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Aren't we ALL fat-burners and sugar-burners? What's the difference?

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  • #46
    Just had a look at the Methylation article, then thought what's the interest in CFS?
    I assume this is the non specific fatigue/low energy when you were in the low carb range, yet you put on weight, you mentioned back somewhere not pulling same weights in gym etc, yet when you threw some sugar at it you immediately got over those hurdles.
    The first thing I noticed when I opened the methylation page was Acetyl L Carnitine & CoQ10, thats when it clicked where you were going, both of these two are an essential part of the fat metabolism pathway, one is the Fatty acid transporter(CoQ10 I think) in the blood, the other transports the Fatty acids across the mitochondrial membrane, so if you are lacking in either of them then this would be a definate roadblock to Fat metabolism.
    I know of a number of individuals with undefined fatigue issues that immediately improved by supplementing these two, now it isn't a fix for everyone, most of the time the response is almost immediate, generally, if they are going to show a result it will be within a week.
    The normal dosage I have seen used was around CoQ10 at 150mg/day and Carnitine between 2,000-4,000mg per day.
    Have a bit of a search on them, most descriptions indicate the same types of benefits/improvements regarding fatigue, brain fog etc.
    If you decide to go back to low carb at any point and hit the same type of wall, may be worth a try to see if supplementation can alleviate symptoms, this may give you some insight as to where the issues lie.
    "There are no short cuts to enlightenment, the journey is the destination, you have to walk this path alone"

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Omni View Post
      Just had a look at the Methylation article, then thought what's the interest in CFS?
      I assume this is the non specific fatigue/low energy when you were in the low carb range, yet you put on weight, you mentioned back somewhere not pulling same weights in gym etc, yet when you threw some sugar at it you immediately got over those hurdles.
      The first thing I noticed when I opened the methylation page was Acetyl L Carnitine & CoQ10, thats when it clicked where you were going, both of these two are an essential part of the fat metabolism pathway, one is the Fatty acid transporter(CoQ10 I think) in the blood, the other transports the Fatty acids across the mitochondrial membrane, so if you are lacking in either of them then this would be a definate roadblock to Fat metabolism.
      I know of a number of individuals with undefined fatigue issues that immediately improved by supplementing these two, now it isn't a fix for everyone, most of the time the response is almost immediate, generally, if they are going to show a result it will be within a week.
      The normal dosage I have seen used was around CoQ10 at 150mg/day and Carnitine between 2,000-4,000mg per day.
      Have a bit of a search on them, most descriptions indicate the same types of benefits/improvements regarding fatigue, brain fog etc.
      If you decide to go back to low carb at any point and hit the same type of wall, may be worth a try to see if supplementation can alleviate symptoms, this may give you some insight as to where the issues lie.

      My interest in CFS is mainly due to having severe fatigue that fits a CFS diagnosis. However, the moment I tell a doctor that I'm diagnosed with MS (even though I've have no flares or new lesions in 2 years), they automatically tell me that any issue I have is due to the MS and basically I just have to suck it up.

      I'm not willing to accept this, because this is what both gastroenterologists told me when I was suffering from IBS-C; it was likely due to my MS and I'd just have to live with it. Instead of accepting that, I kept researching, and eventually I was able to heal myself, stop the IBS flares and get control of the constipation by using information from Fiber Menace - low fiber diet, probiotics, L-glutamine supplements, and Hydro-C.

      A while back, I did try all those supplements listed in the articles - D-Ribose, CoQ10, L-Acetyl-Carnitine,etc... but they had zero effect on my fatigue. But the reason that I started to have the suspicion that my body just isn't efficiently accessing energy from fat came from several experiences:

      1) 16-24 hour fasts were no problem hunger level wise, but any time i attempted to go longer than 24 hours, my vital signs dropped way too low. BP went down to 85/55, pulse was in the 40s. It seemed like my body was shutting down, rather than accessing some of the extra fat I clearly had in storage. Consuming electrolytes and bone broth and coconut oil had zero effect on BP and pulse. The moment I had some sugar in the form of fruit or honey, everything normalized fairly quickly.

      2) I really enjoyed the freedom that low carb (75-125g) gave me in terms of hunger, and for a while, I felt great. But after about 6ish months, I noticed that my mood was significantly worse; everything seemed dark and I was prone to depression. I assumed this was typical winter Seasonal Affective stuff, and that it would pass, but come summer I was no better. I was trying a variety of amino acid supplements, Sam-e, etc...which had temporary improvements on mood but nothing long term.

      Now that I've been eating high carb/high sugar, I feel like a different person; I see the positive side of everything, I laugh all the time, problems that would have previous sent me into a pit of despair just roll right off. So far, there don't seem to be highs and lows, just an overall sense of well-being and happiness. (I'm only about a month into this experiment, so I don't know if these changes will be lasting.)

      3) The issue you brought up about lack of improvement at the gym. For close to a year, I was moaking no progress, still using almost all the same starting weights. Upon reintroducing carbs, I started putting on muscle and gaining strength like crazy; with carbs I made more progress in 2 months of weightlifting than in a whole year of eating low carb. I understand that some people pack on muscle without any carbs, but it just never worked for me.

      The thing is, I really like the philosophy behind low carb, and I think it can be a very valuable way of eating for people (like myself) who need to get control of hunger, or help normalize blood sugar, etc... but I'm seeing that for myself, at least, now that I have a healthy relationship with food, and I'm not prone to binges or food obsession anymore, eating low carb just isn't serving my needs.

      So, if we are all both sugar-burners and fat-burners at various points throughout the day, maybe eating more sugar and less fat isn't necessarily a bad thing for some people, because it doesn't mean that the fat-burning will screach to a halt.

      I'm interested to see where this experiment leads me...it's possible that I need some form of fat/carb seasonal cycling, which may ultimately be the answer for me. In the colder weather, more fats less sugars; in the warmer months less fat more sugars. Time will tell.
      Last edited by BestBetter; 08-29-2012, 03:36 AM.

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      • #48
        Ok, got it.
        You've been through many stages on this path, covered all the obvious things.
        Just getting back to fundamentals, I still feel that fat metabolism should be the primary energy source, because excess glucose is always converted to fat anyway, then used in that form.
        But for you for whatever reason some part of the cycle is not kicking in, you obviously did it for quite a while and although you got by, with both the physical & mental/emotional symptoms indicating that things weren't as good as they could have been, and this carb experiment has given you an insight to where you can be.
        I think the carb cycling you mentioned is a good idea because it will keep that fat side tuned, but it will also allow you to test for any improvements in that aspect.
        Having heard that much of your story, and I imagine there is probably more, it is highly likely your body was going downhill for quite a while before you actually became aware of it, this is likely the case for most everyone, even the apparantly healthy ones and Mark himself has mentioned at times how his old "war wounds" flare on occassion, so your healing will probably also take a significant time.
        For myself I feel that after 3-4 years of this diet/lifestyle I will start to get an appreciation of how I am supposed to feel, this being about the time it takes to cycle out the excess polyunsaturated oils and clear some of the other toxins from my own body.
        If you have significant repair work needed, then it will take a significant time, from the other groups I am also on, mainly thyroid & MS, there seems to be a majority view that places gastrointestinal health at the centre of most autoimmune manifestations and you are already attending to that and I'm sure you've already read similar things anyway.
        Wish I could have been of more help,
        Funny thing is I joined up here expecting to interact with a bunch of really healthy individuals, after my autoimmune forum discussions, but gradually I began to understand most people come here because they feel that there is an issue with their health and are looking for ways to improve it, my self included.
        "There are no short cuts to enlightenment, the journey is the destination, you have to walk this path alone"

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