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  • How many cans of tuna . . .?

    How many average sized cans of tuna, not little mini ones or big family sized ones, would it take to satisfy my need for Omega 3? Not a big fish eater but I'm working on it, I can manage tuna salad, whole can each, using bell pepper "scoops" suggested by another poster, about twice a week.

  • #2
    You'd be better off with an occasional can of sardines. They real don't taste much different than tuna.

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    • #3
      most tuna from a can has basically no fat. teh high-end brands may in fact contain the omega3 they tout on the label, but that's certainly the exception and not the rule.

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      • #4
        Agreed. Or get canned mackerel. Or frozen, it's usually cheaper.
        Crohn's, doing SCD

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        • #5
          I would go with sardines as well, about a can a day & I like it more than tuna, less dry. Though I like my tuna with horseradish or avocado.... Or smoked salmon. Or soup from salmon heads and trimmings, and eat the fatty parts of the head, oh, my! Mmgh.
          My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
          When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Rosemary 231 View Post
            How many average sized cans of tuna, not little mini ones or big family sized ones, would it take to satisfy my need for Omega 3? Not a big fish eater but I'm working on it, I can manage tuna salad, whole can each, using bell pepper "scoops" suggested by another poster, about twice a week.
            I eat three or four cans of tuna, salmon or sardines a week if not supplementing. Personally I like Wild Planet, seem well sourced and even if the canning seems suspect the explanation is reasonable.

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            • #7
              NRDC: Mercury Contamination in Fish - Eating Tuna Safely

              careful with tuna -- mercury, ya know?
              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

              Ernest Hemingway

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              • #8
                Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                NRDC: Mercury Contamination in Fish - Eating Tuna Safely

                careful with tuna -- mercury, ya know?
                There is contention on mercury in fish. Some mercury is from presumably pollution, but some comes from the actual natural processes of the Earth--I think the Mid Atlantic Ridge is one place. At least for the the latter and possibly the former, the fish has something else in it that blocks the absorption of the mercury when you eat it. Sorry for the vagueness. That should be a good start if you wanted to do more research.

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                • #9
                  ^ Selenium. Not sure how preventive it really is

                  Also there is huge variation in the amount of O3 in canned tuna. I go for albacore, which is the best I've found for O3. I have four or five cans of fish per week, mixing it up between albacore, red salmon, sardines, sardine sprats and mackerel. All taste good
                  Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                  Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                  • #10
                    What about those of us who can't stand the taste of seafood? I'm weird, I know, but I HATE seafood. Can't even stand to be around the smell of it and yes, I've tried various different items cooked various ways.

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                    • #11
                      Do you like olive oil? Get the fish packed in it and that's a big influence on what you taste.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RobinNM View Post
                        What about those of us who can't stand the taste of seafood? I'm weird, I know, but I HATE seafood. Can't even stand to be around the smell of it and yes, I've tried various different items cooked various ways.
                        My husband couldn't stand the taste of liver and dosed it with ketchup. I rather not eat tuna but it's the easiest to get down. I make tuna salad. The mayo, sweet relish, onion, celery and bell peppers plus salt and pepper helps a lot.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Rosemary 231 View Post
                          My husband couldn't stand the taste of liver and dosed it with ketchup. I rather not eat tuna but it's the easiest to get down. I make tuna salad. The mayo, sweet relish, onion, celery and bell peppers plus salt and pepper helps a lot.

                          I don't understand the point of eating food one does not like. If one has to force something down, or douse it in something else to make it palatable, it seems pointless. Food, aside from nourishing your body, should also be about enjoyment. I thought that was one of the points of "primal." No more crappy, dry, tasteless food, but real, whole, delicious food the way nature intended it. If I don't like it, I don't eat it. There is plenty of other good food out there for me to enjoy.
                          Female, age 51, 5' 9"
                          SW - 183 (Jan 22, 2012), CW - 159, GW - healthy.

                          Met my 2012 goals by losing 24 pounds.
                          2013 goals are to get fit and strong!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jojohaligo View Post
                            I don't understand the point of eating food one does not like. If one has to force something down, or douse it in something else to make it palatable, it seems pointless. Food, aside from nourishing your body, should also be about enjoyment. I thought that was one of the points of "primal." No more crappy, dry, tasteless food, but real, whole, delicious food the way nature intended it. If I don't like it, I don't eat it. There is plenty of other good food out there for me to enjoy.
                            As a boy, my husband's mom was very firm about eating what was in front of you. He had to eat it but ketchup was tolerated. The one time she insisted he eat oyster stew the outcome, at the table yet, was messy. Never had to eat it again. As for me, I want to increase my omega 3s. Once or twice weekly, a meal of tuna salad is inexpensive as well as healthy. I love shrimp but it's also pricey.

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                            • #15
                              pastured eggs are a good source of omega-3. i can't tolerate the smell of canned tuna, but i do love it sashimi style or as a grilled steak.
                              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                              Ernest Hemingway

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