Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can You Eat Too Much Fruit?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    When it comes to fat loss, calories are important, but it's a complicated process. And, every body responds differently to the type of food it's given.

    For example, I've only ever been able to lose fat by eating high protein/low fat (with plenty of fruit). As soon as I eat a lot of fat, I gain fat. Others have different results. So there's no way for us to tell you how much is too much. I'd follow the previous suggestion of tracking what you're eating and comparing that with your progress (or lack of). Then you can experiment once you see how your body is behaving with what you're giving it.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by dragonmamma View Post
      You said you're still losing weight, so why worry about it? This is the time of year when fruit is plentiful and cheap, so go for it. Another month or two and all those lovely berries and melons will start tasting like watery mush. Then you can start another thread about eating too much pumpkin.
      Agree here. If you are losing weight, then don't worry about it. We have a lot of fruit at my place and I eat it like it's going out of style. But so long as I'm continuing to drop pounds, I'm not bothering with counting or limiting, so long as the foods I'm eating are real (primal) foods. Now, when I hit the inevitable plateau, that will be a different story. I'll actually start doing some counting and considering cutting back on the carbs, including fruit. But until then... tis the season for delicious fruit... so enjoy.
      My Primal Journal - Food, pics, the occasional rant, so...the usual.

      I love cooking. It's sexy science that you stuff in your face. - carlh

      Comment


      • #18
        So many people on here believe in calories and I just don't understand that. Calories were invented in the early 19th century by a Frenchman as a way of measuring how much energy is used to raise the temperature of a set amount of water by one degree.

        It's all very well saying calories in must equal calories out but over ten years you would only have to eat one extra bite a day to put on extra weight and no-one is that good at calorie counting.

        Secondly if you say a room got full because more people entered than left, it doesn't tell you WHY they did that. Any medical textbook will tell you that ingested fat doesn't turn to fat and that carbohydrates cause a rise in blood glucose AND an insulinogenic response. Doctors used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes by reducing carbs, now they just tell us to stuff meds. But when we low carb, we take the stress off our pancreas as we don't need to produce so much insulin. Insulin is part of the survival mechanism, the more of it in your bloodstream the less fat you lose. Carbs metabolise into glucose,insulin drives it into the cells and the excess is laid down as fat. If you have diabetes 2, it's most likely because your cells got resistant to the insulin. Then the excess glucose is floating around in your blood causing damage.

        It's not the fat putting on fat it's the fruit and also protein can be metabolised into glucose too if needed.

        Suggest The Skinny on Obesity on YouTube from Dr Robert Lustig MD, paediatric endocrinologist at UCSF and others.

        Comment


        • #19
          Seems to me that unless you're an elite athlete burning tons of cals and sugar, the answer is an emphatic yes.

          fructose (as in HFCS) may be better (or worse) than glucose, bur is still sugar that jacks up insulin levels (though not as much as glucose). Unlike glucose, sucrose must be processed by your liver - unusually large amounts can likely over tax your liver as well as making you fat.

          For me, cutting the single banana I was eating each day blew me through a serious plateau - though the banana had a payload that included some good stuff, the bad stuff was as bad (for me) as a candy bar. There are veggies with all the good stuff in fruit (vitamins, fiber, antioxidants...) and nowhere near the amount of bad stuff.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by nicolasloran
            When is the best time to eat fruits?Breakfest?tea time?.....
            D. None of the above


            JK...a bit wont kill ya....today.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by nicolasloran
              When is the best time to eat fruits?Breakfest?tea time?.....
              Anytime, EXCEPT as a late night snack. That will spike insulin production. I used to believe that old admonishment of eating fruit alone. But imo I think fruit eaten w/ whole coconut creme or any full fat dairy product(cream, kefir, yogurt) or other full fat foods (even a few soaked nuts, an avocado), slows down it's digestion & slows down the blood sugar spike normally associated w/ eating fruit alone.

              For sure, today's hybridized fruits are tons sweeter & much bigger than ancient fruits. They were smaller, less juicy, more bitter & sour & less sweet.
              "Science is not belief but the will to find out." ~ Anonymous
              "Culture of the mind must be subservient to the heart." ~ Gandhi
              "The flogging will continue until morale improves." ~ Unknown

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                Fructose is a known toxin and carcinogen. Glucose ain't. Hence, you can optimise your heath by avoiding fruit and sugar consumption most days.
                Serious?

                I think you can eat too much if you want to loose weight that is what happens with me. Also, don't try living on it or even close to that. I think it is very rare that a person can do this if at all possible. I nearly ruined myself trying.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by nicolasloran
                  When is the best time to eat fruits?Breakfest?tea time?.....
                  when you're at a weight and body composition you're happy with.... or you've resigned to type 2 diabetes and/or insultun resistance.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Artichoke View Post
                    It's all very well saying calories in must equal calories out but over ten years you would only have to eat one extra bite a day to put on extra weight and no-one is that good at calorie counting.
                    We can measure calories in, but we can't really measure calories out, because metabolism is dynamic and can change minut-by-minute. This leads people to (incorrectly) assume that since calories out can't be measured or tracked, then it must not exist.

                    If you want to see an example of your metabolism change, try eating a few spoons of sugar or some fruit. Very shortly afterward, your pulse will likely speed up in reaction to the sugar. This is an indication of increased metabolism. Our bodies are CONSTANTLY adjusting to the amounts and types of food we give it. Eat very low carb or calorie restrict for a few days or more, and your body will slow down metabolism. This may mean that your temperature slightly decreases, your pulse slows down a bit, or any number of unseen internal processes are put on hold.

                    This is why those suggestions to 'cut 100 calories a day and lose 10lbs per year' don't work; aside from the fact that calorie intake AND activity levels change every day, the body is very good at lowering it's daily calorie requirement when it senses chronic undereating. This is the reasoning behind calorie cycling; a few days of lower calorie eating to burn off some fat, then a day of normal or higher calories to prevent metabolism from lowering in response.

                    Originally posted by Artichoke View Post

                    Any medical textbook will tell you that ingested fat doesn't turn to fat and that carbohydrates cause a rise in blood glucose AND an insulinogenic response.
                    Actually, any medical textbook or published article in a medical journal that I've read does indeed say that EXCESS dietary fat is stored directly as adipose tissue.

                    Uptake of individual fatty acids into adipose tissue in relation to their presence in the diet


                    The role of dietary fat in adipose tissue... [Public Health Nutr. 2007] - PubMed - NCBI
                    My n=1 experience supports the eating excess fat = gaining fat scenarios. When I ate ZERO carb, high fat/protein during a 2 week elimination diet (to diagnose a possible fructose malabsorption issue), I gained some fat. I continuted to eat high fat/low carb, kept putting on fat. When i significantly reduced my fat intake and increased carbs, I've started losing some of that fat.
                    Last edited by BestBetter; 07-22-2012, 12:59 PM.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X