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  • #16
    One time I cooked bones for the dogs in the pressure cooker thinking it would toughen them up. Nope. They crumbled. Bones get really soft in the pressure cooker.
    Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.

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    • #17
      Gopintos, thanks for sharing the details. I am thinking I would not like the texture either but it is an idea worth contemplating...

      Honeybuns! Just when I was about convinced to go with a crock pot, you post this!!! LOL! I would seriously prefer a pressure cooker (based on the time I have) but am concerned about "high rapid heat" damaging something. From what I am about now gathering is it is a matter of preference

      I so appreciate all the replies and ideas! Thank you!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dynamo View Post
        Gopintos, thanks for sharing the details. I am thinking I would not like the texture either but it is an idea worth contemplating...
        yw. See, I like the texture, nice and thick, like I am eating something more substantial, rather than just drinking some broth. In fact, whether I use a bowl or a cup, I still use a spoon. Mental I know, but I think I am eating I guess
        65lbs gone and counting!!

        Fat 2 Fit - One Woman's Journey

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Dynamo View Post
          When you crockers set the pot on low for 8 hours, do you keep the lid tight? When you go back to look at it in 8 hours has any water evaporated? (I am not a crocker so this would be my first time). Do you just put the broth in the fridge, still in the crock pot when you let it cool down? I am thinking that after it cools and I want to make the chicken soup I can just skim the fat and plug the unit back in, adding my veggies and chicken.
          With the lid on and after 12 hours, I see very little evaporation. When I used to do it on the stove, I was constantly adding water back. I strain the broth before putting it in the frig, so it's no longer in the crock pot. I used to skim the fat, but don't any more. I don't generally make a point to eat extra fat, but neither do I avoid it. From good meat, it adds a nice flavor to the broth, IMO.
          50yo, 5'3"
          SW-195
          CW-125, part calorie counting, part transition to primal
          GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

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          • #20
            Originally posted by LauraSB View Post
            I used to skim the fat, but don't any more. I don't generally make a point to eat extra fat, but neither do I avoid it. From good meat, it adds a nice flavor to the broth, IMO.
            I get rid of the chicken fat because of this statement from Mark:

            Speaking of fat, I’d toss poultry fat. It’s a relatively high-PUFA animal fat, and a day of simmering has probably damaged it beyond repair. If you’re stewing bones with more saturated animal fat, though, you should absolutely save the fat layer.

            Read more: Cooking with Bones | Mark's Daily Apple
            65lbs gone and counting!!

            Fat 2 Fit - One Woman's Journey

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            • #21
              After I slow cook for 24+ hours with some ACV and whatever random kitchen bits I think might be useful, I put everything through a regular strainer and then a mesh strainer, then I pour the liquid back in the crockpot and and some powdered kelp and a cube of himalayan salt (was found at Marshall's for cheap). Simmer that a few more hours until the salt is dissolved. Adds iodine and minerals to make it extra healthy and stuff.

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              • #22
                I have done it all 3 ways, on the stove, in a crockpot and in a pressure cooker.

                When doing bone-only broths, I throw veggies right in (I save veggie peelings in a container in the freezer until making broth).

                When doing meat/bone broths, I make veggie broth first and use that instead of water to make the meat broth, since I am going to "rescue" the meat and it's easier to not have to pull onion peelings off of bits of meat.

                I save bones from foods like steak or chops until I have enough. When using bought bones, I usually roast them first. I save carcasses from both roasted chickens and turkeys to make broth from (and if you do it in the roasting pan, it's way easy to clean).

                I always use vinegar and don't care if it's "good" or not as the mother is going to get boiled to death anyways. I keep cheapo vinegar around for cleaning, so am more likely to use that. The point of vinegar is to acidify the water so more minerals are leached into the broth; it just needs to be edible and acidic.

                Until recently, I considered 1-2 quarts broth/week to be good for me and my husband, so a pint to a quart per person per week.

                However, I recently started GAPS and am doing a pint to a quart per DAY just myself. If you're going for gut healing, you need a LOT of broth.

                Hubby does not like broth much, he never finishes the liquid in stews and soups. So he gets things like chili made with broth instead of water, or risotto, where the food is thickened up enough that the broth cannot be avoided!

                I like broth straight, especially chicken broth, which I can drink cup after cup of easily. Beef, pork and ham broths I prefer in soups and stews rather than straight.

                Lots more info here: GAPS for T2 diabetes: beef broth

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