Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fat adapted = better sleep?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fat adapted = better sleep?

    When I went vegetarian 4 years ago, my already-sketchy-sleeping-styles went from average to abysmal. If I ate a normal-sized meal in the evening, I would wake after four hours of sleep, and toss and turn til I ate something again (usually bread). The only thing that helped was grossly overeating for a couple of days. I knew deep down that it has something to do with my diet, but everyone (doctors, naturopaths etc.) told me it was psychological.

    Queue recently where, after starting Primal and cutting grains, my insomnia flared up again.
    Upping my carb intake didn't help much, so I went back to my old friend overeating (though not so much junk).

    From my research I discovered that many, many people (primarily on low carb diets like atkins) report difficulty sleeping once they cut their carbohydrate source, but I wasn't able to find an answer as to why. And then it struck me -

    Basically, when the average, sugar burning person sleeps, they use up glycerin stores. When these get depleted (which they do easily - particularly if you're eating low carb), the body cannot rest, because it starts looking for fuel. The result is waking fitfully throughout the night, feeling hungry.

    When you're vegetarian, you're automatically on a "healthy" low animal fat diet, hence you're relying primarily on sugars as your source of fuel. Unless you're eating really heavy carbs at night, these get depleted quickly, and make you wake.

    If you're fat adapted, it doesn't matter if your glycerin stores are low, because your body has a constant source of fuel to keep it in a state of rest.

    Now that I've figured it out it seems so obvious! All the little cheats I was doing that stopped me from being a fat burner also stopped me from getting the night's sleep I was desperate for.

    Anybody find they're sleeping better when they're fat adapted?
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  • #2
    I know longer wake up becaue I'm hungry, and I don't have to eat right before bed, so my chances of a good nights sleep have improved. Unfortunatly external factors (small, cute, come wandering in bleary eyed at 2am and take up a dispropotionate amount of bed space) play a large part in the amount of sleep I get
    You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

    Comment


    • #3
      What a timely post! I've had abysmal sleep for over a month now. Tossing, spinning, mind racing, hot flashes - goes on for hours during the middle part of the night. But I can generally finally get to sleep about 5 a.m., but by the time I have to get up at 6:30-7, my body feels totally sluggish. UGH!

      I have been doing a fairly strict Whole30 for the past 2 months. I am just now adding in a few "non-Whole30" foods, namely cheese and wine twice in the past week, and a piece of birthday cake last night as the first sugar or grains in over 2 months. So I can't really say I'm "fat adapted" right at the moment, but I certainly have been in the past 2 months.

      In my younger, pre-menopausal days, I would sleep like a brick for the first 4-5 hours or so of the night, get up to pee, then sleep slightly more lightly for the last 2-3 hours. And wake up refeshed, not ass-draggin' like now...

      Comment


      • #4
        Hm...interesting idea. I wonder how long it takes to become fat adapted in this way? I'm a little over a month of 100% primal and low on the carb scale and I still sleep like crap, waking up for at least an hour in the middle of the night. It sucks. I've experimented with ambient light, turning of LCD screens early and booze/no booze....nothing has worked so far. When I'm desperate I take melatonin, but seriously, the only thing that keeps me asleep is NyQuil and I don't want to resort to that when I don't have a cold. I wish I knew the answer.
        5' 9" 47 YO F
        PB start June 2, 2012
        Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)
        Current deadlift 245 lbs, squat 165 lbs, bench press 135 lbs


        PB Journal

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by June68 View Post
          Hm...interesting idea. I wonder how long it takes to become fat adapted in this way? I'm a little over a month of 100% primal and low on the carb scale and I still sleep like crap, waking up for at least an hour in the middle of the night.
          If it's not because of hunger you wake up, then it might be perfectly normal:
          What is Biphasic Sleep? | Mark's Daily Apple
          Take a walk on the wild side.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't think it's hunger since I don't feel pangs or my stomach growling; I'm just awake. Tres annoying. If it continues I'll have to reevaluate and see about this biphasic sleep deal.
            5' 9" 47 YO F
            PB start June 2, 2012
            Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)
            Current deadlift 245 lbs, squat 165 lbs, bench press 135 lbs


            PB Journal

            Comment


            • #7
              June, I feel your pain! I know what it's like. How do you sleep before and after waking? Are you sleeping soundly or do you toss and turn?

              I'm skeptical of the bi-phasic sleep idea... other non-nocturnal mammals seem to sleep the night through.
              "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

              In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

              - Ray Peat

              Comment


              • #8
                June, btw - was reading your journal a while back - really enjoyed it
                "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                - Ray Peat

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks yogaBare...feel free to chime in on the journal if you like.

                  I sleep pretty soundly when I do, and depending on hormone level, I also remember my dreams. It's that I'm snapped awake in between and it's hell. maybe it will change. Am going to be rigorous about no LCD screen within an hour of turning in/sleep. It seems that's very disruptive.
                  5' 9" 47 YO F
                  PB start June 2, 2012
                  Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)
                  Current deadlift 245 lbs, squat 165 lbs, bench press 135 lbs


                  PB Journal

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When eating a SAD and vegan diet, I could sleep for over 12 hours no issue (restless sleep - lots of tossing and turning) and would wake up tired and lethargic. Now, I am sleeping better throughout the night and can get away with much less sleep and wake up earlier on my own, without the use of an alarm clock (which would have been previously unheard of).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've looked into insomnia a lot (even started a journal on it :P) because at times I've been so sleep deprived that it's literally taken over my life. I have a few theories about its causes on the journal if you want to check them out - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57032.html I stopped writing in it (laziness).

                      It sounds to me like you're waking up feeling stressed? When I was waking in the night it wasn't with a growling sense of hunger - it was with an urgency to eat something. And not always - sometimes I would just wake. My mind would always be racing. I've recently ditched vegetarianism and really upped my saturated fat intake, and I'm still waking for an hour or so each night, but not with that manic, stressed feeling. So this is still a work in progress, but I definitely think I'm getting closer to the answer.

                      When I used to wake before I would try deep breathing, but it didn't work particularly well... because I was so pissed off at being awake!! Changing my attitude to waking up has really helped. Now when I wake I just think that at least I'm still resting, and that rest is nearly as good as sleep. I focus 100% on resting every part of my body, and enjoying the rest, and I actually fall asleep again more quickly, and even enjoy the time I'm awake. Maybe you could try that?

                      And then, while I have come to the conclusion that diet plays a huge role in insomnia, of course it's not the only factor, but I think things like your computer screen being on would have more of an influence on getting to sleep, not stay asleep.
                      Last edited by YogaBare; 07-06-2012, 02:40 PM.
                      "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                      In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                      - Ray Peat

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X