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making bone broth in a crock pot?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Pooka View Post
    Maybe someone can clear up some confusion for me. When making the bone broth, do you keep the water level above the bones through the whole cooking process? Or does it cook down, and if it cooks down, how far? I've only tried once, but I think I diluted it too much because I kept adding water to keep the bones covered, and it didn't turn out too well.
    The heat shouldn't be so high that you're getting that much evaporation. Keep a lid on the pot (on the stove or crockpot) and if the temperature is right, you shouldn't need to add water even after 12 or more hours. You want barely simmering, not boiling.

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    • #17
      A crock pot would be fine for small batches but you'd have to keep an eye on the liquid level. Mine cooks kind of hot, even on low.

      I use my old laying hens for stock, since they aren't really edible any other way. I plop a whole bird in my giant kettle, cover with a couple gallons of cold water, add salt and the contents of the stock baggie I keep in the freezer and turn it up to a near boil. Then it gets turned to a simmer, hot enough to keep cooties at bay, but low enough I can leave it for 24 hours.

      One reason people are 'trained' to avoid salt is that it can toughen meat during the simemring process. But if you're not going to use the meat for a normal meal, it actually helps extract the flavor. I think of it as making meat tea. Also, toss celery butts & tops, carrot trimmings, onion peels into your stock bag. When it's full, make stock. The onion peels add nice color, as do carrot bits.

      When i make beef stock, I use some flanken-style short ribs plus beef shank that my butcher sliced about 3/4" thick. It's a fair amount of meat, plus a butt-load of marrow. I roast them all up before tossing in the kettle, then simmer the same as the chicken stock.

      The two steers I raised provided so much 'soup bone' that I still have enough for a few more canner loads. I will sure miss it when it's gone.

      When the stock is strained out for canning, I separate out anything the dogs can't have, and freeze what they can have in big zippies. When I have enough, plus random meat bits/offal, I can a batch of 'dog food', basically a stew to pour over their kibble. Great way to clean out the freezer and they love it.

      We'll be slaughtering some old biddies this weekend, so time to make more stock. I'm going to can some up as soup too, with potatoes, carrots, soup celery & onions. Meal in a jar!
      Last edited by JBailey; 08-08-2012, 05:55 PM.
      Seven Trees Farm - diversified subsistence farming on 1.25 acres.

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      • #18
        You shouldn't be losing that much liquid. Keep your pot (either crock or stove) covered and lower the heat.

        Originally posted by Pooka View Post
        Maybe someone can clear up some confusion for me. When making the bone broth, do you keep the water level above the bones through the whole cooking process? Or does it cook down, and if it cooks down, how far? I've only tried once, but I think I diluted it too much because I kept adding water to keep the bones covered, and it didn't turn out too well.

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        • #19
          Thanks for the advice all. My crock pot may be too hot. I was simmering on low, but it still lost a lot of moisture. I'll try it on the stove in a stock pot next time.

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