Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

gut healing powder/supplement?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Patski, have you experimented with higher doses of magnesium? I seem to tolerate quite high levels, now if I get cramps, I will take 1000mg and it kicks in in about an hour, and that only happens now if I am particularly naughty or lazy the preceding month.

    James, still in the digestive system but a little lower, is there a way to strengthen the walls of the colon, in particular to prevent fissures?
    Life. Be in it.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by patski View Post
      James, I forgot to add: I take digestive enzymes when I remember to. Sometimes they help with indigestion/burning stomach/burping...but sometimes they don't. I've tried HCI before too, and it made it worse.
      I don't recommend digestive enzyme supplements. They can cause the body's own production of enzymes to decrease for one. And if they contain cellulase and hemicellulase they will digest the fibers the flora need for food and increase the blood sugar in the process.

      If the betaine HCl made things worse you likely have gastritis.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by patski View Post
        James,

        I may look into those herbs anyway. I just have to source them, which may be a royal pain in the arse. I do drink licorice root tea. I'm actually brewing a cup right now.
        You can make a tea, but to make the tea the root is best rapidly boiled for 15-20 minutes. I generally use the powder instead.

        Originally posted by patski View Post
        I do my best to buy grass-fed beef to avoid high O6 levels. I do eat wild salmon as much as possible these days.
        Make sure to get it from trusted sources. Some places are dying farm raised salmon pink to make it appear as wild caught.

        Originally posted by patski View Post
        Done cramp bark. Didn't work.
        Have you been checked for possible endometriosis? This could cause severe cramping.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by patski View Post
          James,

          Would a tincture of each work?
          I prefer the powders since they retain the flora that feed the flora for a healthy intestinal tract and not everything gets extracted in tinctures.

          I also avoid tinctures for other reasons as well such as poor stability with many herbs. There is a myth that tinctures last indefinitely. Studies have shown though that the active components in many herbal tinctures are destroyed within 3 months.

          Comment


          • #35
            [QUOTE=Iron Will;929973]
            Originally posted by JamesS View Post
            I actually work with a variety of "alternative" medicines, but herbs are one of the primary things I work with. I design formulas, and teach classes on dealing with health holistically as well as take people on herb walks in our local deserts and mountains to show people what they can eat and use for medicine. I was in allopathic medicine for 13 years but left due to the massive corruption and simply the fact that most of the medical system knows virtually nothing about medicine.QUOTE]

            JamesS thanks for all the information that you have posted. It's actually brought up a couple more questions. First off, I have a female client in her early 40's that is looking for a supplement that would help with her cramps. She starts getting her cramps about a week prior to her actual period. I've already suggested Maca and Magnesium Taurate but I'm not sure what else to suggest. Can you make some suggestions that I can pass along?

            For my second question, can you suggest some good reading or online courses that I might be able to take to increase my knowledge? This stuff is like brain candy for me!
            For the cramps magnesium is generally the best choice. But I prefer magnesium malate because it is well absorbed and does the best job of raising ATP.

            Otherwise, there are various smooth muscle relaxants. Cramp bark is probably the best known. Wild yam also works, but most of the diosgenin gets metabolized too quickly by the liver so I tend to avoid this one for cramps. The most effective herb I found is the silk tassel, but it is not easy to get since it has a very limited growth range. It is common in our mountains out here so I have collected it in the past. I used to give my friend capsules of the leaf, which is the weakest part of the plant for her severe cramps. One capsule would knock out her cramps for 8 hours or so. There are a few companies I have seen in the past that offer it in tincture and you may be able to find it online. Be warned though that it is some of the most bitter, nasty tasting herbs you will ever taste.

            Another herb that should help would be Gynostemma pentaphyllum (jiaogulan). It also helps relax smooth muscle. It also supports the adrenal glands, which reduces inflammation as well. Gynostemma also helps reduce inflammation due to its high sterol content, which also reduces cholesterol thereby reducing inflammatory prostaglandins.

            If the cramps do not respond to smooth muscle relaxants then they should be checked for other contributing factors such as endometriosis, tilted uterus, excessively narrow cervix, etc.

            As far as books to read I like the books written by Michael Murray. A good one to start with would be the Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine by Murray and Pizzorno:

            Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine, Revised Second Edition: Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno: 9780761511571: Amazon.com: Books

            I like his writing style. He gives a good explanation of the disease/condition with an explanation of his recommendations. All backed with journal references. But the information is broken down for those without medical backgrounds. Murray actually has a number of other books, particularly on specific topics such as diabetes and cancer.

            Here are links to my old Curezone forum and my current MedCapsules site, which has a lot of information for you to go through:

            The Truth in Medicine, Page 160, Explaining the myths and facts of alternative medicine:

            MEDCAPSULES.COM

            As far as online courses, no I do not know of any. And I don't recommend wasting money on an herb school. Many of the schools teach old school herbalism, which relies heavily on traditionally used herbs rather than what is safer or more effective. And I had a friend go through one of these courses. I was helping her with her homework and was finding mistakes on the tests the school was supplying. A better option is to take that $6,000 school will cost and build a really nice library instead with the money so you can learn anatomy and physiology and some basic chemistry to understand the actions of the herbs on the body and with each other.

            If you want to focus mainly on herbs I also recommend contacting the American Botanical Council and buy their packets of back issues of HerbalGram.

            Originally posted by Iron Will View Post
            Thanks. BTW another Canuck here.
            Pretty country up there. I had made a few trips up there years ago to do some lecturing over in B.C, and I taught a 2 day class (12 hours each day) on alternative medicine in Red Deer, AB.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by JamesS View Post
              I don't recommend digestive enzyme supplements. They can cause the body's own production of enzymes to decrease for one. And if they contain cellulase and hemicellulase they will digest the fibers the flora need for food and increase the blood sugar in the process.

              If the betaine HCl made things worse you likely have gastritis.
              AHA! That's what my naturopathic doc said too.

              What do I do to treat this? Smaller meals haven't helped.

              I'm going out to buy licorice root powder and yucca root powder today. Maybe they'll help with gastritis?

              James, you've been super helpful. Thanks!!!
              Last edited by patski; 08-17-2012, 06:51 AM.
              A Post-Primal PrimalPat

              Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

              Comment


              • #37
                [QUOTE=JamesS;930571]
                Originally posted by Iron Will View Post

                For the cramps magnesium is generally the best choice. But I prefer magnesium malate because it is well absorbed and does the best job of raising ATP.

                Otherwise, there are various smooth muscle relaxants. Cramp bark is probably the best known. Wild yam also works, but most of the diosgenin gets metabolized too quickly by the liver so I tend to avoid this one for cramps. The most effective herb I found is the silk tassel, but it is not easy to get since it has a very limited growth range. It is common in our mountains out here so I have collected it in the past. I used to give my friend capsules of the leaf, which is the weakest part of the plant for her severe cramps. One capsule would knock out her cramps for 8 hours or so. There are a few companies I have seen in the past that offer it in tincture and you may be able to find it online. Be warned though that it is some of the most bitter, nasty tasting herbs you will ever taste.

                Another herb that should help would be Gynostemma pentaphyllum (jiaogulan). It also helps relax smooth muscle. It also supports the adrenal glands, which reduces inflammation as well. Gynostemma also helps reduce inflammation due to its high sterol content, which also reduces cholesterol thereby reducing inflammatory prostaglandins.

                If the cramps do not respond to smooth muscle relaxants then they should be checked for other contributing factors such as endometriosis, tilted uterus, excessively narrow cervix, etc.

                As far as books to read I like the books written by Michael Murray. A good one to start with would be the Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine by Murray and Pizzorno:

                Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine, Revised Second Edition: Michael Murray, Joseph Pizzorno: 9780761511571: Amazon.com: Books

                I like his writing style. He gives a good explanation of the disease/condition with an explanation of his recommendations. All backed with journal references. But the information is broken down for those without medical backgrounds. Murray actually has a number of other books, particularly on specific topics such as diabetes and cancer.

                Here are links to my old Curezone forum and my current MedCapsules site, which has a lot of information for you to go through:

                The Truth in Medicine, Page 160, Explaining the myths and facts of alternative medicine:

                MEDCAPSULES.COM

                As far as online courses, no I do not know of any. And I don't recommend wasting money on an herb school. Many of the schools teach old school herbalism, which relies heavily on traditionally used herbs rather than what is safer or more effective. And I had a friend go through one of these courses. I was helping her with her homework and was finding mistakes on the tests the school was supplying. A better option is to take that $6,000 school will cost and build a really nice library instead with the money so you can learn anatomy and physiology and some basic chemistry to understand the actions of the herbs on the body and with each other.

                If you want to focus mainly on herbs I also recommend contacting the American Botanical Council and buy their packets of back issues of HerbalGram.



                Pretty country up there. I had made a few trips up there years ago to do some lecturing over in B.C, and I taught a 2 day class (12 hours each day) on alternative medicine in Red Deer, AB.
                JamesS thank you again for all the information that you've shared I'm sure that my head will be swimming in a few days with all the reading. I'm excited to start!

                I was wondering what your thoughts are on using Arginine as another supplement for cramping? I use Arginine as a way to increase training volume, recovery and GH. This is the first time I've actually made the connection with cramping. Thoughts?

                Comment


                • #38
                  James, powders have been purchased. How do I take this? Do I mix with water?
                  A Post-Primal PrimalPat

                  Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    can licorice root just be added to food to reap the benefits of hopefully making one who struggles with constipation have to go more regularly? i love the the taste of licorice and i pt anise seeds on everything. so if this could help me id give it a shot.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by namelesswonder View Post
                      Does cultured foods include things like yogurt? I'm confused because everything I'd read says to avoid fibrous foods while battling with an overgrowth, because it will just feed the candida.
                      Fibrous foods do not feed the Candida. Candida feeds on simple sugars, not long chain polysaccharides like fibers. The fibers are broken down by the flora instead in to smaller sugar units they feed on. The flora in turn produce acids that keep the Candida growth under control.

                      Originally posted by namelesswonder View Post
                      My gyn wants to treat it as just an infection and use boric acid suppositories. I'm hesitant to introduce anything directly like that, as it is an imbalance in the body, not just one location in the body, that is causing the pH to be off and the overgrowth to occur.
                      I agree.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by KerryK View Post
                        Thanks, I've been reading/hearing about methylation and I understand that it's greatly impaired in most elderly people.

                        I have notes to investigate trimethylglycine and methionine and with the above recommendation, I'll put it on the front burner. I just reordered Dr Ray Sahelian's Mind Power (a proprietary blend) for it seemed to work a little (for mental clarity) but the TMG is a relatively low dose in that blend, I believe.

                        Dad takes quite a few supplements and it's hard for me to make sure that he doesn't take too much of one particular ingredient since he does take a multi and a couple proprietary blends as well as single ingredient supplements. He's starting the Green Ice Fermented Cod Liver Oil & High Vitamin Butter blend on a few days... but now I'm trying to figure out how that might affect the multi-vitamin he takes. So much to consider and I don't want him taking too high a dose.

                        So back to TMG - do you have any data on dosage you could pass on?

                        Thank you
                        Here are some posts on methylation:

                        Methylation Equals Life

                        Comparing SAMe, choline, DMG and TMG

                        The relationship between methylation and stomach acid secretion

                        TMG is s a dose dependent substance. Therefore activity increases with dose. I recommend for most people though 1g (1,000mg) three times daily.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Belforte View Post
                          Patski, have you experimented with higher doses of magnesium? I seem to tolerate quite high levels, now if I get cramps, I will take 1000mg and it kicks in in about an hour, and that only happens now if I am particularly naughty or lazy the preceding month.
                          Want to add that the form of magnesium is also important. Most manufacturers use magnesium oxide because it is cheap. But it is also absorbed very poorly and when combined with water forms caustic and stomach acid neutralizing magnesium hydroxide.

                          I prefer magnesium malate because it is absorbed better and it does the best job of increasing ATP levels. The malic acid also has other benefits such as dissolving uric acid making it good for gout and uric acid kidney stones. Magnesium citrate is my second choice.

                          Originally posted by Belforte View Post
                          James, still in the digestive system but a little lower, is there a way to strengthen the walls of the colon, in particular to prevent fissures?
                          You would have to focus on rebuilding the collagen and elastin. These structural proteins require several amino acids that you can easily obtain from diet. Copper and zinc are catalysts only required in trace amounts so again can be obtained from diet. The main deficiency that people tend to develop that leads to a loss of collagen and elastin is silica, which the body absorbs and utilizes in the form of orthosilicic acid. The other common nutritional deficiency is vitamin C, which declines rapidly with the use of stimulants like caffeine or nicotine and stress.

                          Silica levels decline with age due to declining stomach acid levels. The use of antacids, acid blockers (proton pump inhibitors), supplements with calcium carbonate or magnesium oxide, alkaline waters and other alkalizers can make things worse.

                          We obtain the majority of our silica from insoluble dietary fibers. We can also get silica from spring water, but so many people drink some form of purified water, which removes the minerals. Even a lot of the "spring water" sold in stores has gone through a purification process. Therefore, fibers are the primary silica source for most people.

                          I prefer rice bran or oat bran, which are both silica rich and good sources of B vitamins. They are also soft fibers so they are not as irritating to the intestinal wall as hard fibers. Herbally my favorite source is bamboo, stalk that is 7 times higher in silica than horsetail grass (shavegrass) and is a lot safer. Other good choices are seaweeds, nettle leaf and couch grass.

                          Another great option is adding food grade diatomaceous earth to your water:

                          How to use diatomaceous earth in water

                          For vitamin C I prefer natural sources since they tend to much stronger and more stable than the commonly sold synthetic ascorbic acid. Food sources include papaya, kiwis and berries. With herbal sources I prefer acerola cherry, rosehips and amla.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by patski View Post
                            AHA! That's what my naturopathic doc said too.

                            What do I do to treat this? Smaller meals haven't helped.

                            I'm going out to buy licorice root powder and yucca root powder today. Maybe they'll help with gastritis?
                            Gastritis is inflammation of the stomach, and can have different causes such as infection of the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

                            Licorice root and yucca root will both reduce the inflammation and licorice root also helps with the healing process.

                            Keep in mind though that if there is any gastrointestinal bleeding then the yucca is not a good idea since the high saponin content can hemolyze the blood cells leading to pain.

                            If you can find out why there is gastritis and address the cause as well that would be a big help as well. For example, if H. pylori is an issue then the bacteria needs to be killed or if from NSAID use getting off the NSAIDs.

                            Originally posted by patski View Post
                            James, you've been super helpful. Thanks!!!
                            You're welcome.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              James, my indigestion started months ago when I figured out through trial and error that I have candidiasis.

                              However, I'm not sure that's the case anymore. I've eliminated many food allergens over the last two weeks, but my gastritis is still sticking around. I have a feeling it's from many years of Advil abuse thanks to my monthly visitor.

                              Just took your recommended dose of licorice/yucca root powder with some water. I'll keep taking it before meals and report back. Thanks
                              A Post-Primal PrimalPat

                              Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                [QUOTE=Iron Will;931042]
                                Originally posted by JamesS View Post

                                JamesS thank you again for all the information that you've shared I'm sure that my head will be swimming in a few days with all the reading. I'm excited to start!

                                I was wondering what your thoughts are on using Arginine as another supplement for cramping? I use Arginine as a way to increase training volume, recovery and GH. This is the first time I've actually made the connection with cramping. Thoughts?
                                I never recommend arginine because there are too many people with latent herpes viruses and arginine triggers these viruses. This is why some people use lysine to treat herpes outbreaks. Lysine antagonizes arginine.

                                Arginine can stimulate the release of growth hormone, but it requires a pretty large amount (8g+) to do so.

                                As far as cramps go I would not recommend arginine. Arginine is a component of arginine vasopressin that is increased during the menstrual cycle and is believed to play a role in the synthesis of prostaglandins that lead to the menstrual cramping.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X