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Ghee vs Butter?

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  • Ghee vs Butter?



    Ok, I'm gonna ask this, then I'm going to bed for real this time- lol.


    Can somebody (or several somebodies) give me the lowdown on ghee, and how it compares to just using regular butter? Pros & cons? I'm not at all familiar with ghee but it seems to be popular. Should I be using it instead of butter or doesn't it matter?


  • #2
    1



    +1 wondering about this too, especially because right now I'm using conventional butter, not grass fed or organic or anything like that.

    I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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    • #3
      1



      Ghee is clarified butter (butter oil).


      Basically unsalted butter without most of the lactose and other milk solids.


      You can make your own by gently heating unsalted butter until it becomes a clear golden liquid and then separating from the coagulated milk solids.


      Ghee is much safer for consumption as most of the harmful elements from the milk are removed.


      It's still a poor substitution for rendered animal fat though (lard and tallow are easy to make at home). Why try and turn milk into pure fat, when you can start with pure fat?

      The "Seven Deadly Sins"

      Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
      Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
      Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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      • #4
        1



        I've always thought that Ghee was just clarified butter (i.e melt the butter down, let it set and then scrape off the milk solids that settle on the surface. The clear stuff you have left is the ghee). I think the advantage of it is that you can heat it to a higher temperature because there are no milk solids to burn.


        Not sure if there are any nutritional benefits.......?

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        • #5
          1



          Ghee also doesn't go rancid for a very long time (handy in tropical climates like India where it originated).

          Yes- Ghee does not have casein (the milk protein that dairy sensitive people react to).

          http://www.prettyinprimal.blogspot.com

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          • #6
            1



            The only reason I like ghee more than tallow is because of the rich, intense buttery taste/smell. When you clarify the butter it gets much more flavorful IMO.

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            • #7
              1



              Ghee is just the milk fat.

              Butter is more than that.

              So there will be some good factors and some bad factors.


              If you are intolerant to milk, then the bad factors matter to you, otherwise not. Ghee may not be Paleo, but there are no downsides to it.


              If you want to cook at high temperatures, ghee is better as it does not have any moisture or other impurities that will prevent it to reach high temperatures. Ghee is a great medium for frying.


              If you want to cook at low temperatures and you don't care about the bad parts then butter will be better.


              In India we use ghee because it can stay for years without going bad even after facing several scorching summers. It was used to create fried breads which would not go bad for several days. Ideal for travelling. People used to carry those breads and pickles, on long journeys.


              In summary Ghee is good for everybody, and is very versatile. Butter is not.

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              • #8
                1



                I had always wondered this too, especially since for me Ghee is around double the price of the all natural unsalted butter I buy. After reading Anand's post I think I will have to give ghee a try; it's just a shame that I cut butter out for a while as of yesterday haha

                My whole life, I've felt like an animal......but I've ignored my instincts. I ignored what I really am. That will never happen again.

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                • #9
                  1



                  Thanks for the clarification. I'm cutting dairy for April so I won't be using either ghee or butter, but I think after the month is over I might try to add ghee back in to my diet. I do love the taste of butter.


                  I render and use tallow & lard for the majority of my cooking, but when it comes to veggies, there's nothing like butter. Except maybe ghee- lol.

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                  • #10
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                    "Thanks for the clarification"


                    was this pun intentional

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                    • #11
                      1



                      The other benefit is that if you buy ghee (or make it) from butter that comes from milk from pastured cows, you get some of the benefits of the CLA-enriched butterfat year-round-----even if it happens to be off-season.


                      I buy my ghee from a company called Pure Indian Foods (pureindianfoods.com). Their ghee is only made from spring and fall organic pastured milk----which means I can get those benefits year-round, when the cows in my Northeast region aren't eating growing green grass. But I can use ghee made from this milk through the winter, which is a benefit.


                      Sooze

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                      • #12
                        1



                        There is also a vegetarian ghee which wouldn't be very healthy.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          LOL@Shazkar!


                          Since you've already got the lowdown on the casein and lactose parts of butter vs. ghee, I'm not going to comment on that. Taste-wise, IMHO, nothing can beat ghee, not even CO. I have tallow and lard (bacon grease actually) at home. While I like lard, I find the taste of tallow over-powering.


                          If you decide to make ghee at home, the procedure is really, really simple. Buy pastured butter (I like KerryGold Irish butter); heat it at medium-low in a heavy-bottom sauce pan. Initially, it'll melt and then it'll start gurgling - that's just the water content evaporating. Turn of the heat when the gurgling completely stops, at this point you'll see the solids separated and formed into a white layer at the top. Let it cool for a few minutes and strain it using a sieve and store in a glass jar at room temperature. If you want to make flavored ghee, you can add your choice of spice when making the ghee. I usually add 1 cardamom to 8 oz of butter which imparts just a hint of the amazing cardamom flavor. The whole procedure takes about 15-20 minutes.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            Does a sieve work better than cheese cloth? In the past I was just scooping the top layer off with a spoon after it cooled a bit but then there's that bottom layer that always leaves traces of milk fat, that's nearly impossible to fully avoid. I'm going to use the straining method next time. Thanks!

                            ZC - 100% Carnivore

                            I EAT VEGANS

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                            • #15
                              1



                              Greg, I've only used a sieve/tea-strainer. I would think the wastage would be minimal if you use a sieve, whereas a cheesecloth would absorb some of the ghee and some cheesecloths tend to have bigger/looser mesh that would let some of the solids pass through.

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