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  • #31
    Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
    i could see making a sort of asian-inspired soup with them -- coconut milk, lime zest, lemongrass, chili sauce, etc.
    That is an outstanding idea!
    Last edited by Pamsc; 07-29-2012, 10:58 AM. Reason: html error
    __________________________
    age 56, type 2 diabetes, swimmer
    low carb since 2006 thanks to Jenny, primal since Jan. 2012

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    • #32
      Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
      trader joe's sells plenty of frozen, non-breaded, fish filets, if there is one near you. living in new england, i have access to excellent fresh fish, so never buy anything frozen besides shrimp.
      We do have a Trader Joes close by. I can check there. Thanks.

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      • #33
        I was just at a naturopath this morning and asked what she recommended as far as tuna consumption. She said to stay away from the albacore and go for the flaked tuna, as the flaked usually comes from smaller fish. She said to try not to have more than 1 can per week. I think that's pretty conservative, but I just thought I'd share.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by vb66 View Post
          I was just at a naturopath this morning and asked what she recommended as far as tuna consumption. She said to stay away from the albacore and go for the flaked tuna, as the flaked usually comes from smaller fish. She said to try not to have more than 1 can per week. I think that's pretty conservative, but I just thought I'd share.
          Thanks for asking her. I had planned on 1 to 2 per week.

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          • #35
            trader joe's also has wild salmon, in cans, reasonably priced. the pink is less strong-tasting than the red.
            As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

            Ernest Hemingway

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            • #36
              Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
              trader joe's also has wild salmon, in cans, reasonably priced. the pink is less strong-tasting than the red.
              Thanks, good to know.

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              • #37
                What type of fish is it? - Safcol Australia
                this is the tuna I buy.

                How does mercury come into it?

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                • #38
                  OK in case anyone is interested, I contacted the company for the tuna I buy about mercury and BPA, and this is their response:
                  Thank you for your email. Our Technical Services Manager has advised the following:

                  Our can manufacturer has confirmed that there is no BPA used in the manufacture of our products. Our products are safe to consume. High levels of mercury are accumulated in larger fish in particular fresh fish such as Swordfish, Flake and Shark. The Australian Food Standards Code requires the mercury limit in our product to be less than 0.5mg/kg. Testing has shown our levels to be well under this. Mercury levels in our canned products are well below the legal limit.

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                  • #39
                    Canned tuna is not the best source of healthy fat so go for sardines instead! Canned sardines are excellent and can be used in soups and you will hardly guess that there is any sardines in it at all. Personally I am not very fond of the sardine taste, but I eat a 425 grams can of sardines in tomato sauce per week anyway for the great health benefits! I mash the tomato sause and sardines to a pasta and use it in soups, and you can freeze down the rest in portions after opening a can....
                    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                    - Schopenhauer

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                    • #40
                      I feed sardines to my cats occasionally, not sure i could make myself eat them. May try someday though.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Ayla2010 View Post
                        I feed sardines to my cats occasionally, not sure i could make myself eat them. May try someday though.
                        Your cat should at least be very healthy then, right now I am eating a spicy chicken soup made on broth, sardines, spinach, garlic, chili, oregano, lime and of course chicken. Delicious...
                        "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                        - Schopenhauer

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                        • #42
                          our pets should be very healthy, they also eat raw meat. Dogs eat raw meaty bones, with some of our leftovers occasionally. No chemicals/vaccines etc either.

                          I might try a soup like that, sounds not too bad.

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                          • #43
                            I gave up canned tuna when I went primal - actually as I was transitioning into it. I used to eat it as a cheap source of protein - I didn't know from 03/06. By the time I went from the soy contained national brands to the bpa-free lower mercury brands, I watched that cheap source go from about $1.10 a can to about $2.35 a can (5 oz cans). Considering that most (all?) canned tuna is cooked before processing, and even the stuff packed in oil is suspect since most imported olive oil in this country is suspect, I just added it to my processed food list and forgot about it.

                            For me it almost always comes down to this: if most Americans eat it on a regular basis, big food has turned it into garbage.

                            It's easy enough to google the fish with the highest 03 levels, but pretty much wild salmon, sardines, and mackeral are always on the list. Albacore tuna is nice and fatty, but again, in a can, in my mind has pretty much been cooked to death.

                            Shell fish and a lot of white fish are great for protein and some B vitamins, but aren't very fatty. They do taste grand.

                            Even fresh tuna from an upscale market is suspect if you don't live close to the coast. I once asked a Market of Choice how often their "fresh sushi grade tuna" was delivered and the answer was twice a week. Ummm. Okay, that's better than canned, but on day three, it ain't fresh. A lower end grocery store had frozen tuna steaks (usually cleaned and frozen while still at sea), and those puppies smelled yummy when defrosted - just like the ocean.

                            The bottom line is that in the US, if you want healthy, wholesome food that hasn't been processed to death, you're going to have to work at it or pay through the nose. I hate it, but there it is.
                            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                            B*tch-lite

                            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                            • #44
                              If you have a local Asian Market, look at their fresh-frozen fish selection. Ours has mussles, oysters, clams, and some I don't recognize.
                              "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                              • #45
                                I have been meaning to check out those kinds of shops, ill look next time I am near one.
                                I think we are quite lucky here in Aus, so I should be grateful.
                                Tuna, toilet paper, butter, cream, and olive oil are the only things I buy at the supermarket. I shop and small farms for meat, eggs, fruit and veg

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