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  • Real Food Summit

    I've not seen this posted, elsewhere. So, here it is; the Underground Wellness 'The Real Food Summit.' Free access to content fir the duration of the summit.
    All the best!

    PDJ

    The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

    Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

  • #2
    Perhaps, this can be made into a 'sticky' for the duration of the Summit or keep the thread current. The Summit has reached day 3 and had been both interesting and beneficial. The each day's presentations are posted at 00:00 Pacific, and are available free for 24 hours thereafter and the removed to make way for the next content. Due to a technical glitch the first 3 days content is still available. For how long? I don't know, but I would hazard to guess, no more than a few hours.
    All the best!

    PDJ

    The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

    Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

    Comment


    • #3
      Link isn't working for me. Is this the same thing? Real Food Summit

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, Metric, thanks; that's the one. It seems that 'embedding' the links in the text causes the links to get 'lost.'

        I checked the main UG site and the previous content will stay up 'til noon, Pacific time. Also, each day on the UG blogtalk radio show Sean interviews previous speakers. Tonight he's got Chris Kresser importance of (fish and seafood), Jeffrey Smith (GMOs) and Sarah Pope (bone broth). Link to tonight's radio show, on the right of > Underground Wellness - Holistic Health and Nutrition Information - Protandim Review
        All the best!

        PDJ

        The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

        Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

        Comment


        • #5
          I've been enjoying it as well! I'm glad it's broken up over several days. Otherwise, I might not have seen the light of day for a bit from listening to them all at once.
          Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

          Comment


          • #6
            I've been recording them (losing the slide show part) for listening as podcasts. Some are better than others, but the variety seems good.
            5' 9" 47 YO F
            PB start June 2, 2012
            Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)
            Current deadlift 245 lbs, squat 165 lbs, bench press 135 lbs


            PB Journal

            Comment


            • #7
              Today's summit presenters are; Dr. Cate Shanahan - Medical Doctor and Author of Deep Nutrition (Healthy or Hype? 5 Simple Tests,) John Wood - Farmer/US Wellness Meats (When animals eat right, you can, too,) Gray Graham - Author, Pottinger's Prophecy (Pottinger's Prophecy: the Powerful Impact of Food on Epigenetics.) And tonight's guest on the UG Wellness radio phone-in Q&A are Mark McAfee (Raw Milk) and Yuri Elkaim (Superfoods.)
              All the best!

              PDJ

              The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

              Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm listening to Zoe Harcombes prsentation on obesity. She said meats are mostly unsaturated fat. And dairy is the only food source that is predominately saturated. So for those of us eho don't do dairy, are we not getiing saturated fats? What about tallow and animal fats and such?
                Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Good Calories/Bad Calories (Taubes) p. 168-9 (FWIW)

                  "Consider a porterhouse steak with a quarter-inch layer of fat. After broiling, this steak will reduce to almost equal parts fat and protein*. Fifty-one percent of the fat is monounsaturated, of which 90 percent is oleic acid. Saturated fat constitutes 45 percent of the total fat, but a third of that is stearic acid, which will increase HDL cholesterol while having no effect on LDL. (Stearic acid is metabolized in the body to oleic acid, according to Grundy's research.) The remaining 4 percent of the fat is polyunaturated, which lowers LDL cholesterol but has no meaningful effect on HDL. In sum, perhaps as much as 70 percent of the fat content of a porterhouse steak will improve the relative levels of LDL and HDL cholesterol, compared with what they would be if carbohydrates such as bread, potatoes, or pasta were consumed. The remaining 30 percent will raise LDL cholesterol, but will also raise HDL cholesterol and will have an insignificant effect, if any, on the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL. All of this suggests that eating a porterhouse steak in lieu of bread or potatoes would actually reduce heart-disease risk, although virtually no nutritional authority will say so publicly. The same is true for lard and bacon.


                  * The nutritional constituents of such a piece of relatively fatty meat can be found in the Nutrient Database for Standard Reference at the USDA website, along with those of thousands of other foods."

                  What I get from that is that you're getting plenty of sat fat in beef tallow, pork lard etc. And I have yet to watch Zoe's presentation, but I wonder how much she got from reading the same book.
                  5' 9" 47 YO F
                  PB start June 2, 2012
                  Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)
                  Current deadlift 245 lbs, squat 165 lbs, bench press 135 lbs


                  PB Journal

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by June68 View Post
                    Good Calories/Bad Calories (Taubes) p. 168-9 (FWIW)

                    "Consider a porterhouse steak with a quarter-inch layer of fat. After broiling, this steak will reduce to almost equal parts fat and protein*. Fifty-one percent of the fat is monounsaturated, of which 90 percent is oleic acid. Saturated fat constitutes 45 percent of the total fat, but a third of that is stearic acid, which will increase HDL cholesterol while having no effect on LDL. (Stearic acid is metabolized in the body to oleic acid, according to Grundy's research.) The remaining 4 percent of the fat is polyunaturated, which lowers LDL cholesterol but has no meaningful effect on HDL. In sum, perhaps as much as 70 percent of the fat content of a porterhouse steak will improve the relative levels of LDL and HDL cholesterol, compared with what they would be if carbohydrates such as bread, potatoes, or pasta were consumed. The remaining 30 percent will raise LDL cholesterol, but will also raise HDL cholesterol and will have an insignificant effect, if any, on the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL. All of this suggests that eating a porterhouse steak in lieu of bread or potatoes would actually reduce heart-disease risk, although virtually no nutritional authority will say so publicly. The same is true for lard and bacon.


                    * The nutritional constituents of such a piece of relatively fatty meat can be found in the Nutrient Database for Standard Reference at the USDA website, along with those of thousands of other foods."

                    What I get from that is that you're getting plenty of sat fat in beef tallow, pork lard etc. And I have yet to watch Zoe's presentation, but I wonder how much she got from reading the same book.

                    So it sounds like whole foods have the right balances of all the fats, and not one single fat has to dominate our diets nor do we have to calculate it?
                    Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well I think it depends on what you're trying to achieve with your food intake and I can't say that I have done any calculating about this. Right now I'm just concentrating on eating whole foods and taking off the poundage. It seems like just staying away from polyunsaturated fats, refined carbohydrates and sugar is a sensible option that improves a lot of systems and measures (like serum cholesterol).
                      5' 9" 47 YO F
                      PB start June 2, 2012
                      Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)
                      Current deadlift 245 lbs, squat 165 lbs, bench press 135 lbs


                      PB Journal

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GeorgiaPeach View Post
                        I'm listening to Zoe Harcombes prsentation on obesity. She said meats are mostly unsaturated fat. And dairy is the only food source that is predominately saturated. So for those of us eho don't do dairy, are we not getiing saturated fats? What about tallow and animal fats and such?
                        I guess it all depends on how one defines "mostly". If the definition is anything over 50%, then 50.00001% would qualify, but most of us would consider that to be a distinction without a difference.

                        Originally posted by National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 24
                        Nutrient data for 13001, Beef, carcass, separable lean and fat, choice, raw

                        Lipids Unit Value per 100.0g
                        Fatty acids, total saturated g 9.750
                        Fatty acids, total monounsaturated g 10.470
                        Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated g 0.920
                        So, it looks to me like approximately speaking, beef is about near as makes no difference 49% saturated fat, so Zoe is technically, albeit somewhat pedantically, correct in this case.


                        Originally posted by National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 24
                        Nutrient data for 10224, Pork, fresh, loin, top loin (roasts), boneless, separable lean and fat, raw


                        Lipids Unit Value per 100.0g
                        Fatty acids, total saturated g 1.598
                        Fatty acids, total monounsaturated g 1.861
                        Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated g 0.651
                        So, pork is about 40% saturated fat.

                        Lamb, about 47% saturated.

                        Chicken, 31%.

                        For dairy, let's start off with half and half:

                        Originally posted by National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 24
                        Nutrient data for 01049, Cream, fluid, half and half

                        Lipids Unit Value per 100.0g
                        Fatty acids, total saturated g 7.158
                        Fatty acids, total monounsaturated g 3.321
                        Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated g 0.427
                        So, it looks like half and half skews to about 66% saturated fat. But notice that gram per gram, you get more saturated fat from beef than from half and half. Moreover, I regularly put away 500g of steak, and I have yet to down anywhere near 500g of half and half.

                        Cheddar:

                        Originally posted by National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 24
                        Nutrient data for 01009, Cheese, cheddar

                        Lipids Unit Value per 100.0g
                        Fatty acids, total saturated g 21.092
                        Fatty acids, total monounsaturated g 9.391
                        Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated g 0.942
                        So, in terms of saturated fat, 250g of cheddar is roughly equivalent to 500g of beef. Keep in mind, though, that if you are eating predominantly lean cuts of meat ( see my pork example, above ) your overall fat intake is getting clobbered relative to someone that eats cheeses on a regular basis. This might be something to think about.

                        All in all, though, if I were you, I would not worry about this.

                        -PK
                        My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

                        Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Argh, I'm bummed. Missed out on Day 5 videos. Anybody see them? Any high points?
                          My Primal Journal - Food, pics, the occasional rant, so...the usual.

                          I love cooking. It's sexy science that you stuff in your face. - carlh

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pklopp View Post
                            I guess it all depends on how one defines "mostly". If the definition is anything over 50%, then 50.00001% would qualify, but most of us would consider that to be a distinction without a difference.



                            So, it looks to me like approximately speaking, beef is about near as makes no difference 49% saturated fat, so Zoe is technically, albeit somewhat pedantically, correct in this case.




                            So, pork is about 40% saturated fat.

                            Lamb, about 47% saturated.

                            Chicken, 31%.

                            For dairy, let's start off with half and half:



                            So, it looks like half and half skews to about 66% saturated fat. But notice that gram per gram, you get more saturated fat from beef than from half and half. Moreover, I regularly put away 500g of steak, and I have yet to down anywhere near 500g of half and half.

                            Cheddar:



                            So, in terms of saturated fat, 250g of cheddar is roughly equivalent to 500g of beef. Keep in mind, though, that if you are eating predominantly lean cuts of meat ( see my pork example, above ) your overall fat intake is getting clobbered relative to someone that eats cheeses on a regular basis. This might be something to think about.

                            All in all, though, if I were you, I would not worry about this.

                            -PK

                            This is comforting. I eat a lot of meat but no dairy. And I usually don't eat lean cuts. I was so stressed today, and I made myself the most calming lunch: Cauliflower, carrots, ginger, garlic and bok choy in homemade bone broth topped with homemade tallow and a huge piece of salmon on top. I felt so much more relaxed when I got done! Yay fat!! I really feel better when my diet is dominated by meat. I come from a native american family... I'm far down the line though... And I read about how veggies and berries were garnishments to their meats. I wish tribal communities still existed so we could learn more traditional ways of living.
                            Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Just listened to Barry Groves: Gorillas and ruminants are on high-fat, no/low carb diets. (Made me feel warm all over.) Real Food Summit
                              All the best!

                              PDJ

                              The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

                              Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

                              Comment

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