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  • Wok seasoning

    I have a hammered steel wok. I season it with sunflower oil. But when I cook in it with lemon or lime juice, I find that a lot of the seasoning comes off and exposes the naked steel. Presumably all this oxidised oil has gone into my food. Is this a problem? Am I doing it wrong somehow?

  • #2
    I've never seasoned a wok, but it seems very similar to how you treat a cast iron skillet.
    When Cheaper is Better: How to Season a Wok | The Paupered Chef
    Depression Lies

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    • #3
      after cooking, take the food out of the wok and squirt the citrus on it then.

      are you sure you didn't buy a pre-seasoned wok?
      As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

      Ernest Hemingway

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      • #4
        Originally posted by namelesswonder View Post
        I've never seasoned a wok, but it seems very similar to how you treat a cast iron skillet.
        When Cheaper is Better: How to Season a Wok | The Paupered Chef
        Yes, that's what I do. But I seem to need to redo it pretty frequently.

        Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
        after cooking, take the food out of the wok and squirt the citrus on it then.
        Whether that is appropriate depends on what I'm cooking. Sometimes you want to cook the food in the lemon juice.

        are you sure you didn't buy a pre-seasoned wok?
        Yes. They don't exist here.

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        • #5
          I think with cast-iron, the seasoning comes off when it has been applied too thickly. Maybe try the method outlined here:
          Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To

          So heat the wok slightly, oil the wok, then wipe it until it seems there is no more oil. Then heat the bejeebies out of it. Let it cool, then repeat several more times.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
            I think with cast-iron, the seasoning comes off when it has been applied too thickly. Maybe try the method outlined here:
            Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To

            So heat the wok slightly, oil the wok, then wipe it until it seems there is no more oil. Then heat the bejeebies out of it. Let it cool, then repeat several more times.
            Perfect, just what I was looking for! Thanks!

            I definitely have been putting it on too thickly. Do I need to scour it all off before trying again, or can I just season on top of it?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by orielwen View Post
              Perfect, just what I was looking for! Thanks!

              I definitely have been putting it on too thickly. Do I need to scour it all off before trying again, or can I just season on top of it?
              I think if you tried to season on top of it, the new seasoning would stick to the old, so it could still all come off. Also, I've never tried the seasoning instructions above on steel, so I don't know if the results would be different or not.

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