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Leafy Greens and Oxalates?

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  • Leafy Greens and Oxalates?

    Does anyone have any recommendations or suggested reading about oxalates? I've been into drinking a green drink daily, and would like to increase that to 2 or 3 drinks. Can you over do leafy greens? I've never had kidney stones, just one infection pre-primal. Family members haven't been so lucky, I hope I'm not prone to them. I feel great drinking veggies and would hate to give them up!

  • #2
    From what I understand, oxalates aren't a problem for most people, and the majority of the population can eat leafy greens with no problem at all. From a very unscientific standpoint (me), I've had zero trouble with kidney stones and I regularly eat 6-8 ounces of spinach a day.
    F 28/5'4/100 lbs

    "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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    • #3
      If I remember correctly, cooking greens helps with the oxalates. Maybe you could incorporate more that way?
      Happy Wifey and NEW MOM!
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      • #4
        Not all greens are high in oxalic acid. Some of the worst offenders are beet greens and kale. But dietary oxalic acid is poorly absorbed since the oxalic acid is pre-bound to minerals or binds with minerals in the digestive system blocking its absorption.

        Most oxalic acid kidney stones result from other sources such as the excess consumption of vitamin C, which breaks down in to oxalic acid in the blood. Generally though this only leads to kidney stones if there is pre-existing kidney disease.

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        • #5
          Hmm, interesting. I'll have to do some reading on vitamin c absorption. I take a supplement daily, but I guess it's probably not necessary if I'm eating/drinking fresh greens daily. I thought excess vitamin c was harmless because the body flushes it out, but it obviously goes through my kidneys so that makes sense. Cooking greens is an option, but I like blending them because it's quick and easy. Thanks for the input!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Columbia View Post
            Hmm, interesting. I'll have to do some reading on vitamin c absorption. I take a supplement daily, but I guess it's probably not necessary if I'm eating/drinking fresh greens daily. I thought excess vitamin c was harmless because the body flushes it out, but it obviously goes through my kidneys so that makes sense. Cooking greens is an option, but I like blending them because it's quick and easy. Thanks for the input!
            Excess vitamin C is not harmless. In high levels it becomes pro-oxidant instead of anti-oxidant. And the excess is not simply flushed out the kidneys. The synthetic vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is extremely unstable and is is rapidly broken down in to oxalic acid. Therefore, a small portion of the ingested vitamin C is utilized by the body and the remainder is broken down in to oxalic acid before being excreted through the kidneys.

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