Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Primally neglected veggies...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Jena View Post
    Awesome thread! I have been having issues with veggies lately... I feel like all I eat is broccoli. I occasionally have zucchini and carrots, but that's really been the extent of my vegetable intake lately. Well, that and lettuce for salads. I think I am just going to go to the store and grab some veggies that look interesting and then challenge myself to cook something with it! More ideas please, lol
    Underutilized veggies for beginners:

    Mustard green
    Turnip greens
    Radish green
    Horseradish
    Sauerkraut
    Okra
    Butternut squash (mash that crap like taters)
    Seaweed
    Kohlrabi
    Celeriac
    Red and green malabar spinach
    Jimca

    Just to name a few...
    "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

    Comment


    • #17
      Brussels sprouts, zucchini, squash, eggplant, cauliflower, beets and spaghetti squash are all fairly ordinary vegetables. I thought the question was about the unusual, forgotten ones. I would say that mustard greens probably count for that. Rutabagas, perhaps, and maybe celery root, too. Definitely kholrabi is rarely spoken of around here.

      I've been considering figuring out what to do with culinary lavender. Seems the guy at the farmer's market who sells bitter melon does a brisk business with those. I ought to try that some time.
      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

      Comment


      • #18
        Tomatillos are fun, too, but possibly not available much beyond Central and Southern America, and the Southern US. They're a relative of the gooseberry, but look like little green tomatos in green husks. They're tart and green tomato like. I love a lamb tomatillo stew, with turnips instead of potatos.
        Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
        My Latest Journal

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
          Brussels sprouts, zucchini, squash, eggplant, cauliflower, beets and spaghetti squash are all fairly ordinary vegetables. I thought the question was about the unusual, forgotten ones. I would say that mustard greens probably count for that. Rutabagas, perhaps, and maybe celery root, too. Definitely kholrabi is rarely spoken of around here.

          I've been considering figuring out what to do with culinary lavender. Seems the guy at the farmer's market who sells bitter melon does a brisk business with those. I ought to try that some time.
          Culinary lavender... If I had someone at my market here sold that, I'd give it a go!

          Oh, and one of my caves in the brassica group! Bok choy! Had some tonight, and it was delish!
          "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
            Eggplant. I make kind of an eggplant slop. Skin and cube the eggplant, toss it in an oiled pan. Cover 'til soft. Throw in some tomato paste and a little water. Stir some more. Over the top, toss in some small pieces of room temp mozzarella. Turn off the heat and cover to let the cheese melt. Looks like slop, tastes like a messy eggplant parmagiana. Spices: garlic in at the end, pepper, dried oregano or basil, or whatever you like.
            I make an eggplant slop too! Useful when you don't want to bother with eggplant parmesan.

            I bake eggplant when making something else, just poke a few holes and thrown in the oven whole. After it cools, scoop out and mix with a bit of olive oil, some garlic, tomato sauce, and mozzarella. It's NOT as good as eggplant parmesan, but SO much less work!

            Comment


            • #21
              My fave is not unusual so much as just cooked differently. Basically, cabbage sliced thinly like for cole slaw, but stir fried. I tend to do it with some fatty hamburger, fresh minced ginger and garlic, and tamari. It's one of hubby's favorites.

              Also, around here, okra is QUITE rare (Pennsylvania). I grow it myself so I can eat some.

              Pumpkin and/or winter squash. Not just as mashed or baked squash, but shredded and fried like hash browns, made into soup with ginger and good stock, cubed and added to stew.

              Speaking of cubed and added to stew, I freaking love rutabagas. It's more strongly flavored than turnip, so don't make a HUGE stew until you've tried it in case you don't like it.

              Comment


              • #22
                Artichoke hearts. I chop them in the food processor, and add a little mayonnaise and/or sour cream to make a dip that I serve on top of salmon or tomato slices.
                Also, baby cucumbers as a snack vegetable in packed lunches. We get different varieties of these in our Hispanic market, but I think most people just think of cucumbers as salad food. I have had people do a double take when they see me eat a whole one, as is.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                  Brussels sprouts, zucchini, squash, eggplant, cauliflower, beets and spaghetti squash are all fairly ordinary vegetables. I thought the question was about the unusual, forgotten ones. I would say that mustard greens probably count for that. Rutabagas, perhaps, and maybe celery root, too. Definitely kholrabi is rarely spoken of around here.

                  I've been considering figuring out what to do with culinary lavender. Seems the guy at the farmer's market who sells bitter melon does a brisk business with those. I ought to try that some time.
                  Be careful with the lavender - too much makes things taste like soap. Try infusing some heavy cream with just a pinch, then straining and pouring over berries or something. Also, lavender is a part of herbs de provence, so it can go into any rustic French stew. Just be sure to tie it up in a bouquet garni, because the little pieces aren't very pleasant to actually chew on.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by naiadknight View Post
                    Summer squash, in any form. Around here, it seems folks only use it as noodles, but it can do so much more. Grill it, saute it, shred it into a hashbrown like thing, dehydrate it into chips, roast it... the possibilities are endless.
                    Turnip greens. Rinse 'em well and they have the peppery kick of the root vegetable they're attached to. Boil and mash 'em for mashed 'taters you don't hafta add pepper to. Roast 'em with carrots and squash to add a fun kick.
                    Not to sound too dumb but do you mind explainging,shred it into a hashbrown thing...that sounds awesome.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Kale. I steam it with garlic, and often mixed with red cabbage.
                      Meat is Prized, Wheat is Despised.

                      Real Food - The REAL staff of life

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by ashley.thepie.rat View Post
                        Not to sound too dumb but do you mind explainging,shred it into a hashbrown thing...that sounds awesome.
                        Slice it in half and scoop out the seeds with a spoon. Run it through the big hole side of a shredder. Gather it into a tea towel and squeeze out the water. Get 1/8" oil of choice (I use bacon or italian sausage grease because it's awesome) to frying eggs hot. Put the zuke shreds into the pan, keeping it to no more than hashbrown thickness (1 layer zuke to 1/4" thick). Fry it until the bottoms are happy brown (5-15 min depending on thickness, keep checking it), then flip and wait again. Plate and serve.
                        Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
                        My Latest Journal

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by naiadknight View Post
                          Slice it in half and scoop out the seeds with a spoon. Run it through the big hole side of a shredder. Gather it into a tea towel and squeeze out the water. Get 1/8" oil of choice (I use bacon or italian sausage grease because it's awesome) to frying eggs hot. Put the zuke shreds into the pan, keeping it to no more than hashbrown thickness (1 layer zuke to 1/4" thick). Fry it until the bottoms are happy brown (5-15 min depending on thickness, keep checking it), then flip and wait again. Plate and serve.
                          yummm. you just made my day..i never would of thought of that. thanks :]

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I forgot images have to be approved




                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I also like kai lan. Ooh, and fiddleheads when they're in season. Jicama is good. Pattypan squash are a nice alternative as a summer squash and one I don't see people talk about often here. And brocoflower (a broccoli-cauliflower hybrid) is awesome if for no other reason than it looks freaky.
                              “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

                              Owly's Journal

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I'm also a huge fan of rutabaga, mustard greens, and turnip greens. And bok choi. I don't eat those things nearly often enough.

                                Here's my typical bok choy method: Cut the greens off from the stalk. Slice stalks into 1/4" half moons. Saute them in some fat along with some sliced onion until tender, about 8 minutes. Then I add the greens and cook until they're just tender, about 2 minutes. Sometimes I add some sesame oil and tamari. Sometimes butter, salt, and pepper.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X