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What's that fat up to in the blood stream?

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  • What's that fat up to in the blood stream?

    Any experts on this?
    I am wondering because there are a lot of people who claim, and have some science to prove, it that fat slows down the blood flow and also inhibits the cell uptake of sugars, leading to higher blood sugar with excess fat. Have any of our paleo gurus covered this? I know fat is carried in the blood with certain proteins but what are the effects of its presence on our blood flow, and biochemistry of the blood? I know it's carried by certain proteins.

    Did some searching but didn't find much on this particularly. I am sure someone must have covered this but yeah, anyone save me hours of googling? Some people say that's why carbs become so much a problem on a high fat diet, because the metabolism is hindered. Thanks!

  • #2
    Look up insulin and what it does.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #3
      Serum Triglycerides (fat in the bloodstream) are caused by excess carbohydrate consumption.
      Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

      Griff's cholesterol primer
      5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
      Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
      TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
      bloodorchid is always right

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      • #4
        Insulin increases the uptake of glucose into the cells of the body...
        But fat travels in the blood stream, it's part of it's digestion, and when you eat fat, it is in your blood stream. I am not saying that's a bad thing, I just wonder how it affects the metabolism of glucose, and circulation and whatnot, because some doctors claim it dos so in a negative way.

        Each villus contains blood capillaries and small lymphatic vessels called lacteals. Glucose and amino acids move through the epithelial cells and into the blood capillaries, and travels via the hepatic portal vein to the liver for processing. Fatty acids and glycerol are packaged by epithelial cells and moved into lacteals. The lymphatic vessels later dump them into the bloodstream.

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        • #5
          I'm no expert, but I'm trying to think logically...

          I imagine fat circulates through the bloodstream, what's needed gets burned for fuel, what's not needed immediately gets tucked away in fat cells until it's needed for energy, at which point the ideally-functioning body pulls it out of the cells and burns it.

          Sugar is just this toxic stuff that for some reason most people are convinced it's okay to eat tons of. Put sugar in your body, the body will go into overdrive (insulin spike) trying to get it out of the bloodstream, meaning all the fat gets stored while the sugar is burned, and once all the sugar is gone (by gone I mean, out of the bloodstream and wreaking havoc on your cells instead) then the body can return to the normal conditions described in the first paragraph.

          This is my 8th grade level reasoning. I am a journalist and not a science major for a reason.

          Edit: regarding the idea of a hindered metabolism... that wouldn't surprise me at all. I think my metabolism is slower than it used to be. I think this is because it CAN be--i.e. it no longer has to constantly be in overdrive clearing out an onslaught of sugar. I imagine my body as a fire, if it's burning too much all at once, it'll go out faster. Better to burn slow for longer. Thus I have said my goodbyes to distance running, and I do not miss it at all. I used to practice an eat-a-lot, workout-a-lot cycle due to my love of eating and my desire to be able to eat more and not gain weight. I still love eating, but I accept that eating 5 times a day isn't what I was designed to do. Now I wait til I'm hungry to eat again, and I savor every bite. As opposed to "I really want to eat some cake, therefore I'll run 5 miles then eat it and that makes it okay"

          Remember, when all's said and done, low metabolism = VERY good thing, if you're Grok.
          Last edited by 2ndChance; 09-27-2012, 05:01 PM.

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          • #6
            Primal Wisdom: Diet Effects on Blood Coagulation

            I've read a bit on it form various areas, found this as a sort of summary of where I am going with this. I am not trying to bring down primal eating btw, I have found for myself starch and grains don't treat me well in moderate or large amounts. Fruit and veg I do great with. But I wonder about fat and its other effects. Surprised I haven't found anything by Robb Wolf on this yet, as he used to be a lipid metabolism researcher.

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            • #7
              So coagulation isn't a problem? Doesn't decrease circulation in a negative way?

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              • #8
                Fat is present in blood as triglycerides. These are higher on a high carb diet than a high fat diet. Triglycerides are a better marker of disease than is LDL
                Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Northrun View Post
                  Primal Wisdom: Diet Effects on Blood Coagulation

                  I've read a bit on it form various areas, found this as a sort of summary of where I am going with this.
                  That link looed very interesting. Then I read a bunch more posts and now I don't think that blog is a credible source.
                  Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                  Griff's cholesterol primer
                  5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                  Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                  TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                  bloodorchid is always right

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Northrun View Post
                    Primal Wisdom: Diet Effects on Blood Coagulation

                    I've read a bit on it form various areas, found this as a sort of summary of where I am going with this. I am not trying to bring down primal eating btw, I have found for myself starch and grains don't treat me well in moderate or large amounts. Fruit and veg I do great with. But I wonder about fat and its other effects. Surprised I haven't found anything by Robb Wolf on this yet, as he used to be a lipid metabolism researcher.
                    I only browsed that article, but it did not seem to say whether the research was based on subjects eating a high fat/high carb diet or a high fat/low carb one. The difference in triglycerides circulating in the blood stream will be worlds apart, depending on your carb intake.

                    If you eat high carb, high fat intake is a bad deal, if you eat low carb, it is a completely different scenario, your body burns the dietary fat as fuel when glycogen is depleted. Was listening to a podcast with Jeff Volek today, and he reiterates that blood triglyceride levels were much lower for high fat/low carb eaters compared to high carb/high fat eaters.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Northrun View Post
                      Insulin increases the uptake of glucose into the cells of the body...
                      But fat travels in the blood stream, it's part of it's digestion, and when you eat fat, it is in your blood stream. I am not saying that's a bad thing, I just wonder how it affects the metabolism of glucose, and circulation and whatnot, because some doctors claim it dos so in a negative way.

                      Each villus contains blood capillaries and small lymphatic vessels called lacteals. Glucose and amino acids move through the epithelial cells and into the blood capillaries, and travels via the hepatic portal vein to the liver for processing. Fatty acids and glycerol are packaged by epithelial cells and moved into lacteals. The lymphatic vessels later dump them into the bloodstream.
                      Are you talking about a recent study linking high fat diets to diabetes? Read this.
                      Does a High-Fat Diet Cause Type 2 Diabetes? | Mark&#039;s Daily Apple
                      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                      • #12
                        No I was reffering to Dr. Swank's study that observed after a high fat meal the blood reacted in a certain way. He was a doc studying MS many years ago.

                        Diet and Multiple Sclerosis: John A. McDougall, M.D. (about the 30 mins into this he shows some blood slides. The slides are of hamsters, but they did it on humans also.)

                        But yes, perhaps it was referring to the amount of free fatty acids in the blood stream? Is this the same as triglycerides? Then I was suppose it becomes an argument of what triggers that mechanism. The way he talked about it made it seem like fat ingestion had this effect on the blood no matter what. Ah, complexities of science.

                        So free fatty acids in the blood inhibit glucose absorption, but that doesn't necessarily happen by eating fat, more so excessive amounts of refined sugars and vegetable oils? That seems like what it's coming to.
                        Last edited by Northrun; 09-29-2012, 01:17 PM.

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