Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Grass fed, corn finished nutrition profile

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Grass fed, corn finished nutrition profile

    So I am getting a quarter of a cow that until recently I thought was going to be grass fed. However I just learned that, due to the drought like conditions we have experienced the animal will be grass raised, corn finished. I am wondering how this will impact the nutritional profile of the animal... am I getting any CLA? or is this thing just going to be a low nutrition corn ball.

  • #2
    The cow will still have nutrition but it will have less of the good stuff. You reserved a grass-finished cow which isn't cheap and they aren't delivering that. I would cancel the order.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would also cancel. Find the real thing.
      Crohn's, doing SCD

      Comment


      • #4
        Cancel and look for a 100% grass-fed and finished cow.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by awm8604 View Post
          Cancel and look for a 100% grass-fed and finished cow.

          Have fun with that. You are so divorced from the realities of our food supply that it is laughable. Why, one might ask, would a farmer committed to grass-fed animals corn-finish a beast? Hmmm---might it be that there is a drought and that grass doesn't grow without rain? One of the beauties of grain is that it can be stockpiled over a bumper year to the next. Hay, OTOH, loses nutrition as it sits.

          Second, are you aware of how most farmers "grain-finish" a steer? We don't lock the beast in a lot and feed it nothing but grain, though we may well confine them to prevent the total ruin of our pastures. We give them mainly hay, if it is too dry for grass, and once a day we dump out a few buckets of corn or such into a feeder and let them have at it.

          Welcome to reality. You like to live on pastured animals, but if it stays dry and the grass doesn't grow, you'll be paying $20 a pound for hamburger, if you can find it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by fuzzylogic View Post
            Have fun with that. You are so divorced from the realities of our food supply that it is laughable. Why, one might ask, would a farmer committed to grass-fed animals corn-finish a beast? Hmmm---might it be that there is a drought and that grass doesn't grow without rain? One of the beauties of grain is that it can be stockpiled over a bumper year to the next. Hay, OTOH, loses nutrition as it sits.

            Second, are you aware of how most farmers "grain-finish" a steer? We don't lock the beast in a lot and feed it nothing but grain, though we may well confine them to prevent the total ruin of our pastures. We give them mainly hay, if it is too dry for grass, and once a day we dump out a few buckets of corn or such into a feeder and let them have at it.

            Welcome to reality. You like to live on pastured animals, but if it stays dry and the grass doesn't grow, you'll be paying $20 a pound for hamburger, if you can find it.
            Totally agreed, by the time you locate exactly what you are looking for, what are you going to be consuming and how much will you pay?
            As said, be realistic, go ahead, eat the corn cow and be thankfull it wasn't raised on SOY meal.
            But still keep looking for a reliable source of fully pastured beef for the next lot.
            "There are no short cuts to enlightenment, the journey is the destination, you have to walk this path alone"

            Comment


            • #7
              The farmers are doing all they can. There is a drought. Give the guy a chance. We put the farmers out of business and then what are we going to eat?
              You know all those things you wanted to do: You should go do them.

              Age 48
              height 5'3
              SW 215 lbs
              CW 180 lbs (whole foods/primal eating)
              LW 172 lbs
              GW 125ish lbs

              Comment


              • #8
                I think it's good that the farmer was honest. That tells you that you can trust him.

                IMO, a lot (if not all) "grass-fed" farmers supplement their feed with stuff like Wheat, corn, and Soy. I think it's obviously much, much less than we get from industrial mill farmers, but the fact is that farmers are just humans. They can't create rain, no matter how badly they might want.

                In drought conditions, such as this year, they very likely needed to supplement their feed. Just because your grass-fed supplier doesn't tell you that, doesn't mean he didn't. I buy grass-fed well knowing that it wasn't truly 100% grass fed and I'm okay with that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The farmer I am using explained to me his reasing for using the grain/corn feed that he uses occasionally:

                  1) He said it is helpful to get the cows exposed to grains because they view it as a treat. If the cows escape their fenced off area, all the farmer has to do is shake the grain bucket at them and they come a running back to get the treat!

                  2) In lean times (droughts), and during the winter, he supplements with grains if and when they run out of hay. Harder winters require it where I live (Western New York).

                  Seems like it made sense to me, and he said the grains end up about 10-15% of their total diet for the life of the animal.
                  Last edited by stoney56; 09-06-2012, 05:27 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you everyone, I am leaning towards still buying my share, as a couple people mentioned, at least he was honest with me.
                    I would like to think that as long as the animal is still getting hay or grass with the supplemented corn diet at the end of a pasture based life there will be enough of the "good stuff" in the animal to justify the purchase. There are other benefits too, it is a local animal, and overall, it will be much cheaper than even the grass fed-corn finished beef at my local co-op.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      30 Days may not be such a big deal.

                      Some people prefer grain-finished flavor.

                      Our farmers locally who raise 100% grass-fed have not had the severe drought problems and are able to finish on grass, so I think attacking someone as being divorced from reality is sort of uncalled for - depends on conditions in the area and the farmer's methodology. Since the OP's area is drought-stricken, I think the decision to proceed with the purchase is sound, given the facts at hand.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In your original post, you said the cow was going to be corn-finished. Is it just a week or two or is it 3 months? Will the cow still be on pasture or kept confined and only have access to corn? Finished is a big difference than supplemented when it comes to health and nutrition.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If the cow is raised in a fairly "natural" way, don't sweat the difference between grain and grass fed/finished/supplemented.

                          Grok, after all, ate all kinds of semi-rancid meat that had to be practically charcoaled into palatability.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Finnegan, thank you for that link, that was just the type of info I was looking for!!!! I feel a lot better as this animal will see no more than a month, but I'm surmising around a couple weeks of a corn supplemented diet. Looks like there will be plenty of omegas left, especially as it will still be getting some natural forage.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I am already giving my sheep and goats hay due to the drought. I feed them alfalfa pellets in their automatic feeders though. It's better this year though--last year I had to start throwing hay in early August. We are getting 2 steers to raise in Oct. We will slaughter them in March or so. They will just get hay. No grass grows in the winter.
                              http://www.cantneverdidanything.net/

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X