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  • Most healing foods?

    For about 8 years (from age 22 to 30), I lived a pretty excessive lifestyle. I partied heavily, I was a stressed workaholic, I lived on bread, cereals, sugar, was vegetarian on and off for about 8 years, and vegan for a year.! And did I mention my exercise regime? Oh right... there wasn't one! (Unless you include walking (to the car) and dancing for days and nights at the weekends).

    Anyway, a year ago I was diagnosed with adrenal exhaustion. I didn't take it very seriously (partially because it was an osteopath / naturopath who did the diagnosis, and partially because I didn't know what it meant), and I promptly forgot about it. Even though I had been going to doctors for months before that trying to figure out why I was felt burnt out / depressed / couldn't sleep etc.

    I've been Primal and pretty healthy for about 6 months now (and in addition I don't drink), but the other day that I remembered what the osteopath had said.

    Whether it was an accurate diagnosis or not, it's pretty likely that I did some damage to myself throughout my twenties. I have a lot more energy since going Primal, but these days I still don't sleep properly, and it doesn't take much effort for me to feel burnt out.

    I want to start a regime of eating really nourishing, healing foods, to balance my hormones and reduce the inflammation I can feel in my body. Can anyone recommend the most healing foods they know of?

    I've started with daily bone broth

    Thanks.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  • #2
    Bone broth is great - I'm just making some! To get more healthy minerals, you could use real, unrefined sea salt, for example that grey, moist and coarse salt from the Guérande which is rich in magnesium (you're in London, you should be able to get that). Egg yolks are a nutritional powerhouse. Read this article by Chris Masterjohn (I don't know how to put in links that work, but you just have to google "The Incredible, Edible Egg Yolk".)

    If you salt your broth with real sea salt and beat one or two eggyolks and put them in, you get a good healing soup! (Attention, the broth must have stopped boiling; otherwise you get a sort of scrambled egg soup.)

    Fish oil / omega 3 comes to mind if you want to heal inflammation.

    Offal, especially liver, if you can stomach it. (Try a good brand of paté if you feel you can't eat fried liver as it is.) Liver is said to be nature's multivitamin pill.

    The Site of the Weston A. Price Foundation has a lot of information about healing foods. They are not primal because they advocate grains, but they have good advice about good fats etc.

    Comment


    • #3
      there are plenty of posts from mark and on here about foods that are super-duper powerhouses, like offal, oysters, leafy greens, grass-fed ruminant meats and pastured eggs.

      Top 10 Foods I Couldn't Live Without | Mark's Daily Apple

      yeah, bone broth is like magic potion. my most frequent first meal of the day is some bone broth with greens and 2-3 eggs.

      good for you on taking charge of your health.
      As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

      – Ernest Hemingway

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      • #4
        Thanks to both of you for the info. Can't stomach offal yetpaté is a great way to get into it! But what do you put it on?
        "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

        In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

        - Ray Peat

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by YogaBare View Post
          Thanks to both of you for the info. Can't stomach offal yetpaté is a great way to get into it! But what do you put it on?
          Try a veggie with not much taste. Baby bok choy have those cute little cuppy things at the end. Celery, which I can't stand, but some folks like. Fennel/anise, which does have flavor, but it does go pretty well with pate.

          Or my favorite: just eat it off a fork.
          "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

          B*tch-lite

          Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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          • #6
            I love paté / liverwurst on cucumber slices! It's a great combination.

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            • #7
              Plain pork rinds make great "chips/crackers" for your pate. I hate liver and this is the only way I can stomach it.

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