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Best way to wash berries?

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  • Best way to wash berries?

    I have a major sensitivity to the low spray/no spray stuff that some farmers use on their fruits. I bought a carton of fresh blueberries at the farmers' market this weekend, and I soaked the berries in water before I ate them. And boom, reaction: felt like my throat was closing, and even now, an hour later, I have a nasty taste in my mouth. It feels like my tongue and the roof of my mouth have been coated in something, and there's an unpleasant tingling too. Feh.

    What is the best way to wash fruit, especially berries? I've been using a pre-fabbed "fruit spray" sort of thing on apples, bell peppers and whatnot, but I'd like to concoct my own fruit/veggie cleanser if possible. Many thanks in advance...
    F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

    **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

    **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

  • #2
    I've been using a spray bottle of 1:1 vinegar:water. America's test kitchen does it a little differently, but says it should extend the shelf life of the berries:
    How To Cook - Cooks Illustrated

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    • #3
      I'd suggest buying organic, rather than hoping you can remove whatever gunk has been sprayed on them.

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      • #4
        Thanks, @yodiewan!

        @Artichoke - I bought these at my local farmer's market. Nothing there is organic, because (apparently) of the expensive certification process. This one vendor said it was low/no spray, so I thought that as long as I washed the berries carefully, it would be OK. I don't have any local organic blueberries around here (that I could find), so that's not an option -- not unless I want to buy organic berries shipped from another state or even another country, and I'm not convinced that would be much healthier. But thanks for the suggestion - I appreciate it.
        F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

        **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

        **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

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        • #5
          There's a British website selling Chinese food called Wai Yee Hong and in the vinegar section today I noticed that it recommends using a clear 5% acidity distilled vinegar for washing pesticide off veg by using 2-3 tablespoons per litre of water.

          It also suggested perking up tired veg by soaking them in a litre of cold water with a tablespoon of distilled vinegar..making rice fluffier by adding a third of a tablespoon of distilled vinegar to the boiling water and using neat distilled vinegar to clean wooden chopping boards.

          We're always told that if it isn't certified organic there's absolutely no guarantee it's organic. No idea whether UK/EU organic certification process is cheaper than US. I've bought Dutch-grown Heirloom tomatoes in Lidl with a USDA organic logo on them recently.
          Last edited by Artichoke; 07-11-2012, 12:31 PM.

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