Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Low-fat "light" Yogurts. I assume they're crap/bad. But exactly how?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Low-fat "light" Yogurts. I assume they're crap/bad. But exactly how?

    Just how even "health" cereals are just low-fat, high-carb, I assume these yogurts are not Primal and are bad. Can someone give me the once over for all of these fruit yogurts that are marketed as healthy, when I know they're not? The obvious ones are loaded with sugar, but some are more vague:

    Light & Fit® Greek - Dannon Light & Fit®

    This one is 80 calories. What's the deal with being sweetened with fructose, sucralose and acesulfame potassium, ?

    Low fat, fine. Low calories, fine.

    I see it's got sugar/carbs. But at only 80 calories, how bad can it be?
    How much is from natural fructose in the fruit vs. added sucrose, etc.
    Also, artificial sweeteners are bad how? Blocking leptin/grehlin/peptide X?

  • #2
    It's probably bad. If I understand it correctly, yogurt isn't primal. I eat yogurt, but I wouldn't eat this one - low fat isn't fine and all this extra garbage isn't fine.
    Last edited by anna5; 10-02-2012, 09:52 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm not feeling like I have a good enough handle to explain all the sciency bits.

      I will say that one of the biggest problems I have, or people in general have, with artificial sweeteners is that they are WAY MORE sweet than any naturally occurring sugar. As we consume more and more of the artificial sweeteners, we become more and more immune to sweetness, to the point where things like honey or fruit no longer taste "sweet enough" for our tastebuds. We need to have ever escalating amounts of sweetener to get the same good sweet feeling. Just like a drug. >.<
      yay!

      Comment


      • #4
        They contain sugar and they are low fat. That's a double whammy! Even if it contains sugar substitute, which some people use and some don't, it's still low fat which is going to leave you hungry very quickly. If you're looking to do a low cal CW diet I imagine that this is something you might want to eat. I don't think it's the worst thing in the world, but its definitely not primal. Try Greek yogurt (plain, full fat) and sweeten it with honey. If I don't want the extra calories I will occasionally sweeten my Greek yogurt with sugar-free preserves.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by qqemokitty View Post
          I'm not feeling like I have a good enough handle to explain all the sciency bits.

          I will say that one of the biggest problems I have, or people in general have, with artificial sweeteners is that they are WAY MORE sweet than any naturally occurring sugar. As we consume more and more of the artificial sweeteners, we become more and more immune to sweetness, to the point where things like honey or fruit no longer taste "sweet enough" for our tastebuds. We need to have ever escalating amounts of sweetener to get the same good sweet feeling. Just like a drug. >.<
          I have heard that the sugar free sweeteners make some people crave sweets more. So this is something to watch for. I definitely limit my intake of them, but don't seem to have a problem with occasional use. Some may though.

          Comment


          • #6
            Did you read the label?
            There are like a dozen ingredients.
            Milk from factory cows... not organic, fed soy, likely shot full of rBST.
            Corn starch... GMO.
            A bunch of preservatives...
            How is that anything close to a good natural product?

            I certainly wouldn't eat it.


            Lots of people here eat yogurt and fermented milk products(including store bought greek yogurts... just NOT that one.)
            Some even consume milk, though that tends to be raw, grassfed, local dairy.

            What you need to now about Dairy... read this.
            The Definitive Guide to Dairy | Mark's Daily Apple

            Then make your decision.


            Most of the time I make my own yogurt from raw, local, grassfed dairy. I do understand that that process is not for everyone though.
            In my house... there is sometimes also store bought full fat plain Greek yogurt from a company that used NO rBST/BGH. The ingredients are: Milk, cultures.
            Nothing else.
            I also suggest organic if you can get it.

            Plain yogurt is very easy to flavor... just add some fruit and a little bit of honey, maybe a sprinkle of nuts if you wish... delicious.
            I also like to add a little bit of vanilla bean paste to mine. So good.
            Last edited by cori93437; 10-02-2012, 10:09 AM.
            “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
            ~Friedrich Nietzsche
            And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

            Comment


            • #7
              Ok so the low fat isn't bad. Especially since it's not organic it's actually better. But corn starch and fructose and diarrhea in the yogurt is probably not very good
              well then

              Comment


              • #8
                gadsie's dead-on right. nothing wrong with low fat. lots of dairy products are traditionally low fat when they're made, as the fat from milk is often reserved for cream or butter. it's all the other crap you have to watch out for!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Not only everything everybody else said, but brands like dannon or yoplait are basically dead foods. It's better to make your own. Buy one container of plain, unsweetened, unflavored yogurt with live cultures and use that to start your own yogurt. Your own yogurt will be alive with cultures and you can use healthier milk. You can then flavor it however you want. Or you can strain it to make Greek yogurt. If you don't like it, then it's probably because you don't really like yogurt. Companies like dannon and yoplait make you think you are eating yogurt but what you're really eating is sweet, pudding-like processed food.
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You want to limit all your sources of fructose. Here's why: The Skinny on Obesity (Ep. 2): Sickeningly Sweet - UCTV - University of California Television All 7 of the episodes are here: The Skinny on Obesity - UCTV Prime - UCTV - University of California Television

                    Fructose is in just about everything processed as "low fat." It's used in crackers, bread, yogurts, ice cream, sodas, sports drinks, canned fruits. mustard, catchup, etc. Go to a chain restaurant and order a supposedly health salad and the dressing will be made with fructose as a sweetening agent. So throughout a week of eating the consumption of fructose can add up.

                    Dr Richard Johnson MD, University of Colorado, and his lab team build upon the above links with their research. Basically, any food you'd consume that raises your body's uric acid will affect your cells' ability to produce energy (ATP) that then sets up the Insulin and Leptin resistance the UCTV episodes talk about. Johnson describes the Metabolic Syndrome as the Fat Storage Mechanism. All animals put on season fat to get through lean months by eating foods that raises uric acids. For humans and other fruit/berry eating animals fructose is the trigger that flips the switch. Here's an interview with Dr Johnson discussing the "fat switch." The Fat Switch Book | Weight Control Guide - Mercola.com

                    Some everyday sources of fructose: Top food sources of Fructose. The food industry is bombarding you with this stuff.

                    Fructans are a polymer of fructose bound together that some plants use to store energy. Gut bacteria break the fructan bonds into fructose. Wheat is the primary source of fructans in the diet. Fructans In The Diet | LIVESTRONG.COM
                    Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jakey View Post
                      gadsie's dead-on right. nothing wrong with low fat. lots of dairy products are traditionally low fat when they're made, as the fat from milk is often reserved for cream or butter. it's all the other crap you have to watch out for!
                      This always gets me...
                      tra·di·tion·al/trəˈdiSHənl/
                      Adjective:
                      Existing in or as part of a tradition; long-established.
                      Produced, done, or used in accordance with tradition.

                      As a part of what "tradition"?
                      Mostly a modern, electrical, big cow dairy farm, readily available refrigeration tradition...

                      Before modern times it depended on location, climate, season, and status.
                      If you were a regular farmer with a milk cow in a temperate zone, in the cool months, sure you skimmed the cream and saved it a few days to gather with the cream from other days, then made some butter.
                      If you were rich and rand a large farm with hands to run a small dairy, those folks skimmed daily... possibly even in summer... because they didn't have to gather together several days worth of cream to get enough for a single batch. This was for rich people.
                      But in the summer if you were a regular guy with a milk cow, you didn't skim that cream and save it for several days to get a batch to beat into butter... it would rot. You made yogurt, or cottage cheese, that day... at full fat and ate it. Or sold it, or traded it... Because to do otherwise was a waste.
                      In other places where people didn't have cattle, and instead had sheep or goats (The first yogurts were from goat milk) there was no skimming unless the milk could be held at very cold refrigerator like temperatures for 3-4 days. Because goats and sheeps milk does not separate like cow dairy.

                      Cow dairy taking over the world as the primary dairy is sort of modern as well... it goes hand in hand with that refrigeration.
                      Back before that more people could afford and could feed a few family goats or sheep.
                      Cows take a nice large pasture, sheep a rather smaller lot, goats... they will thrive on rocky ground and prefer scrub.

                      Traditional... is a funny thing.

                      Sure there is a place for some "low fat" dairy products... just don't forget why they exist.
                      They were made when it was convenient for the people making them, seasonally.
                      And according to location, type of dairy... so in some regions the people really never ate any low fat dairy at all... because it was very, very hard to separate the cream of the type of dairy they used.
                      Butter and the skimming of cream didn't become a regular thing unless it was in a very rich household until the advent of modern times.
                      The butter and cream went to the rich guy, or the cow owner in the seasons he was lucky enough to treat himself. The low fat left overs went to the kitchen maids and the dogs or pigs, or into the cow owners wife's cooking pot if she was really frugal... which she likely was.

                      Even when large farms came about, and early factory processing came about, before milk trucks were refrigerated there were often entire summer deliveries of milk that were too clabbered by the time they reached the factory to be skimmed. They were used whole for full fat cheeses.
                      So still seasonal... until very recently.
                      “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                      ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                      And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by OnlyBodyWeight View Post
                        Just how even "health" cereals are just low-fat, high-carb, I assume these yogurts are not Primal and are bad. Can someone give me the once over for all of these fruit yogurts that are marketed as healthy, when I know they're not? The obvious ones are loaded with sugar, but some are more vague:

                        Light & Fit® Greek - Dannon Light & Fit®

                        This one is 80 calories. What's the deal with being sweetened with fructose, sucralose and acesulfame potassium, ?

                        Low fat, fine. Low calories, fine.

                        I see it's got sugar/carbs. But at only 80 calories, how bad can it be?
                        How much is from natural fructose in the fruit vs. added sucrose, etc.
                        Also, artificial sweeteners are bad how? Blocking leptin/grehlin/peptide X?
                        I'm a huge advocate for avoiding artificial sugars, so sucralose (Splenda; I'm sure they don't call it Splenda on purpose) makes this a 'nope' for me right off the bat. I just don't enjoy putting laboratory created food products into my body. I formed my opinion based on a negative reaction to Aspartame (Nutrasweet) years and years ago: headaches, dizziness, balance/coordination deficits (so bad I was tested for a brain tumor). So, take it for what its worth. I just don't like any of them but I know little about Splenda. Same with the Acesulfame K.

                        Then, the whole process of how they make milk 'skim' is not pleasant. Basically, the fat free milk is fortified with dry milk to increase the protein content (add back what has been taken away). That dried milk is made at high temperatures which damages the nutrients. Vitamin A must be added back, because any natural form of it was also taken away during the de-fatting process (A is a fat soluble vitamin). If it is not synthetically fortified, any Vitamin A needed to process the added proteins is taken from the liver; could lead to depletion over time if you do not get enough Vitamin A from other sources.

                        A sneaky side of the whole fat-free dairy issue is that the cream/fat that is extracted is then used in other products. Gives more profit from the same quantity of milk to the company at the expense of giving you a lower quality yogurt.

                        Are you eating this to reduce your calorie intake? Fat in your diet will actually curb your appetite and lead to a lower calorie intake overall *without* the horrible feeling of deprivation and hunger! Fat is needed for you to utilize the protein in dairy so fat-free dairy isn't as nutritious as you'd hope because you might not be getting a lot of the nutrients.

                        if you are looking for some quality food to put into your body that isn't freaking you out with calories, then go for full-fat, plain yogurt. It is GOOD. Greek yogurt is decadent. Not a whole lot of calories that tastes so good going down.
                        sigpic
                        Age 48
                        Start date: 7-5-12
                        5'3"
                        121lbs
                        GOAL: to live to be a healthy and active 100


                        "In health there is freedom. Health is the first of all liberties."
                        Henri Frederic Amiel

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Find yourself a nice organic whole milk yogurt if you want yogurt! Around here I can get several kinds that are decent but maybe not everyone is so lucky.

                          Anything that should have fat in it but it made low fat is processed to death even if it was not sweetened.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                            Companies like dannon and yoplait make you think you are eating yogurt but what you're really eating is sweet, pudding-like processed food.
                            This is the problem with most yogurts out there. Most yogurts throw a bunch of sugar and some artificial fruit flavors in a dairy product, and try to market it as "health food".

                            Start with the plain, unsweetened stuff(greek or regular) - add some whole/chopped fruit if it fits your tastes, or maybe a bit of cinnamon or other spices. Many of the flavored(not plain) commercial yogurts out there are closer to sugary desserts than healthy snacks, nutritionally speaking.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              According to Christmas stories my mom told me when I was young, the cream is skimmed off and left out for your nisse.
                              Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X