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EAT MOAR FAT! I'm finally GETTING it.

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  • That on-line recipe seemed to have a lot of garlic; 1 cup (136g) for the whole recipe, that's 45g of carbs.

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    • Originally posted by Zanna View Post
      I am surprised the carb count is so high. There is no sugar and I strain any vegetables used for flavor out before jarring.
      This was your recipe? Thanks for having the analysis available!

      Originally posted by Goldie View Post
      That on-line recipe seemed to have a lot of garlic; 1 cup (136g) for the whole recipe, that's 45g of carbs.
      Ahhhhh, I wasn't thinking about that, and my bone broth doesn't normally have garlic or other things. I add that sort of thing later depending on what I am using the broth for. Since my bone broth doesn't have veggies until after the fact, I think I will remove the carbs from my calculations for tracking purposes. It is just bone, water, and vinegar plus whatever residual connective tissues or meat that may still be on the soup or chicken bones.

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      • I checked a number of entries for various beef broths on my "Lose It" app and they have little or no carbs. Even the entry for vegetable beef broth shows one cup at 80 calories with 1.9 grams fat, 12.9 carbs, and 2.9 protein.

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        • Originally posted by Miss Understood View Post
          I checked a number of entries for various beef broths on my "Lose It" app and they have little or no carbs. Even the entry for vegetable beef broth shows one cup at 80 calories with 1.9 grams fat, 12.9 carbs, and 2.9 protein.

          True, but the entries in the Lose It database appear to all be all commercial...I think the link provided earlier was from a sample that was sent in an analyzed, though I could be mistaken. The carbs are likely explained by the large amount of garlic

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          • Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
            I wish there were transcripts as I hate listening to podcasts with a passion. But basically the takeaway message is:
            - If you are female, especially if you are female and old, low carb works for weight loss because the appetite control helps you eat less.
            - If you want to lose weight, you have to eat less.
            - Count calories, get a food scale and weigh and measure everything. You will be very surprised how small a serving actually is.
            - If you are old, you can't eat nearly as much food as a young person can.
            - If you want to lose that last 20lbs you may have to live the rest of your life on a strict diet and endure a lot of hunger.
            - There are many people for whom weight loss beyond a certain point is not possible. Those people should revise their goals to something more realistic.
            - There actually are other metabolic things going on for a lot of people. Sometimes you need to see a doctor and yes, it's hard to find one who can truly help you.
            - Also there is a lot that researchers simply do not know yet about metabolism. It may be that nobody can help you yet.
            - If you lost a bunch of weight and kept it off, that's a huge victory. You are already in the top 2% or something of people who've lost weight if you've been able to keep it off for 6 months or a year. Enjoy that success. It's actually a huge success.
            - Or maybe your success is you've gotten off all your meds, fixed your diabetes, can do things you couldn't do before. That's also huge.
            - Most people have unrealistic ideas of success and that is usually encouraged by all diet books (including Mark's) otherwise they would not be able to sell the books (or probably get them published.)
            - The dirty little secret nobody ever tells you is that your metabolism actually slows down with exercise (from 5% to 15% slow down).
            - You never burn off as many calories as you think with exercise.

            Long story short: Calories matter.
            sbhikes, thank you so much for posting the podcast.

            I didnt wait to read the thread, went straight away to listen and only later discovered you had kindly posted details.
            I got through half of the second one though, very interesting.
            thanks goodness we can talk about calories sensibly, there has been so much misinformation and peoples loudly voiced opinions about this over the years.

            I am particularly interested in the exercise as well. All I am doing currently is some weights and that suits me well

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            • That recipe wasn't mine - I was just surprised that it had that many carbs, though I guess that is a lot of garlic. I use about about a head, chopped onion and carrot, but it's all strained out at the end.

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              • Originally posted by Catrin View Post
                I've become addicted to bone broth. I am still tracking my diet until all of this is more of a habit and I am comfortable that I am getting the micro/macro nutrients I think I am. I know that each batch of bone broth is going to have a different profile because there really isn't a way to standardize it. I've been stumped on how to treat my bone broth when I track it, and for lack of any other input, I've decided to treat 1-2 cups of bone broth as 1 tablespoon of lard. Does this sound unreasonable? Too high, too low? Just wondering how others have chosen to treat bone broth.

                Another reason I still track is to make certain I don't over-eat in calories. What makes up those calories is of course more important, but if I get too many calories then I can't lose those remaining 5-6 pounds...and I am very active so I also can't afford to have my body start storing everything as fat again because it thinks I am trying to starve it. Been there, done that, and bought the t-shirt...
                Originally posted by NourishedEm View Post
                Here you go.
                Originally posted by Zanna View Post
                That recipe wasn't mine - I was just surprised that it had that many carbs, though I guess that is a lot of garlic. I use about about a head, chopped onion and carrot, but it's all strained out at the end.
                By the time you strain out the carrot, garlic, and onion, all their sugars are in the broth. The only thing being strained out is residual cellulose.

                Every batch of bone broth is different. This is a really hard thing to quantify. It varies based on how long you leave the bones to simmer, how much marrow there was in the bones, how much meat on the bones, etc. Protein, fat, carbs, and calories can all vary.

                That doesn't mean you shouldn't drink it, just be aware that there may be a lot of calories packed in that one cup of yumminess.

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                • I usually make my bone broth (~ 4-5 L of final product) with 1/2 of a medium onion and a lot of celery + spices and one clove of garlic. I dunno, I don't feel like agonizing over it too too much. I figure my overall carb count is so low, that if a cup of broth has 10 g of carbs, not 5, I can take the hit.

                  And now I am craving rice with soy sauce, in addition to an apple. I am wondering if I am reaching the limit of my no carb up ability. We'll see. One week at a time.
                  My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                  When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                  • Originally posted by Leida View Post
                    I usually make my bone broth (~ 4-5 L of final product) with 1/2 of a medium onion and a lot of celery + spices and one clove of garlic. I dunno, I don't feel like agonizing over it too too much. I figure my overall carb count is so low, that if a cup of broth has 10 g of carbs, not 5, I can take the hit.

                    And now I am craving rice with soy sauce, in addition to an apple. I am wondering if I am reaching the limit of my no carb up ability. We'll see. One week at a time.
                    That's a sensible attitude.

                    My next culinary experiment in the world of high fat is in process, Pemmican made from venison and rendered bone marrow. Has anyone tried rendering the marrow? Does it melt well? I know the fat left in the pan after roasting bones is a wonderfully clear pure tasting fat that works really well for cooking.

                    So the venison is in the dehydrator and bones are defrosting. I will report back how it goes.

                    I am trying to clear some space in my freezer for my lamb which I will pick up the first Saturday of October. Venison and bones were taking up too much room. Pemmican doesn't need refrigeration.

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                    • My next culinary experiment in the world of high fat is in process, Pemmican made from venison and rendered bone marrow.
                      are you dehydrating the venison, rendering the bone marrow and then grinding them all up together to make pemmican? sounds so yummy. i've never render fat from marrow but i always render fat from any game animals which come my way. rendered venison fat is very tasty. i'm actually still a bit squicky about marrow for some reason. from the woman who will eat raw kina lol mum used to take it out of the cold bones with a knife and eat it on bread and butter which is prob why i dont like the thought. i would love to make some pemican as we are heading into tramping season but am not sure how to grind it up. will a blender do it or do you need something like a food processor?

                      Continuing my experiment. it occured to me. a good reason to cut calories instead of just eating to get used to it. i reckon with all that fat, your body has quite a digestion load going on which will take alot of energy. everyone i know with chronic fatigue has a toasted gut. so maybe, if we eat too much fat in our adaptation phase, that helps contribute to the feeling of exhaustion?

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                      • Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                        That's a sensible attitude.

                        My next culinary experiment in the world of high fat is in process, Pemmican made from venison and rendered bone marrow. Has anyone tried rendering the marrow? Does it melt well? I know the fat left in the pan after roasting bones is a wonderfully clear pure tasting fat that works really well for cooking.

                        So the venison is in the dehydrator and bones are defrosting. I will report back how it goes.

                        I am trying to clear some space in my freezer for my lamb which I will pick up the first Saturday of October. Venison and bones were taking up too much room. Pemmican doesn't need refrigeration.
                        I have rendered beef marrow before, it's a beautiful fat to use, similar to tallow but softer, due no doubt to the higher concentration of monounsaturates in bone marrow. You may need to keep your pemmican in the fridge, depending on how soft your finished product is.
                        My Journal

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                        • I've only made pemmican with beef tallow which I purchased from US Wellness meats. I dried my meat as much as possible and used my ordinary glass blender to grind it, doing so in small batches. I did not put salt in it. I did not like the taste without salt. So I melted it all back up and added more tallow and salt. It still wasn't salty enough for me. I would add even more next time. Also, the meat was crunchy which I did not like. I let it sit unrefrigerated for several months and that softened it up a little better, let the fat penetrate a little better into the meat.

                          I really liked using the pemmican on a backpacking trip melted into a pot of home-dehydrated sweet potatoes and other veggies. I liked it so much, I thought perhaps the beef is not necessary and maybe I could just bring hockey pucks of beef tallow with shredded coconut, and separately bring other meats, such as dehydrated cooked pork tenderloin. Then I could really make some tasty beef tallow coconut curry dishes on my next trip. I licked the spoons from making the coconut pemmican and it was pretty good, actually. I keep meaning to see if I can eat a whole hockey puck of coconut pemmican by itself.
                          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                          • coconut pemmican
                            that would just be dessicated coconut in tallow? i have a love of biltong as well but it is very hard to get here. other than high end snack food for big $s. so that is something else i need to work out how to make as you can just take a hunk of that tramping.

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                            • This guy seems to have "written the book" on pemmican making.

                              http://www.traditionaltx.us/images/PEMMICAN.pdf

                              I'm going by his recommendations for drying the meat except doing it in a dehydrator (less messy). But he is very insistent about doing it at a lower temperature so as to DRY the meat not COOK it. He says the taste, texture, and nutrition are all better if it is just dried.

                              I'm roasting the bones so I can extract the marrow. Then he says you can either do the stove top rendering method which requires a lot of stirring, or just put it in a baking dish in the oven for about a day on a low heat. That sounds easier.

                              Some pemmican purists don't like to add spices but I have every intention of spicing these up. Not sure with what yet but I'll work that out.

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                              • I have made yet another attempt at de-baconizing our pork order! I have been seeing Pork Belly on food TV for 2 days in a row, and, boy, I think I can cook it even if I don't cure it into Russian salo (frozen bacon made with just salt, spice and garlic). Russian, or Chinese, I am keeping fingers crossed to win against the wily butchers and farmers who keep curing our meat! Kindda funny when everyone is panicking about the bacon shortage.

                                I hit amazing 78% from fat yesterday. Alas, I also hit almost 1700 calories, so the weight is still holding. I think though, if I get maintenance this week, it is actually a good thing. But, will try fat fast to cheescake baking time, hoping to keep calories under 1,300 today. Only have time for walking, no gym.

                                Oh, in GREAT news about gym - no exaggerated soreness today, pretty pleased. Maybe excess calories helped?
                                My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                                When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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