canned tuna fish?

    Is it okay to eat canned tuna fish in olive oil as a snack? I do this kind of frequently between classes on campus. I don't know what else is okay to eat that is no hassle, and I'd be lying if I said I wasn't tempted by the Chik-fil-a so I need something to fight the cravings!

  • #2
    I've heard you should not eat tuna more than once or twice a month due to the high levels of mercury. You might want to do a little research online about tuna and mercury.
    Try keeping nuts or jerky with you for snacking.

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    • #3
      Also read your labels. Many tunas contain soy, even the ones supposedly in water

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      • #4
        I think the canned kind, unsafe packaging aside, is supposed to be lower in heavy metal than the fresh since the fish are mostly wild-caught and not farmed although as with most very large fish, you will want to limit consumption to be absolutely safe.
        F 28/5'4/100 lbs

        "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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        • #5
          Canned Salmon

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          • #6
            I eat the hell out of it and haven't died yet. I've literally found two brands out of the billion at my grocery that doesn't have soy as an ingredient... Both are Starkist Premium brand, so about twice the price of plain ol tuna. The evoo version is awesome.

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            • #7
              Also, if you're looking for BPA free cans, a search at Amazon brings up a brand called Crown Prince. Wild caught, no BPA, and I went to the website and there's no soy. The 24 pack is $61.05 which works out to about $6.78 per pound which is a really reasonable price for a very convenient protein. Also, their wild salmon is even less per pound.

              Glad you asked the question! I haven't eaten tuna in months because I wasn't about to pay the high prices for the priviledge of having packaging that doesn't hurt my health. But this is so reasonable, I may just stock up again.
              "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

              B*tch-lite

              Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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              • #8
                if you're concerned about mercury, eat other canned fish, like salmon, mackerel, herring and sardines. it's not a problem with fish very low on the food chain and small in size.
                As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                Ernest Hemingway

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Damiana View Post
                  I think the canned kind, unsafe packaging aside, is supposed to be lower in heavy metal than the fresh since the fish are mostly wild-caught and not farmed although as with most very large fish, you will want to limit consumption to be absolutely safe.
                  I think the opposite is true. Wild tuna often live longer than farmed fish so they have more time to accumulate mercury in their system. The issues with farm raised fish are more often about PCBs from the crap they're fed. However, certain kinds of tuna have plenty of both.
                  Take a look at this to find healthier fish alternatives.
                  List of Seafood Health Alerts - Seafood Selector - Environmental Defense Fund

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                  • #10
                    there is very little farmed tuna on the market right now. it's not yet as viable as salmon or shrimp-farming.
                    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                    Ernest Hemingway

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                    • #11
                      AFAIK, no study has demonstrated a risk of mercury poisoning from wildcaught fish. While some tuna do have higher levels, the selenium also present reduces the bioavailability of the mercury. I eat canned fish five or six times per week. One is usually albacore for its favourable DHA profile
                      Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                      Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                      • #12
                        I would restrain from Bumble Bee (I think it was) for a time. They found a worker steamed alive in one of the tanks that processes the fish. Poor person. Poor safety practices and yuck factor tell me no canned tuna!

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